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TS3650 arbor problem

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  • TS3650 arbor problem

    I am new newly registered, but have gotten a lot of good info from this forum, you guys are great.
    I have a problem with my arbor - it is deformed enough that a blade will not fit on it easily, which is ok, because the nut won't thread on anyway. I have seen on another thread that retapping the arbor would be something to try short of taking the saw back in, but could that lead to other problems if I do that - like removing material will result in thinner threads or cause the arbor to not be square. One other factor is that I have the arbor with the old design where I don't have threads all the way to the inside of the arbor.

    Thanks for any opinions.

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 arbor problem

    Originally posted by dustbreather View Post
    I am new newly registered, but have gotten a lot of good info from this forum, you guys are great.
    I have a problem with my arbor - it is deformed enough that a blade will not fit on it easily, which is ok, because the nut won't thread on anyway. I have seen on another thread that retapping the arbor would be something to try short of taking the saw back in, but could that lead to other problems if I do that - like removing material will result in thinner threads or cause the arbor to not be square. One other factor is that I have the arbor with the old design where I don't have threads all the way to the inside of the arbor.

    Thanks for any opinions.
    If it is deformed that much, rethreading it won't really help. You'll just basically make the arbor smaller in order to make it round again. If the saw is under warranty, I'd contact Ridgid about a replacement arbor.

    -Steve

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    • #3
      Re: TS3650 arbor problem

      Dustbreather, If you still have the old style arbor, your saw maybe out of warranty. If it is and you want to change the arbor, (quite a chore, I understand) I have a brand new one in the drawer that you can have. If you want it, send me a PM and we will figure out how to get it to you.
      Jim

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      • #4
        Re: TS3650 arbor problem

        I agree with the others above. I would just call Ridgid anyways and tell them you had the faulty arbor and would like a replacement. If they refuse then I guess you can probably take up Jim's very generous offer for a replacement. I for one would rather go through the pain of replacing the arbor rather than trying to fix it.
        Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

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        • #5
          Re: TS3650 arbor problem

          Something popped into my mind about this last night (it happens once or twice a year that a light bulb comes on...). I think at some point in the past Ridgid was replacing those old arbors for free because they were creating a problem with some dado cutters. The cutter would fall into the reduced diameter shoulder and create an uneven (and maybe dangerous) cut since it would be basically unbalanced and out-of-round.

          Anyway, maybe you could call Ridgid to see if they'll still honor the old replacement program. It's worth a shot.

          Anybody else remember this? Or am I dreaming?

          -Steve

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          • #6
            Re: TS3650 arbor problem

            Steve, what you are saying is (or was) correct. I believe that dustbreather was kind of leading up to the probability that he had that defective arbor in his saw when referring to the threads not leading all the way up. I hadn't really thought about that much either. But I do recall another poster some time ago working with Ridgid to get his replaced and was told that they are no longer shipping the replacement arbors out and one must bring the saw in to a authorized repair facility to have the work done. I believe it was still covered under warranty however. In this case the saw may or may not fall into that warranty catagory and dustbreather will probably need to contact Ridgid to see what can be done. Either way it was 1 or 2 posters from around 3 or 4 months ago, as I can seem to recall, that reported they were not able to get the arbors from Ridgid and had to take the tool to a repair shop instead.
            Still enjoying all 10 fingers!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TS3650 arbor problem

              Pipestone Kid - Thanks very much for the offer, I appreciate it very much, amazing how you guys help each other out. It does seem like a big job to change it out.... I took the advice of contacting Ridgid with the problem, and they said to take the saw in for repair. Since there is a repair center close, I am loading it up and taking it in. I did a little more looking and it looks to me like it is the bad arbor from a couple of years back, there is about an 1/8" or so shoulder on the shaft between the fixed stabilizer and where the threads start.
              Thanks very much for the replies.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TS3650 arbor problem

                Sorry for chiming in late here (been busy) but I would like to clear up a misconception that I see in the posts:

                1. The threads Do Not run all the way to the arbor shoulder on either arbor (good or "bad"). There is a smooth shank next to the shoulder approx 1/8" wide so that the blade will center when installed. The shoulder washer ensures that the nut will not bottom out regardless of the blade thickness.
                The difference is where the threads meet the smooth shank area. On the "Bad" arbor, the threads stopped about 1/8" away from the smooth shank, and had a groove all the way to thread depth next to the smooth area. This allowed the second cutter in a dado stack to slip down into the groove. On the good arbor, the threads run almost to touching the smooth area (but there is still a small groove, although it is less than 1/16). Neither arbor presented a problem with only a full or thin kerf blade installed.

                2. Many off the less expensive blades are sprayed with a clear coating that can build up in the center hole. They may be difficult to slide on the first couple of times until the coating buildup is worn down. Better quality blades have a very close tolerance on the center hole to minimize any runout on the blade. So snug is not a bad thing. The blades on my dado set are very close tolerance and require a bit of patience to slide on down to the shoulder. This saw is closer tolerance than a lot of the cheaper table top models you may be familiar with, so the tolerances are closer, and the fits more exact in the areas where this makes a difference.

                3. As for the arbor nut not threading on, I would check to make sure there are no burrs in the threads. My saw came with the blade installed and the nut overtightened in my estimation. Because of the machined threads, the nut was very difficult to get aligned to start it, but has gotten easier (or I have gotten more experienced at starting it) after use.

                Hopefully the repair shop will identify your problem.

                Go
                Practicing at practical wood working

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