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Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

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  • Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

    I'm going to top my cabnets with some built up crown and need advise on best tool. I have a Dewalt 12" sliding compound miter saw, my 3650's stock miter guage but have'nt got around to building a slide yet. I am willing to buy a good after market miter guage.
    Thanks for any advise

  • #2
    Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

    Since you already have a good miter saw, I suggest checking it for accuracy and then try some cuts with it instead of spending money on other things.
    A miter guage on a table saw is a very tough way to cut crown. The guage is usually not tall enough and unless you spend BIG BUCKS on a really accurate one, the cuts won't be accurate enough.

    On crown, it comes beveled on the back side 2 different ways.
    One way is 45 degrees on each back surface. When installed, it will sit at a 45degree angle between the wall and ceiling.
    The second is whats called a "38-52". The back surfaces (wall and ceiling) are cut at different angles to position the crown farther down on the wall for better reveal and a nicer look. Make sure you know which one you are using if you are going to be doing compound miter cuts. It gets confusing. If you need the saw settings, let me know, I have them here.

    OR.............Just cut the crown upside down in the saw like this.

    With crown, I cut mine upside down in my miter saw with the crown "top" sitting on the bed of the saw and the "wall" edge of the crown against the back of the saw. Place it in the saw so those two surfaces are sitting on the saw parts the same with they will sit on the wall and ceiling. Then just swing the saw right or left 45 degrees and presto, when you turn the crown over, it's correct. You can remember it this way too, the saw FENCE is the WALL, the saw BED is the CEILING.



    On the sled, i've never used one but a friend has one and he does NOT like it nor does he use it. If you are cutting big pieces, I guess its ok, but for the everyday table saw user, I think they are way to specialized and expensive.

    Mark
    Last edited by The Wood Meister; 08-25-2007, 12:56 PM.
    Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

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    • #3
      Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

      I did not see this method posted, so I will stick my nose in for a few seconds. I recently put up about 160' of crown molding and made cuts for about 26 corners, several that were not 90 degrees. I used a hand-me-down Makita 12" miter saw to make the cuts. I laid the molding flat and referred to a chart on how to set the miter and bevel for each cut. I found laying the molding flat was easier than standing it up on an angle because it did not have a tendency to slip mid-cut. Your mileage may vary. Do a Google search for "crown molding angle chart" and you will find several.

      This was my first attempt at crown molding. Everyone who has seen my work thinks I had a professional install it. Be forewarned, if you are meticulous like me, it will take many cuts to sneak up on the right dimension for the perfect fit. By the time I finished the job, I was getting pretty good at getting the right fit in 3-4 cuts.
      -Ike
      Last edited by VegasGuy; 08-30-2007, 12:26 PM. Reason: correct typo

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      • #4
        Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

        Just a few suggestions for future crown molding work:

        Clamp a piece of *straight* scrap stock in place across your miter saw table. You'll need four clamps, two on each side of the blade. The location of the straightedge should be flush up against your crown molding with the two faces properly engaged against the table and the fence.

        Then make a cut on both the left and right 45's.

        This will leave you with a support stop and a zero clearance reference for each side of the miter. Then you just set the crown up against the fence. In the picture WoodMeister posted, just imagine a stretch of support stock on the left side of the molding, clamped in place.

        Same basic principle as this:
        http://www.benchdog.com/crowncut.htm

        This works for both 45/45 crown molding as well as the 38/52 described above. Remember, crown should be upside down when you cut! Fence = Wall. Table = ceiling.

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        • #5
          Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

          Vegasguy.....I have done it that way too. Like you say, it is easier to manage long pieces when they are laying flat. I ended up making 2 wood "T" stands for my miter saw. It sets on an old folding contraption that (forgot the name darnit!) can hold tools or clamp wood or stuff to cut. Anyways, my stands are the same height as my saw bed.

          I have the chart for those compound cuts but man-o-man did it get cornfusing for me. I've been cutting it "my way" for so long I just could not get the hang of it in a reasonable time.
          Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

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          • #6
            Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

            I also lay it flat on the miter saw.
            Not too hard once you figure the angles (and determine that your saw is cutting square!)
            Last edited by res057; 09-01-2007, 12:16 AM.
            ‎"I've never let my schooling interfere with my education" -Mark Twain

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            • #7
              Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

              Originally posted by The Wood Meister View Post
              I have the chart for those compound cuts but man-o-man did it get cornfusing for me. I've been cutting it "my way" for so long I just could not get the hang of it in a reasonable time.
              It made my head hurt trying to figure it out in the beginning, too.

              What I found was this: The current cut will be the exact opposite of the previous cut. In other words, if the bevel for the previous cut was +30 degrees and the miter was -35.3 degrees, then your current cut will be -30 degrees and +35.3 degrees. I am doing this from memory so I may have the +- backwards. What I do remember was constantly rotating the miter and bevel in the opposite directions for each new cut.

              I put up crown molding that had a repeating pattern every 8". Getting the pattern to match up in each corner was the trickiest part. When putting up crown molding with a pattern, start in the corner that is least visible to the observer, usually the corner above the entry to the room. You want to start there because this is the corner you will finish last and will be the one corner that the pattern does not match.

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              • #8
                Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

                I don't do any house crown, just on my entertainment centers and kitchens and mantles.

                I did some searching for anyone that would like the compound miter chart and found one at the DeWalt site here.

                http://www.dewalt.com/us/articles/ar...odworking&ID=2


                Mark
                Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Miter saw, Miter guage or sled

                  Agree with res 100%!! I have installed 3 and 4 piece crown in Atlanta for many years now,and i find cutting flat works best for me.

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