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My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

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  • My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

    Hi again, all -

    Thanks to this forum, I finally got my new 3650 up and running! WOO-HOO! I included a picture of it for you, plus a picture of my old ProTech table saw for comparison. (Actually, there is no comparison...)

    Thanks again for all of the help in these threads. I couldn't have done it without it. Overall assembly was pretty good, with the Herc-U-Lift being the hardest part because of the directions. Took me parts of three nights to do it, but she sounds good. Much quieter than I thought (MUCH quieter than the direct-drive ProTech) and it cuts like a champ.

    So here are a few questions for you:

    1. The fence squeaks pretty loud as it moves over the front rail. It moves pretty easily but makes a loud squeak when it does. Normal because it's new or not? Anything I can do to lube the rails?

    2. I know there are better blades out there (I read the thread started by Smelly about blades), but is the original Ridgid blade good at all? Save for rough work, okay for all work, or get rid of it?

    3. How much "truing up" did you need to do with the trunions, etc.? I've never owned a saw like this let alone messed with trunion settings so I don't want to make more of an issue. It seems really good right now, so I'm wondering if that is even possible. How did yours come from the factory?

    4. I used mineral spirits to remove the packing lube, then put on two coats of Johnson's paste wax. I can still see slight smudges at an angle. This doesn't bother me, but I want to make sure it is okay. Too much wax, not enough, just right? It sure glides nice and I have no complaints about that.

    Thanks again for everything. I'm happy to call myself an official Ridgid 3650 owner and user!

    Regards,

    Mike
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

    Hi Northern Wood
    1. Try waxing the rails, if that doesn't work than you need to check your rail distance apart make sure their the same, and check the bottom of your fence that it has the same gape size all the way along the table top surface. You might have to readjust alittle.
    2. Ridgid blade, I only use when what I'm cutting doesn't matter.
    3. Truing up, I guess I was one of the lucky ones.
    4. Light smudges, don't worry about them, or if you have a buffer then try to buff it out. To much wax will get on your good lumber and it can ruin your finish job. I do buff mine, for that piece of mind.
    Extra note- make sure everything is square and aligned correctly, belt tension is good, then make lots of saw dust... Hows the lift working for you, pretty cool huh. Congratulation on your new saw, safety first...Garager...
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

      Congrats Northern Wood. Looks nice and I am sure you will enjoy it. I don't have a lot of feedback for you, but thought I would toss out what I thinks for what it is worth...



      1. The fence squeaks pretty loud as it moves over the front rail. It moves pretty easily but makes a loud squeak when it does. Normal because it's new or not? Anything I can do to lube the rails?
      I also wax my rails. But are you sure it is the rails squeeking and that that the fence is not rubbing the table top? I had the problem and was fixed after a slight adjustment of the rails.

      2. I know there are better blades out there (I read the thread started by Smelly about blades), but is the original Ridgid blade good at all? Save for rough work, okay for all work, or get rid of it?
      I thought the Ridgid blade did OK for me. Now that I have upgraded to better blades since then I can see a true difference. But I still use the original blade for rough work and simple rips and think it works fine for that.

      3. How much "truing up" did you need to do with the trunions, etc.? I've never owned a saw like this let alone messed with trunion settings so I don't want to make more of an issue. It seems really good right now, so I'm wondering if that is even possible. How did yours come from the factory?
      I did not need to do any adjustments of my trunions, but several others on here have reported they needed to tighten them up at the least. And some more recent posts seem to say some adjustments were necessary. Mine is about as perfect as it can get and came that way right out of the box. Maybe I was just lucky! If you have a dial guage that is a good way to quickly check for any needed adjustments.

      4. I used mineral spirits to remove the packing lube, then put on two coats of Johnson's paste wax. I can still see slight smudges at an angle. This doesn't bother me, but I want to make sure it is okay. Too much wax, not enough, just right? It sure glides nice and I have no complaints about that.
      I usually use 2 coats of paste wax myself. My saw has some cosmetic scratches and smudges from use and time. I don't expect it to look brand new forever, it is a tool. I doubt you need to worry about the smudges you see. I believe others on here also use Top Coat or BioSheild on their cast iron as well and will let them offer their advice there. I haven't found the need to do anything other than wax as of yet.


