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  • Paint & Stain...

    I'm making a toybox out of oak. I used a router to engrave a name on the front of it. I'll be staining the toybox, probably with an oil based stain, but i'd like to paint the letters black so they stand out. Does anyone know if it would be best to paint the letters before or after i stain, and also what kind of paint would work best? I also toyed with the idea of woodburning a few little designs on the toybox, but i don't know if that should be done before or after i stain either.

  • #2
    Re: Paint & Stain...

    Personally, I think I'd route, then paint (using tape to make sure the paint stays only in the letters). Wait a good while for the paint to dry well, at least 24 hrs. Then tape the letters and stain. Then poly the entire thing.

    Woodburning should be done before stain, I think.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Paint & Stain...

      this is how the plumber would do it:

      first use the router to create the letters.

      next use the paint to spray the cut letters black. concentrate on the letters, don't worry on the overspray.

      use a sander, belt or r.o.s. to quickly clean off the overspray.

      last stain and finish.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Re: Paint & Stain...

        DBS

        About what size are the letters? If pretty small, you might try a small artist's brush and paint the letters with black paint. Like Rick said, you can sand off any that ends up where you don't want it once the paint dries. If you do any wood burning, I would do that only on RAW wood. You'll hate the fumes otherwise.

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        • #5
          Re: Paint & Stain...

          I don't think spray painting is really an option, unless i was able to do a damn good job taping off the letters, I think black spray paint would soak right into the oak, and be very difficult to sand out. I like the idea of brush painting them, but i don't know what kind of paint would work the best with the stain.

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          • #6
            Re: Paint & Stain...

            Prime your letterings first, stain the rest of the box. When staining is done take some cotton balls and wipe out the stain in the letterings (as good as you can). When staining is dry, give letterings 2 coats of paint, then poly or whatever for your finish. When priming and painting do use tape.
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            • #7
              Re: Paint & Stain...

              A lot is going to depend on the porosity of the wood and red oak can be a bear to stain, especially with a penetrating oil stain. It is notorious for bleeding back to the surface, resulting in blotches. For this reason, the red oak is often treated with a "sealer" before applying the stain, and gel stain is often the recommended stain to use... however, I must state that I am not an expert with this. But my experience refinishing and trying to stain red oak in my house rennovation has been a bit challenging.

              I would think the same concerns would apply to painting any carved or routed into red oak. With my luck, it would bleed back to the surface at some unsightly spot, especially if the paint were too thin. If the wood has been sealed, than that shouldn't be a problem.

              From my limited experience, I think I'd be inclined to stain first and even apply the first coat of poly. This would give the paint a more even surface which would make for a cleaner edge, and also enable better control should you need to wipe clean any spot where you "went outside" the letters. After the paint cured, I'd apply your remaining coat(s) of poly.

              Whatever you do, I think I would take a scrap piece of the oak and give it a try first.

              CWS

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              • #8
                Re: Paint & Stain...

                Aniline Dye is another option
                http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...at=1,190,42996

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                • #9
                  Re: Paint & Stain...

                  Use a paint that is compatible with the finish your going to use, or not coat the painted surface with a top coat,

                  if your going to use poly to finish with, I would use a "oil base floor paint" as most are pigmented poly and there would not be the problem with non compatible materials, and adhesion, (except for the normal problems with poly and waiting to long between coats),

                  If your going to use oils or other varnishes, then I would choose a paint that is compatible with them, you may even want to call the manufacture of the preferred product and see what there tech., services recommend.

                  The problem I see with oak and spray paint is the pours of the grain being coarse in the oak would receive paint and would show black or what ever color is painted, and could not be sanded off, if it was maple or birch, not a bad Idea.
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                  • #10
                    Re: Paint & Stain...

                    I have heard Plaster of Paris is a good grain filler for Oak. If you do not use a grain filler, and it is red oak, go back after you stain (about 20 minutes) and rewipe the oil stain that bleeds out of the pores. Red oak has open pores that run the full length of the grain. White oak does not, so is easier to stain.

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