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TS3650 inserts(again)

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  • TS3650 inserts(again)

    Well, I am trying to make some inserts for my 3650 and have some questions. The original insert is about 3/8 of an inch thick. I measured the distance from the flange that the insert sets on to the top of the cast iron and it is about 1/2". the problem is if I cut a piece of 1/2" that fits flush with the table top, the insert hits the blade meaning that the 1/2' insert does not sit flush which means I cannot raise the blade to cut the kerf. Any assistance would be great.

  • #2
    You can rout a "starter groove" in the bottom of the insert to clear the blade or use a 7 1/4" circ saw blade the same width as your TS blade to start the kerf. Hope this helps.
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      If you are using a full kerf blade you could use your 8" dado set to start the kerf. I wold use both outer blades to cut halfway through and then use the blade that the ZCI is designed for to comlpete the cut

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      • #4
        I'm fairly new to this and not sure this would work, but how about using 2 way tape to fix the blank to the "top" of your factory insert to make sure it is lined up correctly. Then use long stock and clamp the whole thing in place, then raise your blade up through the original, into the blank.

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        • #5
          That would kind of defeat the purpose. You want the insert to match the kerf as closely as possible in it FINAL location. If it is off by 1/16" you still might get some chipping on crosscuts of ply since the blade will just widen the slot when you put it in.

          Not to mention the safety issues associated with that, never underestimate the power of a TS. I had crazy images of newly crafted ZCI flying through the air when I read that. Just my 2 cents.

          [ 04-20-2004, 05:15 PM: Message edited by: Barry Johnson ]

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          • #6
            There's a safe and relatively easy way to do this. Line up your rip fence precisely with the edge of the insert. This will be easiest with the insert out. Then put the stock insert back in. Put your new insert on top of the stock insert and hold it in place by clamping blocks to the fence in front and back. The clamp the insert down with a block on top. Then you can run your regular blade up through.

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            • #7
              This is true but I should have been a little clearer. I meant this only as a way of getting the kerf started. The original post said the when his 1/2" ZCI blank was in it's proper place it wouldn't sit flush as the blade interfered and therefore he could not start to cut the kerf. I felt that by fixing his blank to the top of the factory insert he would be able to raise the blade through the factory insert and into the blank enough to get the kerf started. Once this was done, he would be able to take the ZCI blank, install it as it should be, and continue the cut as he would normally have done had he used 3/8" stock. Hmmmmmmmm I'm not sure if I made this clearer or not ha ha I'm sure you guys will let me know.

              As I mentioned earlier I am new to this and already have learned a lot from this forum and I agree that above all else, safety must come first.

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              • #8
                OOPS

                Sorry ByteButcher, I think I'm out of sync with the posts. I agree with you 100%, I was replying to Barry's response.

                [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]

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                • #9
                  If you have a router mounted to a table you can run a partial grove thru the underside of the blank insert. With the saw you can take the factory insert out, put the screw back in and then reinsert the factory insert so it rests on the screw head. Then clamp a piece of 1x6 over the insert and turn the saw on and raise the blades slowly a couple turns. After you have started the grove remove the wood and clamps and install the insert in its normal way. I place the edge of the fence over the edge of the insert making sure its not over where the will come thru and finish the cut.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the great tips. One final question...Should I use 1/2" stock or 3/8"? Seems to me at this point 3/8" would be easier. Thanks again.

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                    • #11
                      I didn't mean to critize Steph. Even if you were only starting the kerf I don't believe the double sided tape would make a strong enough connection to make the cut safely considering the upward and forward motion of the blade. The clamp idea above would work but I'd still be nervous doing that.

                      I have done both the router method, and smaller blade method using one side of my 8" dado to 1/8" kerf and only going halfway for tk blades to make the 3/32" kerf. Those are the only methods I would recommend. Hope that helps.

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                      • #12
                        Hey there Barry.

                        Don't worry about being critical, I didn't take it that way. This is how we learn, and as I mentioned before safety always must be first.

                        Chat later

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Stephanie:
                          I'm fairly new to this and not sure this would work, but how about using 2 way tape to fix the blank to the "top" of your factory insert to make sure it is lined up correctly. Then use long stock and clamp the whole thing in place, then raise your blade up through the original, into the blank.
                          Well guys. I think the lady has a pretty good idea (although not necessarily the best way). After all she did say to line it up correctly and also to clamp it down. I really don't see anything wrong with that. By the way Steph, Welcome! [img]smile.gif[/img]
                          Lorax
                          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                          • #14
                            You won't be happy with 3/8" stock. It will sag under pressure, especially if making a dado plate. All these ideas may work but it seems to me that the easiest thing to do is to buy a cheap 8" thin kerf blade to cut the initial slot then finish with whatever blade you're going to use. Have you seen my post in Tips and Techniques for making throatplates? It may help.

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