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  • New Small Shop

    Hello Guys
    I will building a small shop (10x16) for my woodworking. I am interested in your suggestions for design. I will have 220v for my 2412. I have the major layout but am looking for the small things that will pay big dividends. Most floor tools will be on casters. The others will be benchtops that can be clamp on workbench. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
    Thanks Reggie

    PS. Wanted the 2424 but found a almost new 2412 for $260 at a estate sale.
    Reggie

  • #2
    Reggie, the 2412 will not run on 220. The 2424 will run on either after conversion. If you didn't get an instruction manual when you bought your saw, you can download one from this site.
    Dick

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    • #3
      Thanks Hergy
      Could you please let me know the difference between the 2412 and 2424. I only researched the 2424.
      Reggie

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      • #4
        There's a frequently asked question page on the differences, but I cannot get to it. The FAQ page appears to be busted.

        From memory:
        The motor. TS2424 uses a dual voltage all bearing motor, 2412 single voltage sleeve bearing.

        The mobile base. Which the 2412 doesn't have.

        The fence. Different capacities.

        I can never remember if the new 2412 has the microadjust trunnion like the new 2424 has.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Dave,
          How big of a shop do you have right now? I started out in an 8x10 building but as of about 2 yrs. ago I got an 12x24. It was fine for a while but now I'm looking for something bigger. I just like to build small things like hopechests,toy cars,trucks,birdfeeders but I think I have too much wood laying around. I like to keep it in my shop because you never know when you will need it.I have a floor model bandsaw,a 2412 Ridgid tablesaw,a 13" ridgid planner, a 10" floor model radial arm saw,and a miter saw, also alot of other saws ,drills,grinders, ect.....Not counting my benches. My space is limited.My tools are on rollers too. O,well I just thought I'd tell you a little about my shop. If you can go any bigger it will pay off in the long run.............Donny

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          • #6
            Mine? A little over 24x20. It's too small also.

            I agree, if you're building build as large as practical. I have never heard anyone complain their shop is too large.

            Dave

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            • #7
              [QUOTE]Originally posted by Reggie:
              [QB]Hello Guys
              I will building a small shop (10x16) for my woodworking.

              I have the same size shop. While not the largest it has enought space for most project. Plan your layout well and you will find that their is space for everything. I have a table saw, full size band saw, floor model drill press, compound miter saw, router table, workbench, 13" planer, bench top jointer, cabinets, and work bench all in my space with room for large project assembly. Use your verticle space as much as you can. I build a loft for all my wood storage. Be sure to run plenty of outlets. I have 14 outlets in my building and could have used a few more. I layed out my benches so they are the same height as my saw for support on long rips.

              Good Luck,

              John

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              • #8
                Great comment on the electrical outlets! Just to add to it, make sure you don't load up one circuit will a bunch of outlets. That will cause overheating in the wires, overloading the breakers or worse a fire. I ran a separate 30 amp circuit for my stationary tools which required some heavy wire! I only use one tool at a time but I figured a 15 amp table saw and a 7.5 amp dust collector on one circuit (22.5 amps total) needed more than a 20 amp circuit. Note: most all residential indoor circuits are only 15 amps!

                PLEASE, if you don't know how to work electrical wiring get a licensed electrical contractor to do the work. It shouldn't cost much, certainly won't take them long, and will be to code which is an important thing. Pre-planning is key but I know you already knew that [img]smile.gif[/img]
                - Tim

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys, the plan is have subpanel installed with a 30amp for floor tools, 20 amp for bench and a couple of 15 for lights and accesories. My main concern is not having the lights go out if a trip a breaker for the power tools. I also plan on making the tablesaw and workbench mobile so that they can be placed against the wall when not in use to conserve space. I would love to make the shop larger but the surburan lots are really small. Thanks for the vertical space advice, I will work that in the plans. Any other suggestions will greatly be appreciated.
                  Reggie

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                  • #10
                    That is a very good point. I have a 100 Amp service out to my shop with a dedicated circuit for dust collection, one for lights, and two for tool use. All the tool circuits are 20 amps. Can never have too much power in a shop. Lots of outlets make it nice to plug in tools to dedicated outlets.

                    Good luck,

                    John

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                    • #11
                      If your shop is anything other than right next to your existing electric panel, running a sub panel makes sense. A single cable can bring 30A 220 to a sub-panel, which is both a head start on a 220 outlet for the TS2424 as well as all the 110 you're going to need. The only possibly hard part is the feed from the existing panel to the sub-panel; once you're there surface-mounted conduit to a few outlet boxes is quick and inexpensive. Just remember that in a sub-panel the neutral and the ground are NOT bonded!

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                      • #12
                        Reggie
                        I don't know why you need different amp circiuts for floor vs bench tools. If the floor tools do need 30 amp circuits it would supprise me. Check the rating if you use a 30 amp circuit for a 20 amp device the breaker will not trip if there is a problem the wire will melt first or the motor on the tool will be destroyed. Remember you only need what the tool is rated for and the breaker is no more than a protection device for both you and the tool so over rating it is not good but dangerous. I know this to be fact for I have worked in the electrical field over thirty years. If you would like to discuss further sent me an E-mail. Good luck with the new shop. [img]smile.gif[/img]

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