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Question about the TS3650.

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  • #16
    Re: Question about the TS3650.

    I had the exact same problem. After trying several fixes with Ridgid support it turned out to be the front rail. It was slightly 'bowed' downard and outward at the end. They sent a new rail and the fence immediately became accurate from zero to 36". The bow wasn't visable without laying the rail on the saw top and 'rolling' it.
    Poplar Branch Wood Crafts

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    • #17
      Re: Question about the TS3650.

      I must have really lucked out...I've not had any problems with my TS3650 (bought Dec-06) that I've read about in this Forum. The only thing I would call a problem is that the saw table vibrates. It's not a serious enough vibration that I feel must be immediately fixed, but it is a vibration and I may look into it later. (A piece of wood placed at the end of either table wing will skittle around.)

      As far as rip fence measurement consistency, after the first few cuts on my new TS3650, I decided the rip fence was so good that I've been using it as the final measuring device; I rarely check the distance of fence to blade anymore with a tape measure or rule. In fact, I even made a simple jig for the fence to use with the miter gauge, so that the rip fence can still be used to measure the cut (I only have to remember to set the fence at the desired measurement plus an inch, which I have forgot to do a couple times.) But after reading this thread I thought I'd check my fence for consistency across the range of rip widths.

      With two tape measures (12' Stanley and 25' Ace Hdwe), I measured with the fence set at 2, 6, 20, and 36 inches. With the smaller tape measure the fence was dead on consistent at each setting; the larger tape measure indicated a 1/32" variance at the 36" setting. I used the method of measuring that Wood Meister suggested, using a framing square placed at the blade (good idea!). This indicated the fence was skewed, away from the blade at the rear of the fence, by about 3/32". This was more than I originally thought it was, so I adjusted the fence to make it about 1/32" out at the back.

      I might also add that when I start considering measurements that get into the thousandths range (like less than 1/64" = 15.6 thousandths) I am reminded of my college chemistry professor. He insisted that our lab reports begin with the phrase, "Within the limits of the uncertainties of the measurements..." That phrase has stuck with me. I can't help but think that a lot of woodworking folks worry and fret over measurements that are beyond their range of uncertainty. (My wife goes crazy when I "help" her in the kitchen. ) With the two tape measures I have, for example, I can talk about 15.6 thousandths of an inch, but what's the the accuracy of the tape? A reasonable assumption is it's one-half of the smallest graduation of measurement, in which case my small tape is +/- 1/64" and the large tape is +/- 1/32". So to report a measurement of 1/32" (using the small tape measure) is really saying it's somewhere between 1/64" and 3/64". On the large tape, 1/32" really means it's somewhere between 0 and 1/16". Furthermore, having said all that, what difference does less than 1/64" inch really make when talking about wood? 1/128" is 7.8 thousandths; can anyone really tell if a cut is off more than that (across the length of a typical saw table)? I really don't believe I need machinist measurement tools to make adjustments on my table saw to get decent cuts on wood.

      Someone will tell me I'm wrong, I'm sure...

      - djb
      sigpic

      A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

      Restore the Republic.

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      • #18
        Re: Question about the TS3650.

        I expected some kind of response here...perhaps I'm so far removed from reality that no one wants to tell me...

        - djb
        sigpic

        A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

        Restore the Republic.

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        • #19
          Re: Question about the TS3650.

          Well, djb....I think what we're discussing here is more a matter of philosophy than anything else. Personally, I'd prefer to have everything to within 1/64". When doing glue-ups where I'm trying to match grain, I'd prefer much less, honestly. In that kind of work, a very tiny gap is going to be noticeable. I also think that we, as woodworkers, have to accept that wood is a natural medium to work in and will have it's beauty and it's flaws. It will move over time. Keep your measurements as exact as you can, and hope for the best. Whatever you make will be appreciated, even with it's flaws!

          "Oh...that mark...well, wood is a natural substance...that's part of the beauty!" Think to yourself: Don't test it too closely as the putty isn't dry yet!
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #20
            Re: Question about the TS3650.

            Yeah, you're right VASandy, it's a bit of a philosophical question. I understand trying to get cuts as close and accurate as possible. But I can't help but wonder when folks talk about several thousandths of an inch off here or there...maybe I'm just not that sophisticated in this hobby yet.

            For example, I recently made a picture frame, and I made the mitered cuts with the stock TS3650 miter gauge. I also used the rip fence to make the measurements. Attached is a pic of the simple jig I made to use the rip fence with the miter gauge - only have to remember to set the fence an inch longer than the measured cut. But I don't have to measure, if I set the fence at 10", the piece is going to be 9" when it's cut. Even with the 45ยบ cuts for the frame, it still worked great.

            Also attached is a pic of the worse looking frame corner. Granted, this is a simple cut, with pine. It isn't what some would consider to be a perfect cut, but it's pretty darn close, IMO anyway. This is where philosophical considerations come in: at what point are you satisfied with the cut? I was quite pleased that the worst looking miter looked as good as it did. Maybe I've just been incredibly lucky...or maybe the frame looks hideous and I don't realize it... Ignorance is bliss.

            - djb (a.k.a., rude'n'crude woodworker )
            Attached Files
            sigpic

            A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

            Restore the Republic.

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