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  • TS2400 vs. TS3650

    I've just read MSchenker's review of the TS2400 vs. Bosch 4000. Many thank MS! I'm looking to purchase a TS in the very near future and both saws were on my short-list! I’ve been looking for a table saw to initially aid in making storage cabinets, wall/floor cabinets, etc.

    The other saw on my short-list is the TS3650. My question today is: Can the 2400 do everything the 3650 can? My main concerns are:

    • Quality of work
    • Longevity/durability
    • Mobility
    • Space requirements

    As this will be my only TS for the foreseeable future, I’m looking for something that can grow with me as my skills improve. I anticipate doing most of my work in my basement, where I will have to pull it out and move it to whever the space is available on that given day.

    BTW- I have a gift certificate options at both HD and Sears, but I saw nothing comparable at Sears at the same price or cheaper.

    Thanks,

    Bob

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rhauser44:
    The other saw on my short-list is the TS3650. My question today is: Can the 2400 do everything the 3650 can? My main concerns are:

    • Quality of work
    • Longevity/durability
    • Mobility
    • Space requirements

    As this will be my only TS for the foreseeable future, I’m looking for something that can grow with me as my skills improve. I anticipate doing most of my work in my basement, where I will have to pull it out and move it to whever the space is available on that given day.

    BTW- I have a gift certificate options at both HD and Sears, but I saw nothing comparable at Sears at the same price or cheaper.

    Thanks,

    Bob
    These saws are in two different classifications. There are some pros and cons with each depending on what's most important to you, but both should cut wood well. The 2400 is a jobsite saw that excels at portability and space saving. Typically contractor saws are preferred as the primary saw for wwing in a shop with advantages in noise level, mass and stability, table size, longevity, and even some advantages in cut quality. A mobile base on a contractor saw improves mobility to roll it across the shop, but they're still a major appliance to move from site to site. The Herc lift on the 3650 should work fine within your shop. I'd pick the 3650 hands down for what you describe as the intended use.

    • Quality of work (3650)
    • Longevity/durability (3650)
    • Mobility (2400)
    • Space requirements (2400)

    Comment


    • #3
      Bob,
      The TS2400 is an excellent saw. After using it for several projects, I feel even better about it than I did in that very positive review you read! For a bench-top, it has very little vibration and is really solid. It has great power as well. The fence system has continued to be a joy to use. I use it as a dedicated shop saw.

      I should tell you that neither the TS3650 nor the TS2400 are good for ripping full sheets of plywood. For that, I use my Festool system. Just so you know. I say this just in case you are wondering whether the TS3650 would make a big difference there -- it won't.

      Here are the limitations I see with the TS2400 for regular hobby woodworking:
      1. Aluminum table instead of cast-iron. Actually, this is not a weakness for me. I don't care, as long as it's flat and smooth, which it is!
      2. Smaller table surface. Overall surface area is larger on the TS3650, but not enough to make a difference in large ripping operations, as I mentioned above. You do get about 3.5" more space in front of the blade with the TS3650, which can mean a lot for certain operations.
      3. 25" rip capacity on the TS2400 or 36" rip capacity on the TS3650. This is a non-issue for me, as I can rip a 50"-wide pieve in half if I needed to.
      4. 3 1/8" maximum cutting height on the TS2400 or 3 3/8" maximum cutting height on the TS3650. I have come nowhere near cutting this high!
      5. Noise level is higher with the TS2400. This shouldn't matter since you're wearing ear protection, right?

      Both of these are great saws. I really worked it over in my mind which one to get. But in the end, the TS2400 did everything I needed a table saw to do, and used less space. But the price difference is small enough (about $100) so it's a close call!

      If 25" rip capacity is enough, and you have a limited shop size, I say get the TS2400. It's got to be the best one out there right now.

      But if you feel that a heavier machine is better, with more cast-iron and a greater rip capacity, I would say get the TS3650.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hewood & MSchenker,

        Thank you both for your well-thought replies. While I like the potential portability of the 2400, I think the 3650 would be a better choice for a primary TS.

        Though, I'll have to spend some time in the basement tonight with a tape measure and plan where I can put that beauty. I'm sure it will be a typical "move this, shove that, and toss that other thing out".

