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  • Table saw blade choice

    I have the TS3650, almost finished assembling. I'm looking for a higher quality blade than what came with the saw and am looking for your suggestions. I want a blade than will produce very high quality cuts in hardwoods for cutting boards and furniture. For the cutting boards, I need to do both crosscuts and rip cuts. Ripcuts have to be very smooth to get good joints between the strips and to cut grooves for spines. The blade must also do a nice crosscut at the edge to finish the uneven ends.

    How is the Ridgid 90 tooth blade? Its available from Amazon for $50. Amazon also has most Freud blades at 20% off. I don't want to spend mega bucks, but want a pretty decent blade for fine cuts and a blade with minimal, ideally no detectable, flex.

    I don't have a joiner BTW.

    Cheers Dennis

  • #2
    Re: Table saw blade choice

    Hi Dennis - AFAIK, the Ridgid Titanium series is made by Freud to similar standards as their Diablo and TK/Avanti lines. Freud Industrial series is their next step up, and are often on sale for just a few dollars more than a comparable Diablo blade. Go with the highest quality you can afford.

    A good 90T blade would undoubtedly leave a smooth cut, but would be prone to burning on rips, and would likely bog down while ripping thick material. It'd be a great choice for crosscuts only, but won't rip very efficiently. You'd be better off with two blades if you want to use a 90T crosscut blade...the second being a dedicated 24T ripping blade. The ripper isn't likely to leave glueline edges so will benefit from some cleanup after. Also, without a jointer, it's going to be critical to choose flat stock to get good joints.

    If you're looking for one blade to do a good job of both type cuts in a wide range of materials, you'll have to make some compromise in either cut quality or efficiency. That said, I get glueup quality cuts from most of my 40-50T general purpose/combo blades like the Forrest WWII (~$80), Ridge Carbide TS2000 (~ $80), Infinity Combomax (~$65), and Tenryu RS25550 (~ $50). Since you mentioned Freud and Amazon, I'll suggest a Freud LU88R010...one of my favorites...it's a 60T blade that's marketed as a crosscut blade, but it has a steep 15 degree hook angle that allows to do a very respectable job ripping to ~ 1.5" thick material, and ends up performing remarkably well in general purpose applications. It's 60T count give it a slightly cleaner cut than my 40T and 50T blades....it's on sale for~ $36 shipped after 20% promo.

    http://www99.epinions.com/LU88

    http://www99.epinions.com/Forrest WWII



    http://www.amazon.com/Freud-LU88R010-Industrial

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Table saw blade choice

      I have the ridgid 90 tooth blade and what heywood says is very true. Its smooth as silk for crosscuts, but for ripping, it is very easy to burn,(better have your fence aligned).

      heywood made some excellent suggestions about other blades to try.

      If you are going to put one blade on and intend to leave it on for all around use, stay away from the 90 tooth.

      Regards

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Table saw blade choice

        Anyone have any experience with Ridge Carbide's TS2000 blade?

        I'm very interested in a quality multi-purpose blade and this seems to fit the bill. However, it's is very similiar in price to a WWII and also to Freud's new Fusion blade (approx $100 range).

        http://www.woodpeck.com/ts2000blade.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Table saw blade choice

          I have an LU88 60T Freud as my "Good" blade for most stuff... I ordered a 50T combo for doing some heavier ripping and such... all i can say about the LU88 is that in pine, on a rip, it leaves an edge that the Jointer would envy... Hardwoods are good also and i can get a glue line edge if i have everything setup correctly.

          BTW, amazon has the Freud Industrial 24T rippers for under 30 bucks delivered at the moment w/ the May discount

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Table saw blade choice

            Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
            Anyone have any experience with Ridge Carbide's TS2000 blade?

