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  • Replacing Table saw Motor?

    I have a 20-25 year old Sears Table saw it's tired and needs a boost. I would like to replace the motor. The Model is 113.298240, if that helps. It currently has a 1HP 3450RPM 40Amp 60Hz Ph1 113.12202 motor I'm thinking of replacing it with a motor I found at Harbor Ffright Tools. Now I'm not sure if I should just replace it with a 1HP motor or would it be beneficial to upgrade to their 1.5HP motor the price differents is only $12. The models I'm looking at are Item 4114-6VGA 1.5HP for $126.99 or the 1HP at $117.99 Model# 4113-5VGA. Both Motors are 3600RPM, Ph1 115Volts and matching to my current frame of 56. Open to any suggestions
    Last edited by Dillion; 10-05-2007, 12:56 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Replacing Table saw Motor?

    I would go with the 1.5hp, this sill keep you within the frame stress design points and give you a little extra reserve power

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    • #3
      Re: Replacing Table saw Motor?

      I'd go for a 1.5hp too...no more than a 2hp. HF motors tend to be overstated a bit. Check Ebay for some decent deals on used too.

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      • #4
        Re: Replacing Table saw Motor?

        Thanks guys I'll do the 1.5 Thanks again

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        • #5
          Re: Replacing Table saw Motor?

          Please do yourself a favor and run a few checks before replacing the motor. If you know someone that's into electrical or electronics he/she can be a big help here.

          1. Try to obtain a good AC Voltmeter that has a 0-150 Volt range if your saw is setup for 120 Volts or a 0-250 or 0-300 Volt range if it's setup for 240 Volts.

          2. Using care connect it to the terminals in the motor where power connects and be sure to prevent them (test leads) from shorting together.

          3. Obtain the following and please post it.
          A) Voltage with motor running under no load
          B) Voltage as motor is starting up. (This may be a little hard to read fast enough, but please give it a try)
          C) With saw unplugged, the Voltage at the receptacle.

          4. If you plan to setup the new motor for 120 Volt operation, be sure the switch on your table saw is rated for 2HP or higher.

          5. Be sure you have a private circuit for your table saw.

          6. Check condition of power cord, plug and receptacle.

          If you have any notable Voltage drop problems either at startup or with the motor running, they need to be corrected. Without enough power a motor can't startup properly or produce rated power.

          With the belt(s) removed does the current motor start fast, run smooth and coast down to a stop smoothly? I'm wondering if maybe replacing the starting capacitor and motor bearings won't bring new life to your current motor. The older USA made motors are much better built and can produce more power (per rating) than the imports. Before spending good money on a replacement motor it may pay to be sure the old one really should be replaced and not just fixed up a little. Also be sure the arbor bearings are smooth. If they have gone bad they need to be replaced. A good quality new belt is a must no matter what route you go. A ruff or lumpy belt can make a machine run poorly and replacing it can make a huge change.

          My bet is you've done the above and really feel the old motor has had it, but please be sure. I'll put some of the old timer 1 HP motors up beside the newer 2 HP motors and rip the new ones apart.

          Hint: Check the bare weight of the old motor and then the new 1-1/2 HP from Harbor Freight.
          Last edited by Woussko; 10-06-2007, 12:27 AM.

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