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Jointer Planer Depth of Cut

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  • Jointer Planer Depth of Cut

    Hi,

    I just got my jointer set up and had a few basic concerns. When planing or jointing what should be the depth of cut? Many thin passes or fewer deeper cuts. Does one method dull the blades quicker? What would be max depth in hard woods? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

    OT - seems like this forum is slowing down. I'm wondering if it is too cold in the garage?

    Best regards,

    Henry

  • #2
    more thin cuts, especially the last one.
    thinner is smoother

    Comment


    • #3
      Henry, Keep your cuts on the thinner side for hardwoods. Feed it slow and steady. Feed with the grain,same on your planer! If you can, get ahold of Mark Duginske's video "Mastering woodworking machines". He does an EXCELLENT job of explaining the process of jointing and planing. Also, his bandsaw video is pretty good too! I rent them from Woodcraft in Canton,Mi. & make myself a copy!

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      • #4
        George,

        I will rent the video - heck, I've already seen everything I want at Blockbuster!

        Best regards,

        Henry

        Comment


        • #5
          George K.,

          Oops. You might want to keep the video copying to yourself. That could open a huge can of worms. [img]smile.gif[/img]

          Michael

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          • #6
            Yeah George, you might find Mark Duginske at your door with a chainsaw

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            • #7
              Only if I sell it! By the way I pretty much have that video memorized,and so does my wife and my kids, ain't life grand?

              Comment


              • #8
                George, that's not true.

                If you had bought it, then you would have the right to make a copy for your own use (to reduce wear on the original, for example).

                If it were broadcast (and Mark Duginske were paid broadcast rates rather than a royalty of cents per tape) you have the right to record it so you can watch it at a more convenient time.

                But when Woodcraft (or Blockbuster) buys it and rents it to you, you do not have the right to make a copy . So watch out for the guy at the door with a chain saw . (I gotta try the chainsaw bit to enforce my copyright material )

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