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  • Looking for a specific tool

    I have been seeing a decorative joint lately that looks almost like an hourglass. It is two triangle shapes that are point to point. Most often I see it cut into adjoining pieces and then filled with a darker or contrasting piece of wood cut to fit the shape. Typically it is in mission style furniture.

    I would like to know how it is made and with what tool. And how the filler piece is made.

    I hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Tom,

    Welcome to the forum!

    I'm not sure which joint you are referring to from your description. There are a number of joints used in mission style furniture that would not be exclusive to that style.

    I don't know how familiar you are with basic joints, so was wondering if it may be a dovetail joint. If so, the darker or contrasting portion is not a contrasting piece of wood, it comes about because end grain absorbs more stain so it makes it appear darker.

    Here's a link to Leigh Jigs' site and you can click on some of the joints to see samples. Hope this helps.

    Bob R

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    • #3
      Thanks Bob. I'm a enthusiast woodworker having built all the cabinetry (kitchen and bathrooms)in my 100 year old prarie style house (The house is 100 years old the cabinets are about two). I am familiar with the dovetail and this joint looks like a combination of two dovetails. Think of a face frame for a cabinet front where a vertical member would meet with a horizontal member. At the line where they meet cut out a through dovetail in each one and then fill the void with a darker piece of wood that is like two v shapes with their points touching.

      I was also thinking if there were a mortising bit set that was a triangle shape instead of a square it could be used.

      Any ideas?

      maybe the answer is to create two through dovetails and then make the "key" to hold them together. I am thinking there has to be an easier way. I wish

      Comment


      • #4
        If I am understanding what you are asking, David Marks demonstrated this technique on his show when he did the episode on fixing common mistakes, wood imperfections, etc. He used it to save a piece of burl that had a crack in it. He used a piece of I believe purpleheart to cut the "bowtie" that was inlaid to prevent the board from splitting further. Looked AWESOME!
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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        • #5
          Tom

          I think Space may be correct and it is an inlay because a joint of that type would offer no structural integrity with the narrowest piece bearing the load of the joint. They also sell kits to accomplish inlays, I’ve never tried one so this is not an endorsement.

          http://mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_.../routnlay.html

          Woodslayer

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          • #6
            Tom

            Ignore that last post, I read over face frame and was thinking cabinet. I just did some research and in Classic Joints with Power Tools by Yeung Chan he describes how to make them, you just need a router table with dovetail bit and a table saw. They are referred to as dovetail key or butterfly key joints.

            Woodslayer

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            • #7
              But dovetail keyed joints are not a feature of Mission style furniture. The butterfly inlay sounds more plausible to me.

              Comment


              • #8
                Space,

                I too really liked the look of David Marks "bowtie" repair. Here the link to check it out:

                # Woodworking Repairs and Fixes, Pt. 1: Natural Flaws
                -Daryle

                ===================================

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                • #9
                  Tom,

                  I have a project for which I've considered using butterfly joints.... about 300 of them !

                  I have put some thought into making a jig for butterfly joints using a "Stotts dovetail template". I considered a few methods in which a jig could be constructed to consistently and (somewhat) quickly create identical butterfly inlay peices.

                  I think that if you are still looking for a specific tool, constructing a router jig is the way to go.

                  I have not yet built the jig. I'll build the jig if I have to, but at the moment I am actually hoping that I may find a place that sells butterfly plugs in bulk.

                  - derek

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                  • #10
                    Foulkeyworks

                    Yeah that was an awesome episode. Wife keeps deleting it from the Tivo!

                    I love david marks. No disrespect to norm abram, he is a VERY talented man, but David makes Norm look like a hack! I love them both!

                    I would LOVE to see david marks do a project all hand tools. ALL hand tools. No power whatsoever.
                    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TomHum:
                      I have been seeing a decorative joint lately that looks almost like an hourglass. It is two triangle shapes that are point to point. Most often I see it cut into adjoining pieces and then filled with a darker or contrasting piece of wood cut to fit the shape. Typically it is in mission style furniture.

                      I would like to know how it is made and with what tool. And how the filler piece is made.

                      I hope this makes sense. Thanks in advance.
                      Is this what you are looking for?

                      http://www.woodpeck.com/butterflytemplate.html
                      Lorax
                      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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