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  • router speeds

    I have been using routers for a long time, and I guess you can say I don't know anything about the speed changes. When should you use high speed and low speed or in between? I have been using nothing but high speed the whole time, then one day, I think in this forum. I saw someone mention you should use 10,000 on dovetails, is this true? I do own a book on routers, but do you think I can find it. Should soft wood be slower than hard wood? Could be why sometimes when I do raised panels I get a little bit of burn marks, and I thought it was just a dull bit.
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

  • #2
    Re: router speeds

    Check out this link -> http://www.woodzone.com/tips/router_bit_speeds.htm

    It explains things better then I can

    Basically the bigger the bit the slower the speed.
    ie: panel raising bit would use the slowest setting.

    It's also a good idea not to try and hog things all off in one pass.
    A couple of shallower passes will do a much better job, easier on the router and a better finish.


    I don't own a dovetail jig, as the only dovetails I've ever done were by hand so I'm not sure about running the dovetail bit @ 10,000 rpm??
    Kinda makes sense though if you think about it, you're hogging out all that waste in one pass (no way to make multiple passes). I would test this on some scrap using a slower feed rate and a sharp bit.

    Cheers! - Jim
    Cheers! - Jim
    -------------
    All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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    • #3
      Re: router speeds

      Thanks jbergstrom, went and printed that page, strange they don't go by soft and hard wood, just bit sizes. Now I know why I'm getting some burn markings. I usually make 3 passes when I do a raised panel. But running at the wrong speed is doing the harm. Next time I'll slow it down.
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: router speeds

        Originally posted by garager View Post
        strange they don't go by soft and hard wood, just bit sizes. Now I know why I'm getting some burn markings.
        I don't think the hardness of the wood makes all that much difference to the spin rate of the bit, that's more of a feed rate issue. Some woods are definitely harder (Ironwood for example ) and some have nasty things in them like the silica content in Teak (hard on bits and blades) but not all hardwoods are "hard" (ie: Basswood, Balsa, Tulipwood etc.) and not all softwoods are "soft" (ie: Yew or old growth Douglas Fir , lots of bent nails on that one ). Hardwood, Softwood is a bit of a misnomer sometimes.
        Hardwood is deciduous (has leaves), Softwood is coniferous (has needles).

        I used to get burns the odd time with my old Porter Cable router (no evs) and found that if I took less and increased the feed rate it would disappear (not too much though or it would "chatter").
        These days I'm lucky enough to own a Freud FT2200E
        Now I can set the speed to whatever bit i'm using
        I just concentrate on my feed rate now and everythings peachy
        Last edited by jbergstrom; 04-02-2007, 09:34 PM.
        Cheers! - Jim
        -------------
        All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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        • #5
          Re: router speeds

          has anyone tried light dimmer switches for speed control? i have a single speed router and was thinking of an inexpensive way to adjust the speed.

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          • #6
            Re: router speeds

            It depends on the wood sepcies. The last time i did dovetails in 3/4 " pine, i just used the highest speed and did it all in one pass no problem (with a jig).

            Here is a pick of the dovetails
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Re: router speeds

              I tend to drop the speed as the wood gets harder especially if it is resinous like cherry. For example if I had a 1" cove bit I would run it at full speed on pine but drop it to 3/4 speed on cherry maybe a bit less if it burns still. I can usually tell by the sound of the router if the speed and feed are right.

              Cadenz - you can not use a typical light dimmer but they do make variable speed controllers for routers

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              • #8
                Re: router speeds

                Originally posted by franklin pug View Post
                ...The last time i did dovetails in 3/4 " pine, i just used the highest speed and did it all in one pass no problem (with a jig)...
                pug -
                What jig did you use?
                - djb
                sigpic

                A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

                Restore the Republic.

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                • #9
                  Re: router speeds

                  I used the very pricey Leigh D4R Dovetail jig - its available at lee valley tools. Its about 600 dollars CDN but it does a beautiful job.

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                  • #10
                    Re: router speeds

                    Jbergstrom thanks for that link been wondering this same thing for awhile now myself.

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                    • #11
                      Re: router speeds

                      Originally posted by drift393 View Post
                      Jbergstrom thanks for that link been wondering this same thing for awhile now myself.
                      Hey I'm glad you found it useful
                      Cheers! - Jim
                      -------------
                      All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: router speeds

                        Originally posted by franklin pug View Post
                        I used the very pricey Leigh D4R Dovetail jig - its available at lee valley tools. Its about 600 dollars CDN but it does a beautiful job.
                        DOH!
                        I was hoping you'd say you used the $40 Template Master from Stots!
                        Those are nice looking joints, ya got there. (Can I say that?)

                        - djb
                        sigpic

                        A Democracy is 2 wolves and 1 sheep voting on what to have for lunch.

                        Restore the Republic.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: router speeds

                          Thanks for the compliment!

                          Its a good investment if you plan on doing a lot of dove tailing. I don't own one myself, I made that box in a cabinet making class i took from the local college. The instructor had the jig and brought it in for us to try if we wanted to be adventerous.

                          If i was to run into some money I would buy it for sure. There is a learning curve, but once you set it up there is no guess work. The manual that comes with it is fairly large, but is well written. I think it comes with a DVD as well.

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                          • #14
                            Re: router speeds

                            One of the woodworking rags I subscribe to had a good tip to help deal with burns on wood. This applies to all situations where you're using a bearing bit, or running a board along your router table fence. Unfortunately it doesn't work for dovetails or plunge cuts.

                            Put three layers of masking on the riding edge and do your first pass(es) to hog off most of the wood. This is normally when you get burns.

                            Remove the masking tape and do your final pass. You can feed faster since there's so little material left, so it avoids burn issues. But it's enough material removed that the bit will take off most, if not all, of the burned surface.

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                            • #15
                              Re: router speeds

                              Pug, I like your "Crab Is In" sign. I bet they would sell really well at a craft show.

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