            I'm very interested in a quality multi-purpose blade and this seems to fit the bill. However, it's is very similiar in price to a WWII and also to Freud's new Fusion blade (approx $100 range).

            http://www.woodpeck.com/ts2000blade.html
            I had a TS2000 TK. It's very similar in design and performance to the Forrest...IMO the cuts were pretty comparable, with a possible slight edge going to the RC, but my variability could easily account for those minor differences. Both are made in the US, both make full and TK versions, and both offer a premium sharpening service. The TS2000 has considerably thicker carbide, and is honed to 1200 grit. If all else was equal, I think the Ridge Carbide has a slight advantage, but both are excellent. You can get one from Holbren for ~ $80 shipped if you have a coupon code from one of the websites he hangs out at.

            http://www.holbren.com/Ridge Carbide

            Check out dem toofers!
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Table saw blade choice

              Thanks so much for all the advice. The explainations really help me understand why the blades are configured the way they are (tooth #, hook angle, etc) and why this makes them suited for each purpose. It also gives me a basis to help make decissions. So thank you again.

              What do you think about these two blades:
              LU85R010 ultimate finish 80T crosscut blade.
              LM74R010 is a glue line ripping blade (not coated, I think)

              This is a little more $$s than I wanted to spend, but presumably these are high quality blades and will do exactly what I want them to do - glue ready rips and fine square ends.

              My only concern or question is with the blade kerf = 0.116 & 0.126 for the blades above respectively. Is this too much for the TS3650 motor or will it be too much for thicker stock e.g., 8/4 is about the thickest I'm likely to use in hardwood (things like hard maple, purpleheart, and ash). Presumably the thicker blade will be less likely to flex? Wider kerf also means more sawdust!!

              Cheers Dennis

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Table saw blade choice

                Those are both excellent blades for their dedicated task. Full kerf does take a wider bite and puts a bit more strain on the motor, but they do offer more stiffness. Power requirements are pretty much a non-issue for crosscuts, which are typically much easier on the saw. Deflection should not be an issue from a good quality TK in normal use...at least I haven't experienced it with the 20+ top notch TK's I've tried, though there is a higher "theoretical" chance...far more probably from a cheapy.

                The 3650 should spin a full kerf ripper without much problem but the feedrate will need to be slower and will put you at higher risk of burning. The LM74 is a "glueline ripper", as opposed to a bulk ripper, and is designed for materials up to ~ 1" thick. It will rip thicker materials, but it's much better suited for a larger saw for that task. The "GLRs" in general have fairly low side angles to help burnish or polish the edge, which gives you that clean looking cut. The very nature of a low side relief is more of a tendency for burning, so if you start to bog the LM74 it will burn more easily. If your alignment isn't spot on, it will burn more easily. And if you're using stock that hasn't been squared and flattend with a jointer and planer, it will burn more easily. It's a good blade, but it's not the blade I would choose for your situation for the reasons I stated.

                A good general purpose blade like the Forrest WWII, Ridge Carbide TS2000, and Infinity Super or Combomax (all available in a TK), should give you an edge every bit as clean as the LM74 will, plus they'll do a pretty respectable job crosscutting, which the LM74 will not do well. They're designed for material up to ~ 2" thick, though they're not as efficient with material that thick as a 24T ripper like the LU87 is. Unfortunately there's no free lunch...darned laws of physics!

                Honestly, I'd be more concerned about squaring and flattening your stock than I would be about the resultant edge off the saw from any of the blades we've mentioned. If the board has any wane, warp, twist, or other "imperfections" (nearly all do), the imperfections will telegraph through the cut and will prevent you from getting a perfectly squared perpendicular reference edge from any blade, which ultimately will effect your joint quality. A handplane, router, jointer, planer, or combination of all those may be in your future! (Welcome to our dilemna! )

                I know I've tossed out some "complications", and I truly hope I don't discourage you completely b/c that's sure not the intent. I think if I were in your shoes, I'd get a reasonably priced high quality blade, and give it go and see if you're getting the results you'd hoped for. If not, you'll want to start finding ways to improve your chances. Maybe others who don't have a jointer can offer their techniques.

