Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Woodworker wannabe

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Woodworker wannabe

    I know next to nothing about woodworking but am interested in learning how to use the few tools I have. I guess I should have paid more attention to my four fingered shop teacher back in the 8th grade.
    Anyone know of any links that start you off with small projects (bird house, jewelery box, etc..) and work up from there. Each project teaching you more about your tools/ techniques?
    INSIGHT PIPE is now Maine Drain Serving most of ME with no charge for travel! 207-431-6232 is nolonger a working # our NEW # is 207-355-1476
    Sewer main snaking (roto rooting). Sink clogs. Sewer backup. Pipe inspection/locating. No Dig trenchless repair. Root clog removal.We are NOT to replace your local Plumber, as we do not do plumbing. WE ARE YOUR DRAIN CLEANING EXPERTS!!! www.sewermaine.com waterville winslow bangor augusta skowhegan fairfield pittsfield oakland

  • #2
    Re: Woodworker wannabe

    magazines are a great source for projects of varying difficulty. You may also want to check your local library for "easy woodworking projects".

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Woodworker wannabe

      Wow...

      A year ago I was in the same boat as you. The best advice I can give you is to read everything you can get your hands on. The library is your best friend here. Then find some plans (or make your own) and start tinkering. Do an internet search for "cutting boards" or "bird house" and see what you find.

      Also http://www.woodnet.com is a great site, and you can download really good podcasts that are perfect for beginners at http://www.woodworkingonline.com.

      Good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Woodworker wannabe

        I've learned a lot from videos. I also took a class at the Woodcraft store nearby. If you have one near you, look at www.woodcraft.com for your store, and look through the classes they offer.

        A few instructional links.....
        http://www.wood-worker.com/tips.htm
        http://www.woodnet.net/tips/index/
        http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworki...feat_video.asp <<< this site has some real good videos.

        It really is a good idea to get some books. As you start to build your skills, you'll find things come easier. It's difficult at first. The joints don't want to line up, the boards are uneven, things just wanna be difficult. Don't let it frustrate you. Pay attention to the safety aspects and make that the primary goal! You don't want to be the one down a finger!

        Good luck!!
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Woodworker wannabe

          Gene once you get going John Lucas has a very well regarded site with ton's of info on tool use, jigs, various projects etc.

          Check it out at http://www.woodshopdemos.com/

          Be sure to scroll down to the bottom and check out page two etc....

          http://www.woodshopdemos.com/menu2.htm
          Last edited by jbergstrom; 05-22-2007, 12:42 AM. Reason: additional info
          Cheers! - Jim
          -------------
          All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Woodworker wannabe

            There is quite a bit of info for woodworkers of all levels (maybe) here:

            http://www.newwoodworker.com/

            Just remember that sometimes the reviews aren't always what they are cracked up to be. It'd be hard to write a bad review on a tool you got for free! Although I'd love to give it a shot. Hear that, toolmakers?. Send me free stuff!!!
            Jack

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Woodworker wannabe

              I'm a novice myself when it comes to true woodworking. In addition to forums like this and the sites mentioned above, suggest that you watch the New Yankee Workshop and Wood Works. Their projects are more advanced than a bird house, however, it gives you a good idea of where you can progess to.

              DWC

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Woodworker wannabe

                This mag is out of print I think but each back issue has about 10 or 12 projects in it of varying degree of difficulty. There is something for the beginner to the mid-level woodworker in there. More advanced projects; i.e. fine furniture, etc are not in the scope of this magazine, it was aimed at people just like you. There are many back issues that are still available, and your library may have them also, so check there first. My MIL was into scroll-sawing big time for a while and she made many of the kids toys and such she found in there. Check it out.

                http://www.weekendwoodcrafts.com/
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Woodworker wannabe

                  If you live near a college or university check for classes for adults. My wife works at the college here and they offer evening classes for all experience levels.
                  If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Woodworker wannabe

                    Originally posted by amcnerl View Post
                    If you live near a college or university check for classes for adults. My wife works at the college here and they offer evening classes for all experience levels.
                    Woodcraft stores have regular classes on a variety of topics although, I consider them rather pricey at $55 for a one or two night course. If you kknow anyone with a Shopsmith they come with a workbook that starts with the operator making simple cut-offs and rips and progresses through some simple projects. I can't amplify on that - too many years ago. I have seen these books for sale on E-bay. In the meantime, as Norther Wood said, "...read everything you can get your hands on".

                    Later,
                    Chiz
                    Later,
                    Chiz
                    https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Woodworker wannabe

                      Check out the New Yankee Workshop. Find a simple project that interest you here http://www.newyankee.com/byname2.shtml , buy the drawings and video and Norm will walk you through it. He also did shows on table saw and router, etc. operation, which, as a beginner will give you the basics.

                      I haven't used a lathe since high school 40 years ago. Bought a mini lathe and Norm's video on lathe basics and wood turning that gave me a jump start.
                      Last edited by zeker; 05-25-2007, 01:30 PM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X