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  • After market TS blade guard for the 3650

    I'm considering buying one of those cantilever style blade guards that come down from the top. Like the Brett-guard one here: http://www.htcproductsinc.com/bgsg.html

    Has anyone had any experience with these? How did you attach it?

  • #2
    Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

    In order to use the whole capacity of the rails you will need to attach an auxillary table much like the router extension table. That will give the rails a bit more support. You will also need an apron on this extension against the cast iron table in order to help distribute the cantileered weight of the arm and another apron on the far right large enuogh to attach the arm. In addition you would probably want legs since it looks pretty beeefy. Be sure to buy the one with dust collection capability. After collecting from the bottom shroud it's the only other dust source on the saw. Have you looked into the Shark guard? I understand they have one out for the 3650 now.
    Last edited by ironhat; 07-24-2007, 04:22 PM. Reason: additional material
    Later,
    Chiz

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

      I've seen the Shark guard, but what I'm looking for is a guard that I can still use during dado at rabbet cuts. Looks like not many other folks on this forum have installed one of these top down style guards. If I buy it, I'll post some pics of how I attached it.

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      • #4
        Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

        I would be interested in how the thing works. I have worked forever without a blade guard on my table saw because everyone I've tried just gets in the way. (yes, I still have all my fingers)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

          I know what you mean, Jim. I'm assuming that you and I were shop-raised in the days before guards, shrouds, splitters and riving knives. I'm not saying that it was better - just different. It troubles me when I can't see the the board as it disappears under the guard and I also can't fully see the board's contact with the fence. I had thought about using the rollers that hold the board to the fence and prevent kickback by preventing rearward movement. There'a an old method of ripping a narrow board. YOu feed half of it through, pull it back, flip it end-for-end and cut the other half so that your fingers don't have to pass the blade. Oh well, not griping, I'm actually adapting and getting used to using featherboards for ripping so I'm gradually getting onboard. BTW, Jim, welcome to the board.
          Later,
          Chiz

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

            "(yes, I still have all my fingers)"

            Unfortunately I have three friends who don't. Each lost a segment of a finger to a table saw.
            ---------------
            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
            ---------------
            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
            ---------
            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
            ---------
            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

              Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
              "(yes, I still have all my fingers)"

              Unfortunately I have three friends who don't. Each lost a segment of a finger to a table saw.

              My daughter works in the x-ray dept and says that they see a power tool amputation about once a month. A common but mostly avoidable type of accident and often it's the 'dumb' mistake that get you; like moving that little cut-off ou of the way with your fingers instead of a stick or, better yet, turning off the saw. I've often wondered how much it would add to the cost of a saw to add a brake. The slow wind-down time is probably the biggest deterrent to folks turning the machine off - too impatient to wait. OK, off my soapbox for a while.
              Later,
              Chiz
              Later,
              Chiz

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

                I agree with you on the brake, it would be a great safety feature and certainly cheaper to implement than the Saw$top. I think the Euro saws have a brake, their stationary power tools (and portable for that matter) seem to be light-years ahead of us in the safety dept. I know that safety features sometimes (some of you will say most times) make use of the tool more difficult or take away a manner in which you use the tool to accomplish a particular task, and you are right. I find myself liking and disliking some safety features but I don't disable them, somehow I have always found another way to do whatever I wanted to do, either using another tool or modifying the way I use that tool.

                One finger a month (and that's just one hospital right?) is a greater frequency than I would have imagined.

                Speaking of coast down times my BS takes a long time to come to a stop, almost 30 seconds. I wish it had a foot brake. Next time I am at a tool show I think I will inspect some of the other makes and see how they implemented their foot brakes to get some ideas on building one for mine.
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: After market TS blade guard for the 3650

                  Originally posted by ironhat View Post
                  I know what you mean, Jim. I'm assuming that you and I were shop-raised in the days before guards, shrouds, splitters and riving knives. I'm not saying that it was better - just different. It troubles me when I can't see the the board as it disappears under the guard and I also can't fully see the board's contact with the fence. I had thought about using the rollers that hold the board to the fence and prevent kickback by preventing rearward movement. There'a an old method of ripping a narrow board. YOu feed half of it through, pull it back, flip it end-for-end and cut the other half so that your fingers don't have to pass the blade. Oh well, not griping, I'm actually adapting and getting used to using featherboards for ripping so I'm gradually getting onboard. BTW, Jim, welcome to the board.
                  You are very perceptive Ironhat. I followed my dad around from an early age and completed my first project at about 10. I enjoy this forum and regret not getting into in earlier but the plumbing thing kept me out of it. I feel a little strange being labeled Junior at anything considering I'll soon be 71 years old. These other guys posting are all correct about the dangers of a table saw and woodworking in general but I have always been consious of where my hands and fingers are. My dad lost three of the fingers on his left hand in three seperate incidents not with a table saw but with a circular saw. I witnessed a couple of those and it was not pleasent. That is always with me.

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