        Thanks again,

        I'll let you know when I'll be getting it. I'm sure I'll have a ton of questions!!

        Comment


        • #5
          The better portables (Ridgid, Bosch, DeWalt, PC, Sears, Makita) are great if you need to tote them with you, but beyond that there aren't many advantages over a good cast iron saw if you've got the room for one. Both Wood Mag and Popular WWing have pointed out the shortcomings of the portables. Even though they're very good, they just don't have the build to be any more precise.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have had my 2400 for several years now. If I needed a new saw today it would be another 2400. It has the power and accuracy to handle any job you can throw at it. Very portable to move around the shop or get it out of the way completely. That is the only downside of the 3650.
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

            Comment


            • #7
              Both Wood Mag and Popular WWing have pointed out the shortcomings of the portables. Even though they're very good, they just don't have the build to be any more precise.
              I respectfully disagree. Honestly, I can't imagine further accuracy than what the TS2400 provides. To be clear, I use an Incra 1000SE miter gauge. But still, when I do miter cuts on the TS2400, they are absolutely perfect. The table also has almost non-existent vibration.

              Not all portables are equal. I would agree with you and the magazines on the Makita and Bosch, which I tested. I actually owned a Bosch for a while, and I played with a Makita on a job site one day. I've also looked at other portables which do not have fences or table surfaces equal to the TS2400. The miter slots on the other portables are sloppy, the saws vibrate a lot more, and the fences are not as smooth.

              I reall believe that Ridgid has created a bench-top table saw that is attempting to rival contractor saws in smoothness and accuracy.

              With all that said, there may be other things the TS3650 provides that I am not aware of. I'm just saying that accuracy is not an issue at all with the TS2400.

              [ 08-19-2005, 11:48 AM: Message edited by: MSchenker ]

              Comment


              • #8
                Honestly, I can't imagine further accuracy than what the TS2400 provides. To be clear, I use an Incra 1000SE miter gauge. But still, when I do miter cuts on the TS2400, they are absolutely perfect. The table also has almost non-existent vibration.

                ...there may be other things the TS3650 provides that I am not aware of. I'm just saying that accuracy is not an issue at all with the TS2400.
                Thanks MSchenker, I don't plan on adding an after-market fence for quite a while, but it's good to hear the faith you put in the accuracy of the 2400.

                If I go with the 2400, I can probably devise work-arounds for any perceived short-comings between it and the 3650, but it would be hard to devise a substitute for accuracy.

                Papadan & Knot me -- Thanks for your input as well, the portability of the 2400 continues to make this a tough choice.

                That said, I'll have to look at the available space in my basement, as space may be what it will all boil down to.

                Comment


                • #9
                  MSchenker, I'm not disagreeing with you about your claim about the accuracy of the 2400 but at least some of the credit belongs to the accuracy of your Incra 1000SE. If the 2400's stock miter guage is as sloppy as the stock miter guage that came with my 3612 than miter accuracy can be a hit or miss proposition. Of course, the same could be said of the 3650 and many other OEM miter guages.
                  Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MSchenker:
                    </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr /> Both Wood Mag and Popular WWing have pointed out the shortcomings of the portables. Even though they're very good, they just don't have the build to be any more precise.
                    I respectfully disagree. Honestly, I can't imagine further accuracy than what the TS2400 provides. </font>[/QUOTE]You disagree that the mags pointed out the weaknesses?

                    I respect your opinion of the 2400, but I was essentially noting that both articles mentioned the shortcomings of that class of saw relative to contractor saws...not just stating my opinion. Wood Mag rated the 2400 and other jobsites saws in it's mid priced TS comparison along side the contractor saws. The 2400 did well in some categories, but all the jobsite saw ranked behind all the contractor saws in blade scoring. The Pop WWing articled noted that the jobsite saws are more prone to flexing under pressure due to the nature of their construction. That seems perfectly logical to me. Aluminum, nylon, and plastic have some weight advantages over cast iron and cast aluminum, but no strength advantages that I'm aware of. There's also some disadvantages with the direct drive systems of jobsite saws that translates to more vibration and scoring however slight....if the 2400 is direct drive. I'm happy that you're happy with your 2400, and I'm not taking shots at it or any jobsite saw or saying they won't cut well, but considering that the 2400 is ~ $500 and the 3650 is ~ $570, aside from portability and space issues, I still see no advantages to going with the 2400 or any jobsite over the 3650 or any decent CS in most cases. 37 years from now someone will likely still be using the original cabinet, table, and trunnions from a 3650...the fence and motor might even survive, but it's difficult to imagine there being much left of a jobsite saw after that long and it probably won't be worth repairing.

