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  • Euro Style hinges

    I just finished making my first set of frameless cabinets and installing my first set of hidden Euro-style overlay hinges. Cheese Louise if I had known how easy those hinges were to install I would have suggested it to customers a long time ago. I don't like change but I am glad I bit the bullett on this and tried the hinges.

    I used Blum 170 degree clip hinges. I also installed the Blumotion plunge adapter so the doors don't slam shut, no more felt or little plastic bumps on the doors. Based on the chart for door thickness, 17mm plywood, in the Blum book I drilled the 35mm cup in the door 6mm from the edge, drilled the holes to screw the clips on 37mm from the cabinet edge, screwed everything together and clipped the doors on. It couldn't be easier. The hinges adjust in three dimensions so if I make a mistake there is some wiggle room. The hinges were $3.70 ea. and the clips were $.85 ea. I bet this style hinge with all the available adjustments would work great on inset doors.

    YEEE HAA! I am happy.

    Tom

  • #2
    Re: Euro Style hinges

    Thanks for the review, Tom. I've been curious about the Euro-style hinges for a while. Your review will certainly be a big factor in my decisions for my entertainment center. I definately will look into the bluemotion plunge adapter, too. I'd like to keep the face of the entertainment center looking as clean as I can.

    Where did you find the "Blum book" you mention? Did it come with your hinges?
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Euro Style hinges

      Blum makes the best hinges in the industry. I've used their system before and they are great.

      http://www.blum.com/group/en/03/02/i...JkAnR5kl31b:-1

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      • #4
        Re: Euro Style hinges

        VASandy,

        I got the "Blume book" from the distributor where I generally buy my plywood. There are a number of sections in the book which show the various items Blume sells - lots of unique items - and there are installation directions as well.

        I had to use the Blumotion plunger and adapter plate because the way the 170 degree hinges fold there is not room for the normal speed reducer. According to the book, and what the salesman at the distributor showed me, most of the Blume hinges have a small cut out in the hinge. An attachment with a plunge mechanism is clipped into the cut out and becomes an intergral part of the hinge. It seemed to me that the hinge attachment worked better than the plunge mechanism but I had not choice and the round plunger is a great second best.

        Blume sells adapter plates so that the plunger can be used on any style cabinet, frame of frameless. I bought some for the face frame cabinets in my kitchen, which have self closing hinges on the doors, and plan to install them. I have always disliked those felt and plastic bumpers on cabinet doors. I think this looks much better.

        Tom

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        • #5
          Re: Euro Style hinges

          Good topic here, been thinking about this for a while too, Tom did you use a jig when marking or drilling the hinge holes, or did you go by your measurements?
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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          • #6
            Re: Euro Style hinges

            Im brand new to woodworking and have no experience whatsoever, that being said, i used euro hinges for my first cabinet. Super easy. The ability to adjust them every which way is real nice.

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            • #7
              Re: Euro Style hinges

              I do refacing so I am nearly always putting new doors and hinges on existing cabinet boxes. The adjustment on the blum is impressive. When starting with boxes that have been installed funny, or installed years ago or shook by many Bay Area earthquakes, finding them square and plumb and level is almost a shock to the system. We get them with the 1/2" adjustment for 1/2" overlay, but if you are replacing doors on a funky existing box it's good to know that you can get them with 5/8", 3/4" or even more adjustment for more "wiggle room". I can usually hang and adjust around 15-20 doors an hour if I use a block under the bottom hinge for height jig. *this is when I have previously installed the hinges to the doors themselves*

