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  • Making Rough Cut?

    Short of using a REALLY BAD blade, is there a way to produce 'rough cut' lumber on a table saw? I don't know how it's done at a mill. Guessing a band saw?
    "A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools" - Douglas Adams

  • #2
    Re: Making Rough Cut?

    Originally posted by Saw Dust View Post
    Short of using a REALLY BAD blade, is there a way to produce 'rough cut' lumber on a table saw? I don't know how it's done at a mill. Guessing a band saw?
    I'm guessing you want that ruff cut look? I would have to say your ruff cut look is because the wood is wet, so my guess is to soak it, cut it and dry it flat. Wet lumber is dangerous on a table saw, safety first. The really ruff cut look is from saw blades, band saw blades will give you a smoother cut.
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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    • #3
      Re: Making Rough Cut?

      For many reasons I think you are asking for trouble by using a "Bad Blade." Not the least of which is the wood being lifted by the back of the blade and thrown back at you. The safest, and only, way I know of to produce the rough sawn look is with a bandsaw. Take a pair of pliers and put a small crimp in the blade, one crimp will usually do but you may wish to experiment and crimp it in a couple places. My bandsaw has bearings as opposed to cool blocks and I haven't experienced any problems caused by the crimp in the blade rubbing on the bearings. That said I haven't used the technique often and of course the blade is ruined. Cool blocks may wear prematurely because of the crimp I don't know. Bandsaws are pretty cheap and there are a variety of benchtop models available that don't take up much room. If you don't own one maybe you can ask a buddy to use his. As you wait in the Emergency Room for a doc to stitch your hand up because as the board lifted it turned and pulled your hand into the blade you may think an investment in a bandsaw is cheap compared to loosing some days of work: to say nothing of the pain.

      Please think long and hard before intentionally using a "bad blade."

      Tom

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      • #4
        Re: Making Rough Cut?

        A low tooth count BS blade will do it best if yo can do it with little drift. A very low tooth count TS blade (4-10T) might get you there.

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        • #5
          Re: Making Rough Cut?

          If you have a old steel blade you could knock two teeth over with extra set,

          It is rough lumber because it is cut with coarse wide spaced teeth,

          If you have one tooth set a 1/32 extra on a 10" blade it will leave a cut that is rough like a saw mill blade would, do it on both sides probably opposite 180 degrees apart, one to the left and one to the right, so it will still cut straight, and not load the saw in one location of the blade.


          use a very sharp blade, and cut fast, the fewer the teeth on the blade the better,

          it being wet wood will dry with some shrinkage in the cuts as well, but the newer type band saw mills can cut wood some times as smooth as some table saw cuts,

          on the small band saw mills the tooth spacing is about 7/8 of and inch, and on the commercial mills it can 3 to 4 inches between teeth, and some of the commercial mills have two sided blades that can cut both ways.
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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          • #6
            Re: Making Rough Cut?

            Thx guys for all the info. Just kidding bout that bad blade!

            Sounds like a bit of work to get that look on the table saw, and far beyond my means to do safely being a sub-novice. untill the band saw makes it way into my shop, I think I'll take a trip down to Amish country for some rough cut.

            The reason I ask, I picked up a couple of small picture frames made from what looks to be very old rough cut wood. They have a nice warm and weathered look. Perfect for the patio!

            "A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools" - Douglas Adams

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            • #7
              Re: Making Rough Cut?

              Found a great source for rough cut, pallets!

              My first TS project, not counting feather board, is a display for a few Musky lures. Not really a project as much as a need to stop looking and start using.
              I don't have a planer yet so the halved joints very in fit...adds to the weathered look IMHO.

              "A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools" - Douglas Adams

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