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Using a shaper

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  • Using a shaper

    Can someone point to a good resource to learn about shapers, or perhaps give me a brief explanation on using a shaper. The reason I'm asking, is that we will be building a house very soon. I am thinking about making the interior doors and the front door. If I understand the basics of the shaper, its like a more robust and sturdy version of table mounted router?? If I were going to tackle making the doors (normal widths with hights up to 8 ft made from alder or a softwood, normal style and rail with raised panel construction), would I be better of with a good quality router and router table or a comparably priced shaper?

    Thanks Dennis

  • #2
    Re: Using a shaper

    A cheap shaper is going to be about 3 times the cost of a top quality router and the cutters for it are also expensive compared to 1/2" router bits although most shapers will accept an adapter to allow them to use router bits. Have you seen this Freud router set designed for the doors you are making?

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    • #3
      Re: Using a shaper

      Thanks for the link. I have seen these kinds of bits, but never used them. To make 20 or so doors, would I need a hefty 3 1/4 router, something like the Porter-Cable 7518 and a hefty table to go with it??

      If i don't end up doing all the doors, I will at least do the front door. In which case I might not need the bits as I'd probably use spline joints. They should work, right? Glue some for stability and not others for movement??

      Thanks Dennis

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      • #4
        Re: Using a shaper

        20 doors is a lot! Will you be hanging them as you finish each one? If not, youneed to consider how they will be stored until hanging. Doors have a tendency to warp in storage. Laying them flat with some weight on top has served me well on large jobs while waiting for other trades to get their stuff done. Leaning against a wall is a recipie for wicked warpage. This is all from an installers view point. I plan on (eventually) getting more into the production and manufacturing side of things.
        Here is a link that you may find helpfull:
        http://www.woodweb.com/KnowledgeBase...rsWindows.html
        Good luck,

        Jack
        ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

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        • #5
          Re: Using a shaper

          A good hefty router, pretty much any good name with 3+ HP. All the table has to be is sturdy and a decent size since you are dealing with large and heavy frame members. for this job a home made table may be best, nothing fancy, 18" X 48" melamine with a plywood base would be perfect. The fence could also be plywood glued together to form an 'L' and clamped in place to the melamine.

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          • #6
            Re: Using a shaper

            http://grizzly.com/ has some good shapers for a reasonable price for the machine,

            I have the G 1035 and wished I would have gone with the the g 1026 the three horse, unit, more for table size. but there a good shaper,
            but a heavy router in a table would work as well,
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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            • #7
              Re: Using a shaper

              Very good point about storage, and yes 20 doors is a lot! I am on sabbatical this year so will have more time than weekends and evenings, and feel a little more confident about the doability of this. I think once you get the first door made, the rest is really a "mass" production process. Storage will be somewhat of an issue, as will staining. I'd need to go with a sprayer for this many doors. If I go rustic, I'll need to either sandblast them or wirebrush them with an angle grinder which will be a big job. I wonder if a local woodshop might have a planer type machine with a wirebrush insert they could run them through??

              Cheers Dennis

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              • #8
                Re: Using a shaper

                Dennis,
                I don't know what sort of tools you have for hanging these types of doors, but a few really good ones will make life much easier. I use a Porter Cable Porta-Plane
                http://www.amazon.com/Porter-Cable-9.../dp/B00004U0SZ but have heard that they are going out of production for a while (and I couldn't locate one on the Delta/PC web site) so get while the gettin's good.
                For hinge templates I use
                http://www.templaco.com/html/categor...ory=Von+Morris
                For the hardware bore, I use
                http://www.templaco.com/html/product...re_Master_Kits
                If you get one of these, be sure to go with the carbide (you'd be amazed how fast you waste the standard steel bits!)
                This is a bit of an expensive list of specialty tools, but the right tools can save you from a lot of headaches (and ruined doors).
                For this many doors, I also recommend that you build a door bench. Nothing fancy, just some 2X4's and 1X4's. If you can't find a picture of one, let me know and I'll draw you a simple picture.
                Have fun!
                Jack
                ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

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