      Enjoy the saw and post some pics of your projects!
      Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

        A good blade, good alignment, and a zero clearance insert will dictate the end performance of the saw. The stock blade is typical...not that good. It's a matter of opinion, but I wouldn't use it where furniture grade results are desired.

        There are a couple of different philosophies about blade types...both are valid with pros and cons on each side. A single general purpose blade to handle most cuts means that you can leave one blade on the saw and still get acceptable results in a wide range of cuts in a wide range of materials, assuming it's a good quality blade. It also means that the blade is designed to be versatile and will not perform as well in the extreme ranges as a task specific blade used for it's intended purpose. A high quality 80T crosscut blade will make cleaner crosscuts than a comparable quality 40T or 50T general purpose or combo blade. Just as a good 24T rip blade will cut more aggressively and efficiently in thick woods than will the 40T or 50T general purpose or combo blade. The downside to the task specific is their lack of versatility. The 80T crosscut blade will be prone bogging the saw and burning on rip cuts, and the rip blade will leave a rougher cut on everything and will splinter badly on crosscuts....you need to change the blade for each type of cut to the correct blade for optimum results.

        I tend to use a top shelf 40T(WWII), 50T (Infinity), or 60T (LU88) blade for most general applications (I've got lots to choose from but any one would do fine), and a decent 24T ripper for thick rips or lots of bulk ripping....those are the 2 blades I'd consider essential for my needs. I get glue ready cuts from my primary blades on just about everything I cut, so I don't see a need to change blades to a higher tooth count blade. I don't get glueable edges from the ripper but use that for bulk work to spare my motor and save the good blade for more critical applications. I rarely use my 80T crosscut blade, but if you cut alot of fine hardwood plywood or veneers, you may find one beneficial.

        There's also some debate about kerf width...3/32" thin kerf (TK) or 1/8" full kerf. Most manufacturers that offer both kerfs will suggest using the TK on saws of less than 3hp (real) hp. The argument is that theoretically a TK has a higher probability of deflecting than a full kerf due to it's thinner body, while the full kerf blade takes a wider bite and puts proportionately more strain on the saw motor so the feedrate is slower. In practice, I've used over 20 high quality TK blades and have never encountered deflection issue...I think the key is the quality level and improved metallurgy of modern blades. I've also used many full kerfs, and get comparable cut quality from both...I own both and heavily favor the TK's for the ease of feeding on my saw....if I had a 3-5hp cabinet saw, I'd most likely use a full kerf. Some folks are just more comfortable using the full kerf even on a smaller saw like the 3650 b/c of past deflection issues from years back or from cheaper TK's... others just find the math easier with the 1/8" kerf.

        Do some research and go with what makes the most sense to you, but whichever route you choose, aim for top shelf quality even if it costs a bit more....you're not likely to find that topquality level of performance from the big boxes, though you can find "good " quality.
        Last edited by hewood; 05-05-2007, 09:00 AM.

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        • #5
          Re: My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

          I also replaced a ProTek with the 3650 just over a month ago. You're right there really isn't any comparison, but, wow, square cuts! Major improvement. I too had some concerns when I read about the problems and adjustments some folks experienced, but, like you, everything seemed to be properly set up and square from the start.

          After reading some of the advice and comments from the experienced folks on this forum I will be buying task specific blades and adding some zero clearance inserts. The 3650 has certainly made working on my amateur projects a lot more pleasant. Enjoy your new equipment.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: My new 3650! (and a couple of questions)

            Not much more to add behind these guys. I'm new to the forum as well and have learned a lot from them! I have just recently became a 3650 owner as well, and am familiar with your squeak. The squeak on my saw was created by those white plastic glides on the fence that actually come in contact with the rails. I made sure my all of my alignments were good using an "a-lign-it" (worth it's weight in gold) but still had the sqeak. Once I waxed the rails and made some dust the noise worked itself out with some wear to those glides.

            Congrats on the new saw!

            Hope it helps...
            Last edited by mmatchinga; 05-09-2007, 10:11 AM.

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