                Good luck and please keep us posted.
                Last edited by hewood; 05-22-2007, 05:03 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Table saw blade choice

                  Don't worry about Full Kerf blades bogging the motor. You just have to watch your feed rate as you should even if you had a big 5 HP beast motor. Wood needs time to cut, but you also don't want to feed too slow and burn it from rubbing. Practice makes perfect. In addition, I really advise having several different blades depending on just what your needs are. Contact several good manufactures. They know which of their blades work well for a given use.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Table saw blade choice

                    Both of those blades are very good. I have the LU85R and its great. I use one of their LU series 24t ripping blades (can't remember the model) and it complements it greatly. If you are looking to save money I recommend you start with a combination blade instead of dedicated blades. Look at something like the the LU83R/LU84R. (thin kerf and full kerf respectively). I have the LU83R and it crosscuts and rips so well its not worth the hassle of swapping to dedicated blades for a lot of tasks. See how the results are and then decide if you feel you really need a high quality dedicated blade for, better crosscutting or ripping.

                    Full kerf blades should offer more stability but I've found with most high quality think kerf blades deflection is not a problem. Cheaper models like the Avanti line with no heat expansion or anti-vibration slots deflect in my experience. Not to mention they are awfully loud. TK will save a little bit of material too. I don't think the 3650 will have any trouble running a full kerf blade. Portable direct drive saws however will stall or trip their breaker with full kerf blades if the cut isn't really thin.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Table saw blade choice

                      Again, thanks for all the advice. I just bought the Freud 24T ripper and 60T crosscut blades, $64 from Amazon. I might go ahead get the 50T combo blade also. The prices are great.

                      The next question is a blade recomendation for my miter saw. I have the Dewalt DW716. I've squared everything up until it looks perfect. However, with the stock blade (a dewalt 60T construction blade) I get signicant burn on the offcut side. Although let me explain what I was cutting. I live in Arizona and love the native trees, in particular ironwood. I have been cutting 3-4 in diam ironwood branches to make coffee coasters and candle holders. The wood is hard, so I cut slowly. Its not terribly easy to hold the branch still. However, cutting the same wood and mesquite, I did get fantastic cuts that looked sanded smooth both sides using a Delta industrial miter saw with a normal kerf good quality delta blade. So it has to be something with the Dewalt saw or blade. Either I have blade flex with my Dewalt, or I've not got it set up properly. To test set-up, I have cut a pine 2x4 at 45 degree miter and 45 degree bevel and got a good clean cut with no burn. This tells me the saw is set up OK. My woodshop instructor said he likes normal kerf blades on miter saws "a good chuncky blade" is what he said, which may reduce the burn.

                      Any suggestions?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Table saw blade choice

                        I would also recommend a good full kerf blade for a miter saw. Way less deflection, particularly on a 12" saw. Only in the case of a sliding miter saw or Radial arm saw is advisable to go with a blade with a very low or negative hook angle to reduce the possibility of kickback due to the way they move. Tends to tear out less too.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Table saw blade choice

                          Originally posted by DWfromUK View Post
                          Again, thanks for all the advice. I just bought the Freud 24T ripper and 60T crosscut blades, $64 from Amazon. I might go ahead get the 50T combo blade also. The prices are great.

                          The next question is a blade recomendation for my miter saw. I have the Dewalt DW716. I've squared everything up until it looks perfect. However, with the stock blade (a dewalt 60T construction blade) I get signicant burn on the offcut side. Although let me explain what I was cutting. I live in Arizona and love the native trees, in particular ironwood. I have been cutting 3-4 in diam ironwood branches to make coffee coasters and candle holders. The wood is hard, so I cut slowly. Its not terribly easy to hold the branch still. However, cutting the same wood and mesquite, I did get fantastic cuts that looked sanded smooth both sides using a Delta industrial miter saw with a normal kerf good quality delta blade. So it has to be something with the Dewalt saw or blade. Either I have blade flex with my Dewalt, or I've not got it set up properly. To test set-up, I have cut a pine 2x4 at 45 degree miter and 45 degree bevel and got a good clean cut with no burn. This tells me the saw is set up OK. My woodshop instructor said he likes normal kerf blades on miter saws "a good chuncky blade" is what he said, which may reduce the burn.

                          Any suggestions?

                          I'd suggest you make your cut just 1/32" longer than what you really want, then make a final "shave" to get a clean cut.

                          Making a full cut through 3"+ ironwood would tax any saw / blade. But if you are just making a paper thin slice to clean off the burn, you should be able to do it fast enough to avoid a burn on your now-finished cut face.

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