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Cleaning TS2424 surface

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  • Cleaning TS2424 surface

    I would like advice on cleaning the cast iron surface of a TS2424 table saw. The saw I have was a demnonstator model I purchased from Home Depot during the last days of 2001. Its surface had advertising stickers, one covering the plastic insert and one approx 5 inches wide covering the right side from front to back adjacent to the mitering slot. I peeled off of the stickers and used a solvent recommended by the HD clerk to remove the adhesive gum residue. The solvent removed the residue very well. The plastic insert was left with minor blemishing I can probably live with but the cast iron surface I like to know if there is something I can do. Where the large sticker was there is now a shiny, pristine patch surrounded by a thin, dark border. I suspect that during the saw's time as a demonstrator it had a liquid spilled on it, likely coffee, and that this border is a rust stain. When I disassembled the table to move it to my basement I also notice the same stains at the extension joints. There is also a cup ring on the surface. Is there anything I can due to remove the stains and brighten up the remainder of the surface to match the freshly exposed patch?

  • #2
    Dave L
    Check a post on page two titled Treating Table Saw Top there is a good means there. I used the WD40 method and was very pleased. Good Luck [img]smile.gif[/img]

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    • #3
      Dave,

      Use WD-40 and a green scotch-brite pad and a little elbow grease. With some work you should be able to get rid of most of the rust. Once your cleaned off the the rust, clean the top to get rid of the WD residue, then wipe it dry. Finally give the top 4 or 5 good coats of paste wax.

      Jake

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      • #4
        Jake,

        What about sanding with 220 on a ROS. Will that hurt the surface? The reason I ask is I am restoring an old Sears 8" for my dad.
        -Rob<br /> <a href=\"http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/\" target=\"_blank\">http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/</a> <br />Damn, I hit the wrong nail again. Ouch that hurts

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        • #5
          Thanks all for the prompt replies. I only just started visiting the Ridgid website around a month ago and I like what I've seen. I'm new to this forum and didn't realize there is more than one page. I overlooked the page selection in the lower left. There is plenty to read and learn from.

          While typing this reply the book "Table Saw Techniques by Roger W. Cliffe" I ordered from Amazon.com arrived in the mail. A table saw owner I know recommended this book. I've only thumbed through the book so far, but for cleaning I noticed it recommends Scotch Brite pads to remove rust, autobody rubbing compound for polishing (can use a power polisher or not), and furniture paste wax for waxing. I'll try your advice but do you have any comments about the absence of WD40 and the use of rubbing compound?

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          • #6
            The way I do it (WD40, Scotch-Brite and finishing sander), the WD40 keeps the metal dust from going everywhere. Maybe makes the Scotch-Brite last a little longer because of the lubrication, but mostly dust control.

            Can't say on polishing, because I don't want a polished tablesaw top. There is no upside to my knowledge for this. I would be grateful to know if Dr. Cliffe listed any reason to polish it?

            Dave

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            • #7
              You can use a ROS but I wouldn't use sandpaper. There are scotch brite pads made to fit on a ROS (Though I can't think of who has them at this time). Something else I found that worked, back when I was on the road and in HDs all the time, was one of those spiral cut saws with the right angle attachment and the scotch bright pad for that. The only down fall is that it puts swirl marks in the finish, for those of you who insist on the factory finish.

              A couple of reasons to use WD are; one to lube the scotch-brite and keep it from scratching up the table surface. If you have a machine with a fine surface, like a band saw and you just go straight at it with a scotch bright pad, you will see all sorts of swirl marks. Second it helps cut the rust as you clean it.

              Jake

              [ 01-09-2002: Message edited by: JSchnarre ]

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              • #8
                Using WD40 and the green Scotch Brite pads works really well. The surface brightens up and the cup ring is gone. The thin dark border I mentioned in my first posting isn't completely gone, but it is almost faded enough not to bother with any more. When I look at the surface from oblique angles I can see very faint swirls from my scrubbing. I think I can minimize the faint swirls by keeping my strokes relatively light, numerous, and in random directions also if I apply this method evenly to the entire surface I'll also minimize any impact on surface flatness. I agree with you guys, WD40's role in this method is for chemical breaking up of grim and rust, a lubricant tempering the abrasive action, and a flow agent carrying away debris.

                The surfaces I've done are looking good enough that I'm thinking no more abrasion is necessary. I'll forgo using the rubbing compound. I looked through Roger Cliffe's book and couldn't find reasons why he recommends polishing with rubbing compound. I'm speculating that after focusing on the rust with the pads that one might be able to achieve a more even surface finish using the compound and a wool bonnet attached to power drill. Is rubbing compound less abrasive that WD40 and pads? Hmmm, maybe an experiment is needed.

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                • #9
                  "Is rubbing compound less abrasive that WD40 and pads?"

                  Oh yes, definitely. How much so depends on how coarse the rubbing compound is, but the coarsest I've ever used is a lot finer than a Scotch-Brite green. By "less abrasive", I am assuming you mean "of finer grit".

                  Dave

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