                    Just my view with some published data to back it...

                    [ 08-19-2005, 01:07 PM: Message edited by: Knot Me ]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      BadgerDave wrote:
                      MSchenker, I'm not disagreeing with you about your claim about the accuracy of the 2400 but at least some of the credit belongs to the accuracy of your Incra 1000SE.
                      I agree. The Ridgid stock miter gauge was not worth using. But still, the point remains that I got great results with the TS2400. With the Bosch, even with the Incra 1000SE, the miter cuts were lousy. Bottom line, I can't imagine better cuts than I get with the TS2400. Let's say I were to get the TS3650. How much more perfect can I get? I've done some very sensitive miter cuts on a few projects already, and the TS2400 has been just about flawless.

                      But I'm not knocking the TS3650. For me, because of the space issue, I went with the TS2400. But like I said, it was a tough choice. The TS3650 looks like an excellent machine, and it probably has advantages I'm unaware of. But accuracy just isn't one of them.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Knot Me,
                        I don't question your opinion. Sorry if it seemed that way. We're both just stating our opinions. The idea is to put our experiences out there so we can help other people make a decision on which saw to buy.

                        It's not you. But I'm irked by some of the reviews in the woodworking magazines. Sorry, but something fishy is going on if they are consistently rating the Bosch 4000 ahead of the Ridgid TS2400. This is not in the realm of opinion. This is plain measurable fact.

                        Weight and thickness of the tables, as you stated, is important. Well, I measured the Ridgid table with a dial caliper, and it is noticeably thicker than the Bosch or the Makita. Not one review I read even mentioned this.

                        The miter slots in the Bosch and the Makita (at least the one I saw on a job site) were inconsistent from front to back. The Ridgid's is right on.

                        The reviews I saw called the Bosch fence equal to or better than the Ridgid. Were they using the same saw I am using?

                        Like I've said all along, the TS3650 probably has advantages I'm unaware of. Don't get me wrong on this. The TS3650 looks like a terrific saw. In no way am I trying to say that the TS2400 is better than the TS3650. I'm only speaking about the accuracy I've seen. If I were to buy a TS3650, maybe I'd be converted!

                        You make an excellent point about the price difference. It's so little, I would say that if you have the space for it, just get the TS3650. But if you don't have the space, and you are thinking of a bench-top saw, get the Ridgid TS2400.

                        As far as longevity goes, maybe you're right. I'm not too worried about what will be left of any of my tools beyond a 7- to 10-year window, to be honest.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          MSchenker - I think we can agree about the mags...I don't know if anything fishy is going on or not, but I'm typically as suspicious about the mag reviews in general as you are, and I tend to not put a ton of emphasis on them .... a good review is one that says my tools is the best! Sometimes it's probably just a matter of the thoroughness, or lack thereof, the abilities of the reviewer, and maybe the personal opinions of the reviewer....there could be some agendas, but I'm sure not privvy to them. In this case I was using the articles to support my logic on the basic construction differences between the two types of saws. The PW article wasn't a review...just part of a series of articles about the TS in general. FWIW, Workbench rated the 2400 over the other jobsite saws though....obviously that's a good review!

                          [ 08-19-2005, 03:31 PM: Message edited by: Knot Me ]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Knot Me,
                            I guess my issue with the magazines is that they sometimes take the lazy way out. I don't want to suggest anything dishonest, but when reviewers leave out some important details that would favor the saw they didn't put as the "top choice," it makes me wonder whether they are just trying to simplify their review.

                            By leaving out important details, like a thicker table top and sloppy miter slots on a bench-top table saw, it's a lot easier to just say the Bosch is better. Put those two factors back into the equation, and suddenly it's a little more complicated, thereby making the review more difficult, requiring more work and research, and a little more effort to explain the details. But that's what I expect from someone writing a review in a major woodworking magazine!

                            [ 08-23-2005, 11:57 AM: Message edited by: MSchenker ]

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