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  • crown molding jig

    good day,
    I have 5" 45 x 45 degree crown molding I need to cut. The manual for the ms1250lz states that a jig is required to place the molding correctly on the fence / table. With this molding, the height required for the jig runs right where the 2 holes are on the sliding fence. This will not work.
    I looked into flat cutting the molding, but the 35.6 degree mitre cannot be set accurately, or repeatedly. The 30 degree bevel is no problem as it does not change.
    How would I go about cutting this molding?

    thanks in advance
    Vega

  • #2
    Re: crown molding jig

    My 1250 has cm stops for both the tilt and and the table are you saying yours don't?
    SSG, U.S. Army
    Retired
    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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    • #3
      Re: crown molding jig

      Originally posted by TOD View Post
      My 1250 has cm stops for both the tilt and and the table are you saying yours don't?
      it does, but only for 52 / 38 degree crown, not 45 /45. I need 35.26 degree mitre and 30 bevel.

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      • #4
        Re: crown molding jig

        Just set the miter angle as close to 35.3 and the bevel angle to 30 as possible. I doubt that your wall is a perfect 90.

        You can also build a simple jig to cut the crown "in position."

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        • #5
          Re: crown molding jig

          Can you use the crown molding jig made by Bench Dog? I used it with my DeWalt for two room of crown molding with 90's and 45's and it worked fine for those.http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid=404796
          When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

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          • #6
            Re: crown molding jig

            thanks for the replies, is there any where in Canada to purchase the bench dog?

            Vega

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            • #7
              Re: crown molding jig

              I bought mine at Home Depot.
              When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

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              • #8
                Re: crown molding jig

                I think you are better off without the jig. Cut the crown flat (35.3 mitre and 30 bevel) and cope cut the ends to make a nice joint.

                There is a reason why crown jigs are always in the discount bin.

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                • #9
                  Re: crown molding jig

                  I agree with frankiln, cut flat whenever possible for repeated accuracy. If you need,once u get ur mitre and bevel correct mark your mitre and bevel gauge. This will ensure accuracy as well.

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                  • #10
                    Re: crown molding jig

                    Just position the molding on your saw like this, top of crown sitting on the table, wall side of crown against the fence. It makes NO difference what the angles of the back side are, if properly setting in the saw, it will cut right every time, whether 45 inside or outside miters.

                    Congratulations to Mr. "the sky is falling" Al Gore, nominated the new Village Idiot!

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                    • #11
                      Re: crown molding jig

                      We just finished a crown molding job in our house, using both the jig and just holding the molding as shown by WoodMeister. Both methods worked, but be very careful when measuring, marking, and cutting. Make sure that you cut where you think you should. We got some pieces that were off just enough to make us look like rookies (which we are, anyway).

                      It also seemed that an outside cut made without the jig didnt quite match up with the matching cut made with the jig

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                      • #12
                        Re: crown molding jig

                        You can "simulate" the jig by just clamping some straight stock across your miter saw table and the edge of your crown molding when it is set at the proper position. It helps to have a helper for this setup.

                        Place crown molding with the two edges properly and fully set against the fence and table. Have helper hold it nice and tight in place. Lay a straight piece of stock across the table, up against the crown's top, and clamp it down. Note you need 4 clamps - 2 for each side of the blade. Make sure they don't block the blade at 45 degree miters.

                        Make a 45 degree cut each way and now you have a) a zero-clearance reference line for the blade and b) a stop that holds the crown exactly where you need.

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                        • #13
                          Re: crown molding jig

                          The only problem with "bedding " the crown in the saw,is the inconsistencies.When you postion the crown just right ,then pull the trigger the motor often makes the crown vibrate and slide a lil bit. But when you have a jig,as described by Wood Junkie,that eliminates this problem. Great tips as always guys! Love this place!

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                          • #14
                            Re: crown molding jig

                            Here we go, I found a picture describing what I'm talking about. Though this one is actually a constructed jig, instead of just a clamped board.

                            http://www.installcrown.com/Crown_mo...s/IMAG020A.JPG

                            Using a simple / adjustable jig means you can use crown with any spring angle.

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                            • #15
                              Re: crown molding jig

                              Because none of my walls are perfectly straight or have proper corner angles I usually always cope them. They all look perfect when done correctly.

                              This might be helpful:
                              http://www.installcrown.com/

                              http://www.miterclamp.com/Installing_crown_molding.htm
                              “If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace” - Thomas Paine

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