Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Guide for Circular Saw

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Guide for Circular Saw

    What do you use as a guide for cutting sheet goods using your circular saw?

  • #2
    Re: Guide for Circular Saw

    Usually just follow pencil mark to get close to the needed size then use RAS to finish size. If the sheets are to remain near full size I will just use the factory edge of a cutoff and clamp it to the sheet to be cut. I have an 8.5' aluminum straight edge as well but seem to use the cut offs more often

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Guide for Circular Saw

      I'll do the same. Use a factory cut edge as guide or some guides cut on the table saw.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Guide for Circular Saw

        I use an All-in-One clamp.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Guide for Circular Saw

          I use the factory edge on a left over strip of ply.

          I do like that guide that BD posted. I think I'll have to look into that, sure beats the expense of building a panel saw jig.

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Guide for Circular Saw

            Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
            I use an All-in-One clamp.
            Neat. I'll have to look into getting one of those.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Guide for Circular Saw

              I use this shop made cut-off board

              Click image for larger version

Name:	a5ab287a3a5ece9f8180f1399324fbc7.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	49.6 KB
ID:	1620

              Made from shop scraps. It's 56" long. I made it for the skilsaw on one side and my router with 1/2 straight bit on the other.
              For long pieces, I use either my 80" or 96" stabilla levels.
              The reason I like this is it's cheap and the tool rides on the guide, not the surface of what you're cutting. Great for cutting bottoms off of finished doors (no scuff marks).
              ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                Res057, do you get much chip-out with that design? I ask only because it seems the blade is lifted off the material about 1/8". Other than that, it's a very cool idea. Definitely something I can see making for my old Skill Saw.

                The one that BadgerDave linked is very cool. Seems like there's a few different models of those floating about. Woodcraft sells that one as well. I've been considering that system mostly because it also comes with a router plate.
                I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                  Sandy,
                  With a sharp blade I get no chip out. The guide acts like half of a zero clearance. If you do experience that, you could always make a sacrificial backer board.
                  Jack
                  ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                    Thanks, Jack! Yet another great idea from the Ridgid boards!!
                    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                      I also use a straightedge clamp. I have a 50" long model that's great for cross-cutting sheet goods.

                      I've toyed with buying the extendable model that goes all the way out to 102". But, normally, I just kind of rough cut a long rip, then finish size / cut on the table saw.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                        Here's the niftiest jig since the invention of the fish hook.

                        I’ve found that handling large sheets on the table saw alone is both dangerous and difficult. As a result I concocted this jig that I adapted from a woodworking magazine (I can’t remember which one). I cut a 15” by 8’ section off a 4 x 8 sheet of ¼ plywood. I then cut 2’ off one end leaving me a 15” x 6’ piece. I placed it on the table saw so that I could raise the blade under it about 6 inches from one end and 7-1/2” from one edge. I then cut a slot in the piece stopping about 6” from the other end. I cut three evenly spaced 1” diameter holes with a spade bit along the slot to use for alignment. Next I put the circular saw in the slot and at each side of the foot plate placed a ¼” section of stainless steel channel that was 6’ long along each side of the saw’s foot, being careful to get it fairly snug against the foot. These rails came from Home Depot’s shelf section. I think they are used for support on the back side of shelves. They cost less than $10 for the two.

                        I put a 1“ x 2” x 15” stop on the bottom of the jig and another stop between the rails on the top at the other end to stop the saw after it has traversed 4’. Both are placed at right angles to the slot.
                        The bottom stop is used to set the jig at right angles to the long side of the sheet.

                        After I built the jig I sanded and waxed it between the rails and on its bottom and waxed the bottom of the foot on the circular saw.
                        The first time I used the jig I had to cut through the bottom stop because the saw must start in front of the side of the sheet to be cut.

                        To use the jig place the full sheet on two 2 x 4’s supported by sawhorses. Mark the cut line with an ice pick (sharpened) so you can feel the cut line through the holes in the jig and align the jig using the bottom stop to set the end up against the side of the sheet. If you can see use a pencil instead of the ice pick. Once the jig is in place clamp it on to the sheet and have at it.

                        This jig took me about an hour to build and works so slick you can't believe it. No tear out, no danger, fast and accurate.

                        Blind Bill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                          For those interested in the 50" All-in-One and are not in a big hurry to buy one, these go on sale for around $26 at any number of places. IIRC, I've seen them for around that price at Highland Woodworking, Rockler and Amazon. I also own the 24" version, paid $15 on sale for it, that I like to use for smaller pieces and with my router.
                          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                            Also, for the All-In-One clamps it's not difficult to make your own plates for your router or Circ Saw.

                            A 1/4" toilet bolt fits the top slot nicely. It's pretty simple to rout a groove in a board to ride the top of the clamp, and then attach a piece of Plexiglas or hardboard to mount your router or saw to. I even made a stop block so I can make stopped cuts or routs w/o having to worry about over-cutting.

                            http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=16448
                            ---------------
                            Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                            ---------------
                            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                            ---------
                            "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                            ---------
                            sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Guide for Circular Saw

                              Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
                              I use an All-in-One clamp.
                              BadgerDave-

                              I've never seen that one before. It looks pretty good. A better price than some of the guides out there.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X