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Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

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  • Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

    I Googled my way into this forum via a search "Staining Maple". I came across an archived 2002 rigidformum thread that had to do with my title. http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/arc...hp/t-4619.html
    It was posted by a Dave Arbuckle, so if he is still part of this forum maybe he, or anyone else for that matter, could answer a question that was not addressed. The person submitting the question was doing just what I am planning to do: making an entertainment center with a combination of maple ply and solid maple. When finishing he discovered that the two materials did not take stain in the same way and that the solid maple was much more resistant to pigmented stain. Dave A. suggested to use an (analine) dye (on the solid maple).

    But if the solid maple will be more deeply stained, won't the maple ply be proportionately more deeply stained? And, if you use pigmented stain on the ply and dye on the solid maple, how do you get the two totally different products to match color? Would I best experiment with sanding sealer or something like Zinsser's Seal Coat to inhibit dye absorbtion on the ply?

  • #2
    Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

    Hi Pseudo, welcome to the forums!!

    It's going to take some experimentation to do what you're trying to do. I'd try the sanding sealer first, and see what kind of results that gets.

    Wish I had better advice...hopefully someone with more experience will be along soon!!!
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

      Originally posted by VASandy View Post
      Hi Pseudo, welcome to the forums!!

      It's going to take some experimentation to do what you're trying to do. I'd try the sanding sealer first, and see what kind of results that gets.

      Wish I had better advice...hopefully someone with more experience will be along soon!!!
      Welcome Pseudo, VASandy gave you good advice there, 1 or 2 coats of sanding sealer should help the stain from absorbing in to deep, if you go that route I'm afraid the best way to get to the level of matching is practice. Be sure to sand lightly ofter each coat. I have tried this method a couple of years ago, and my results was pretty darn close, I was very impressed with the results. Did a kitchen cabinet (Maple), new to old and the owners were very pleased with the results. Of course I lost my butt with that bid, however I learned this technique (researched the internet) which I thought was price less. You wont get it to be 100% match, unless you have that trained eye, practice and you will see your results. Sanding sealer should be your best method, but I'm sure there is an old timer in here that might have a better technique (diluting maybe). Let us know what method your going to try and your results, I'm not the finishing expert but I try my best for the best finished look like everyone else here, which were all graded upon when were done. I will watch this thread with much enthusiasm, and possibly more advice to give you, or we will all learn from someone else's technique. I haven't tried the sanding courser method, but I do know it works on wooden floors, big mistake I did in my own home about 5 years ago. Floor was so uneven I could litterly tell where the sander was sanding and where it wasn't really touching, major dark blotches every where. Had to lay carpet over my mistake and swore to myself I will let someone else do that job in the future. Either way, its all about practice, good luck.
      Last edited by garager; 05-01-2007, 09:13 PM.
      Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

      http://www.contractorspub.com

      A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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      • #4
        Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

        Thanks for the help. That gives me a couple of techniques to start practicing with. I came across another one on a different woodworker website last night too. The person said to "water pop" the wood...but didn't explain what the process was After further searching I discovered it seemed to be the use of a wet sponge on solid wood to raise the grain opening it up so as to accept more stain. Don't know what we would do without the computer! There's a wealth of info out there.

        Well, it may be a while since I still have yet to build this critter but all these methods give me things to experiment with in the meantime.

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        • #5
          Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

          Another option is a gel stain. With gels there is little penetration into the wood, it actually forms a film on top of the surface. The gel is thick bodied (hence gel) and is workable for extended time compared to liquid stain, you can also deepen light areas by applying another coat of gel once the base coat is dry.

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          • #6
            Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

            If you are trying to get a darker color finish, i.e. "Olde Maple" vs. something more like natural maple color (blonde) then you may have to resort to a product like Minwax's PolyShades which is polyurethane with pre-mixed stain. Using this product (PolyShades) there will be very little penetration of the colorant into the wood and you'll find it easy to achieve a more uniform color with mixed woods.

            The downsides are that the product is much more difficult to apply than traditional polyurethane (practice makes perfect) and you will be unable to do any surface leveling by sanding because you'll quickly remove the color with any but only the lightest scuff sanding (I use 000 or finer steel wool).

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            • #7
              Re: Staining Maple and Maple Veneer Ply

              I would use water soluble aniline dye powder. Why? Because the clarity is better, for one thing. And in your case, the ability to dilute the dye to varying degrees would be quite useful.

              You can apply a very diluted solution of it to both surfaces first. Then apply more of it to the areas that need to be darker. You can also wipe over an area with a wet cloth to lighten it, if need be.

              This is a mix of solid birdseye and veneer that was dyed a red mahogany color:

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