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Difference between beading & roundover router bits

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  • Difference between beading & roundover router bits

    As far as I can tell, the only difference between a 1/4 round over router bit and 1/4 beading bit is the size of bearing?? Is this correct?? If so, can you route beads and roundovers with the same bit by simply changing the bearing to the appropriate size? And I guess adjusting the height of the bit.

    Thanks Dennis - now the proud owner of a used, in great shape milwaukee router - for $65!

  • #2
    Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

    Congrats on the router, they are an amazing tool with almost infinite applications.
    Your take on the corner round is not quite as I understand it. You can get a different profile by using a smaller bearing on a corner round bit as shown below but a true 'bead' has a half round in it as in bottom pic.

    Corner Round Bit



    Edge Beading Bit

    Last edited by wbrooks; 10-10-2007, 07:15 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

      I think it's how you use the bit as to whether it's classified as a roundover or a bearing. If you look at the top picture in Wayne's post the profile that is on the piece of wood is considered a roundover but the alternate image shown is considered a beaded edge by some bit manufacturers. So, your take on that style of bit is basically correct.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

        From my limited experience, I believe the bearing diameter is the main difference, as it defines how the cutting edge of the bit is going to mate with the stock. Also, the bit needs to have a cutting edge perpendicular to the rounding edge, at both the top and bottom.

        At the top of the bit, the mounted bearing is usually flush with the radius of the cut, on a "roundover" bit. As mentioned, if you change the bearing to a smaller diameter, than the cut can be moved further into the stock, thus providing the "edge" or "step" that defines a "beading" profile.

        That's how I understand it anyway. I'll be attempting this shortly, so we shall see.

        CWS

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        • #5
          Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

          Thanks. The reason I ask is that Woodcraft currently has a 4 peice router bit set on sale for $20. It includes a 1/4 beading bit (see: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...ading%20router for they are calling a beading bit). However, I need a 1/4 round over bit, as in Waynes top picture. I wondered if I could just change the bearing?? While looking at Rockler for a pic of what woodcraft is calling a beading bit, I found this: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=10328 which seems to answer the question. The guy at woodcraft was really pushing a single 1/4 round bit as they were out of the set that was on sale. Hmmm..... a single 1/4 round bit for $24 or a set of 4 for $20 . I'll wait until they get some more in

          I can't wait to use the Milwakee router with some quality 1/2 inch bits. I've been using a really cheap "master something or other" brand router and table that was $80 from Costco together with a cheap set of 1/4 router bits.

          Cheers Dennis

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          • #6
            Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

            If you adjust the height of the router bit that you show in your first link so that only the roundover part come into contact with the wood then you would be using the bit only as a roundover.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              Re: Difference between beading & roundover router bits

              You are correct, most roundovers can be converted to beading bits by changing the bearing. In order to do this, the bottom of the carbide, next to the bearing must be ground with clearance. Some companies, especially the imports, skip this step to cut cost.

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