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  • TS3650 - Getting Started

    Bought the TS3650 a week or so back. Put it together over a couple of days. Had the usual moment of panic over what to do with the three extra bolts.

    The thing I found tricky was getting the blade guard assembly both aligned and secure. Is it just me, or is the way it attaches less than ideal?

    Currently planning an outfeed table which leads to my question:

    If I want to cut up a sheet of plywood, is it best to rip first then crosscut, or vice versa, or does it not matter?

    Any thoughts would be much appreciated!

    Simon

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

    Simon: The saw doesn't care. It depends on what size piece you are cutting. For example, if you want a piece 10" wide by 7'-6" long--rip first. If you want a piece 4' x 47" wide, crosscut first. Whatever gives you the best use of material is your rule of thumb.
    Jim

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

      The thing I found tricky was getting the blade guard assembly both aligned and secure. Is it just me, or is the way it attaches less than ideal?

      Simon[/quote]


      Simon,

      Since this problem (above) wasn't addressed in the only response you have gotten so far, I will throw in my two cents.

      When I installed my blade guard I found that it did not sit (perfectly) perpendicular to the table. Since it is just made from stamped sheet metal, I screwed it tightly to the saw and then just "tweaked" it a bit until all looked well, then made the adjustments. Since I don't keep my blade guard on when not using the saw, I just went out and installed it again - checked for allignment - removed and installed it again, and all was still perfectly alligned.

      Since this saw is so heavy, I had my brother come help me put it together one week ago. Kind of strange to see someone had some problems, since one of the few things I pointed out to him was the unique design of the blade guard attachment. Just push it on the spindle, line up the little pin in the vee, and tighten the thumb screw, and it was perfectly alligned to the saw blade and very solid. Not to repeat myself but I tried it on and off twice while composing this post, and it lined up perfectly both times. Maybe you are having trouble with something different, or maybe you have a defective part.

      Anyway, I hope you like your new saw - I just love mine, and am glad I did some research "on line" and found this forum (about six months ago), or I am sure that I would have purchased a different brand, having not heard of "Ridgid" before this forum. Good price though and am glad I waited this long before buying. The saw was on sale for $499, and I asked for - and got - a $50 discount. Total price out the door was $484 and pennies. I'm a veteran and it was six days before Memorial Day, so the discount was easy. Good luck and hope this might have helped a little.

      Mick

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

        I had a heck of a time getting the splitter aligned initially. Now that it's set though, I can take it off and put it back on and it stays locked in very well. I really like that splitter, and tend to use it whenever I can.

        One thing I did was to put the splitter in the vice and bend the top just a tiny bit to get it vertically aligned. As it was on the mount, it was a bit off at the top. It was only a problem when cutting something thick, which I don't do often! Aligning it horizontally was a challenge. I had to use my big level as a straight edge. It's the only thing I own of that length that I can really trust to have a straight edge. Once done, it's done for good and I really like that it is easy to remove and replace.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

          Getting the splitter aligned is one of the more challenging aspects to the saw. Realize that there are three different points of adjustment for it. The manual only covers two. The three pieces are the Blade Guard or Splitter (which attaches with two 10mm bolts/nuts) to the Spreader Support (which has the thumbscrew in it and slides onto the shaft of the) Blade Guard Support, which attaches to the cradle with two 12mm bolts. The manual covers aligning the blade guard vertical to the table by using a try-square against the splitter and loosening/tightening the two 12 mm bolts in the Blade Guard Support (Step 1 in getting it aligned). It also covers loosing/tightening the two 10 mm bolts holding the Blade Guard to the spreader support to get it parallel to the blade. What it does NOT cover is that to get the vertical/parallel splitter lined up directly behind the blade, it is often necessary to loosen the 4mm (5/32) hex screw (allen wrench type) on the round shaft to allow you to move the whole thing left or right. (Step 3). This is done with the thumb screw tight on the rod.
          So, if you first get it vertical to the table, and then get it parallel to the blade, loosening the allen screw will let you get it behind the blade. With a thin kerf blade, you may have to go back and forth between steps two and three, but it isn't that difficult once you realize that allen screw is there.

          BTDT

          Go
          Practicing at practical wood working

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

            I also thought the blade guard wasn't too solid and not too easy to align accuratly. Its a large (long) peice of metal attached with small screws at points distant to where it matters most - where the splitter comes close to the blade. There is quite alot of flop at the blade end. That said, as others have noted, you can remove it and replace it and it seems to keep its alignment.

            Not to change the subject (although I am : ), I am having a hell of a time trying to get the 1/8 clearance between the blade and left side (viewed from the front) of the throat plate. Its about 1/16 right now. To get the blade aligned with the miter slot, the adjustment lever on the rear trunion is moved all the way to the left, and the blade is still 3 thou out (tested with a dial guage thats running in the miter slot). I've loosened all the trunnig bolts and tried to move the assembly over, but it comes right back to 1/16 inch when I tighten the bolts. I'm wondering if anyone has used the PALS system sold by In line industries to solve this successfully?? BTW, I was amazed to see that the fence is aligned to the miter slot almost perfectly - within 1-2 thou variance along its full length which is amazing really.

            I believe that the throat plate clearance is only an issue if there is any contact with the blade and anything else when the saw is used for bevel cuts. But it makes me nervous that I have such a small clearance, especially when I use a full kerf blade (which will arrive shortly). I may have little more than 1/32 clearance with the teeth and the throat plate!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

              DW -

              I also have VERY narrow throat plate clearance. I think I'm just going to make some zero-clearance inserts anyway, but you are not alone in the tight fit on that.

              Mike

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

                I had the same situation when I first bought my saw 1 1/2 years ago and used it with no problems (mine would tilt all the way to 45 degree bevel without the blade hitting the insert). Last week I decided to do a "tune-up". Blade had wandered out a bit from square with the miter slot (having had much abuse from getting green lumber jambed in the blade and my rookie mistakes the first few months of owning it,). I could not get it to come in until I removed the belt from the motor and also backed the bevel wheel off a little bit from the 90 degree stop. Without this additional side stress, I was able to loosen all the trunnion bolts and move everything over about 1/16th of an inch, as well as getting the blade aligned with the miter slot (used a dial indicator this time) and still have the micro-adjust lever about center.
                Summary: Take the belt off the motor and move the blade a couple degrees off vertical and then realign everything.
                Caveats: Some downsides. After doing this I had to go through all the realignments including the splitter, as well as had to recut my ZCIs as all were too far too the left. If you have any jigs with a saw cut in them, the kerf will not be the same, and if you use the scale on the fence, you will have to readjust the indicators.

                Lesson Learned

                Go
                Practicing at practical wood working

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: TS3650 - Getting Started

                  When I tried to realign the blade to give me the 1/8 inch clearance, I actually removed the motor and the belt, but I didn't move the blade a few degrees off vertical. I'll try this.

                  I set up a dial indicator on a runner that fits in the miter slot so its pretty fast and easy to check for alignment now.

                  Comment

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