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  • #16
    Re: oven cleaner

    Hmmm... don't know if oven cleaner can ruin the carbide bond but it can definately do stuff to some metals. I used it to remove hard anodizing from aluminum parts. Does anyone actually use oven cleaner to clean ovens?
    A little note on simple green. Don't leave blades soaking in it overnight when cleaning them. Not that there's any reason to do so but as a cyclist simple green is often used to clean bike chains. Soaking the steel bike chains in it for extended periods causes the steel to go brittle and the links break.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: oven cleaner

      Some oven cleaner (ie original Easy-Off, etc) is Sodium Hydroxide, a very strong alkaloid. It will destroy aluminum (ref Velosapiens thread). Acid cleaners will cause hydrogen embrittlement in high strength steel. Don't know if either hurts cobalt or brazing material for carbide.

      That said: Greased Lightning (also and alkaline cleaner), will quickly dissolve pine and wood sap/resin from saw blades. Denatured alcohol also works very well. I use the DNA if its a light build-up, and greased lightening after doing something like a deck, framing, etc. Haven't lost any teeth from my saw blades yet, (except for one knocked off a Diablo blade by a lighter pine knot!, and that blade had not been cleaned).

      Go
      Practicing at practical wood working

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: oven cleaner

        I used to use oven cleaner all the time and it worked great, and quickly. But some time ago I read an article about using it on saw blades and I saw some magnified pictures of the damage that Sodium hydroxide (NaOH), also known as lye or caustic soda that's in the oven cleaner, does to the brazing on the blades. It's best not to use it, and stick with something milder like simple green or similar cleaners.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: oven cleaner

          Originally posted by papadan View Post
          Proof required. Silly thread that nobody has offered any proof of, just hear-say. LMAO

          “Quote”
          “Definitely avoid oven cleaner and other caustics. They attack the cobalt binder in the carbide and can lead to carbide failure (translates to tiny missiles of carbide at 100+ mph). Also, Freud and some other brands of blades have a tri-metal brazing foil that uses copper alloy for a cushioning layer. The copper can also be affected by these cleaners (translates to larger missiles of carbide). We recommend soaking overnight in kerosene in a vented container and using a stiff nylon bristle brush to clean. Teflon coated plates will clean up with a soapy cloth (except for the teeth as mentioned earlier). There are commercial blade cleaning products that are not caustic but we don't officially sanction them. I've personally used Simple Green concentrate with good results.

          Charles M
          Freud, Inc

          “End Quote”

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: oven cleaner

            My point has been made. Some say the braze is attacked, some say the carbide. No proof to any of it. I found several teeth missing from the original blade that came on my Ridgid saw. That blade was never removed or cleaned, but still lost some teeth.
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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            • #21
              Re: oven cleaner

              This link has pics and all.

              http://www.carbideprocessors.com/Brazing/book/11.htm
              www.TheWoodCellar.com

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: oven cleaner

                Originally posted by Rafael View Post
                So I guess we can officially now call that "Proof"...
                Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                http://www.contractorspub.com

                A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: oven cleaner

                  The proof is in the pudding. But I would never put oven cleaner in pudding.

                  From experience I know the Lye will eat/destroy certain types of metals. Depending on the concentration it can do it very slowly or somewhat quickly. It basically looks for something it likes to react with.
                  I just know there are many good ways to clean sawblades that will not damage the blade, so why use lye?
                  www.TheWoodCellar.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: oven cleaner

                    I think it works on bodies as well, oh forget I even said that.
                    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                    http://www.contractorspub.com

                    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: oven cleaner

                      Originally posted by Rafael View Post
                      Yep this link proves that metal not properly cleaned cannot be properly welded. Thought everyone knew that.
                      info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: oven cleaner

                        Does anybody remember when you could buy Lye in the grocerie store ?

                        Now does anybody remember what the shelf that the Lye was on looked like ?

                        that should give you your answer on how Lye interacts with metal.



                        and just for thoes of you who dont remember the shelf that the cans of lye were sitting on were usualy made of metal and were pitted and had been eaten away at by the lye. so what does that tell you that lye does to metal.

                        LOL
                        American by birth. Canadian at heart.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: oven cleaner

                          Ask a plumber what Lye does to metal. There has to be a few on this site somewhere.
                          www.TheWoodCellar.com

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: oven cleaner

                            Actually, lye (aka quick-lime: used to dissolve all the waste at old slaughterhouses) and also known as NaOH (sodium hydroxide: draino crystals) does not corrode steel or iron. It has been used for years to remove coatings (enamel, lacquer, etc) + grease + rust from iron and cast iron. When you used to go get your cast-iron engine block "boiled out", they dipped it in heated NaOH, because it would do all operations at once.
                            However, it does react with other metals. It will eat aluminum up. The fact that it was used for years as drain cleaner in systems with brass fittings indicates that it not being recommended on carbide saw blades may be because the brazing material contains some aluminum in the alloy. (aluminum is a lot cheaper than silver, which used to be a component).

                            Regardless: One caution if you use NaOH: Wear Eye Protection. One splash of it in your eye CAN (not WILL) cause a degenerative condition resulting in blindness that cannot be reversed. As I said, it used to be used in slaughter houses to dissolve the bones, hide, etc that at that time were not recycled into hotdogs and pet food.

                            Go
                            Practicing at practical wood working

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: oven cleaner

                              The saying is actually, "The proof of the pudding is in the eating." Don't eat the oven cleaner. Also, I have never found it necessary to soak my sawblades for a long time. I make a strong solution of Simple Green and water, dip the blade in it (or sometimes just wipe it on with a soaking sponge), wait a minute, and then scrub with one of those little nylon or brass bristle brushes. Then rinse, wipe with a rag, spray with WD-40 to get rid of the water residue, and wipe again. If your blade needs a long soaking, you have probably waited much too long to clean it, and it has not been cutting very well during that time.
                              Joe Spear

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: oven cleaner

                                This months issue of Shop Notes (arrived at home yesterday) has an article on cleaning and maintenance of Saw blades. I have not read it yet, but should prove to be intresting reading after reading through all of this.

                                Regards,

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