              Now if I could just get the measure techs to get the ordering and drawings right my job would be easy!
              Last edited by woodenstickers; 04-29-2007, 11:47 AM.
              A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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              • #8
                Re: Euro Style hinges

                garager,

                I bought a small Blum marking jig but couldn't figure out how to use it. I then went to HD and bought a plastic marking jig which had a 35mm forestner bit with it for $11.00. The plastic jig marks the center of the 35mm cup hole so that the edge of the cup hole is 6mm from the door edge, which is what is required for 17mm, 3/4" nominal plywood. I had already measured 6mm from the door edge and when I placed the plastic jig on the door I felt good that my measurements were correct. I also bought a holder for one of my corded hand drills so that I could set the stop at 1/2" and drill at 90 degrees for the cup hole. Now that I have installed the hinges I probably won't bother with any of the marking jigs. It was just luck that the marking jig was set to 6mm and my hole needed a 6mm setback. The hingecup hole is drilled into the door with a setback that is based on the door thickness. A 17mm thick door requires a 6mm setback from the edge of the door to the edge of the 35mm cup hole. I lined up the clip on the cabinet frame 37mm to the center of the screw holes from the edge of the frame, drilled the holes, screwed the clip to the frame and snapped the doors on. This sounds far more complex than it is. It is easy.

                I don't know if I could do as many in an hour as woodenstickers and I wasn't aware that hinges with more adaptability were available. That is an intrinsic value of this forum. Learning from one another. Thanks woodenstickers.

                Tom

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                • #9
                  Re: Euro Style hinges

                  I work in a commercial cabinet shop and use hinges like these everyday. There are other brands Salice, Grass, etc. They all have the 3-way adjustments and are available for different applications too. Things like 45degree corners, bi-fold for inside corners (like lazy susan cabinets) or even to mount to a parallel panel, plus different off-sets for inset doors. They also come with different angles of opening.

                  One thing to note, because of all of the moving parts involved in these hinges, they are not as "solid" as traditional American style hinges. The door itself will flex a bit when installed. Weight and width of doors affets them too.
                  When your cabinet approaches 24 inches in width, use two doors instead of just one..........if possible.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Euro Style hinges

                    Just to clarify so I don't seem braggadocios, I was talking about hanging the doors only, not putting the hinges on the doors which I usually do the first day as I unpack them and check them for size and damage. They come pre-drilled for the hinge cups and screws about 80% of the time but when they don't I use a forester bit and mark by hand like Tom says he will do in the future. If it is a wood door I don't drill for the hinge screws--just screw the hinge directly with a #6 screw. If it is a composite laminate door I will drill for the hinge screws too.

                    I hang the door with the hinge on it already, then screw the hinged door to the frame. I have a block cut to rest the bottom hinge on so my height is uniform, then screw the hinge into the face frame. It is the method and practice that makes it go quick. I like the idea of not using the plastic bumpers but since I have either just veneered or laminated the faces with formica I need to protect the boxes from the doors rubbing as much as possible.

                    The cup drilling was very daunting the first time I had to do it in the field, but Tom is right, it is way easier than it seems. The potential to mess up is slim if you are careful, but if you do it would be a big deal.
                    Last edited by woodenstickers; 04-29-2007, 01:32 PM.
                    A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Euro Style hinges

                      I built a couple of shop cabinets and used Euro hinges from HD. 10 in a bag for 20 bucks. Worked great. As previously mentioned HD has the 35 mm (1 3/8 inch) drill bit at a very good price with the hinge template.
                      Start off slow then taper off.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Euro Style hinges

                        One caution when using a forstner bit to drill out the door panel:
                        Make sure you can get the depth without the center point of your bit going through the panel face. The hinges can be used in 5/8 thick material, but some 1 3/8 (35mm) bits will penetrate past 5/8. (ex I have a Freud PB-010 1 3/8 forstner bit. The center point extends 3/16" beyond the flat cutters. The hinges I had required a 1/2" recess. The door panel was 23/32" thick. Drilling to exactly 1/2" only left 1/32" from going through the face panel.)
                        Summary: drill a test piece first and don't get overly aggressive on the depth.

                        Go

                        PS I think the Freud bits are excellent bits and this is not to demean their quality. Just make sure what you have will work for the thickness of your door panel and the required hinge recess depth. The versatility of the hinge can let you get away with a small "design change" if you plane your stiles a bit thin, but the hinge requirements and tools may not allow the adjustment.
                        Last edited by Gofor; 04-29-2007, 08:15 PM.
                        Practicing at practical wood working

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