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what should I use to protect the surface of my TS?

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  • what should I use to protect the surface of my TS?

    I just bought a TS3650. I store the TS in my garage. The problem is that my garage is a brick, 2 car, detatched garage. Needlees to say, I am afraid of the moisture building up on the saw and ultimately causing rust. What shouold I do to protect the surface? It was suggested that I use an oil to protect the surface. Could I cover up the table with some sort of material or would a cover trap the moisture inside? I am new to this site and I am fairly new to woodworking and appreciate any help.

  • #2
    You should put on at least 3 coats of a paste wax. Johnsons seems to be the most favored in this forum, but I use bowling alley wax. What ever you do use, make sure that it is a paste, but not a car wax. Also, it must not contain silicon for the residue that gets on your wood will mess up the finish of the piece you are working on. I hope that this helps.

    Jim

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    • #3
      You can do a search on this forum and find more than you will have time to read on the subject. Like jjaO I use Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax. I think that it has less petroleum smell. I made sure that the surface was good and clean and rustfree( mine was a new 3612 over a year ago). Put at least three coats on, polishing between coats.

      Mine resides in similar garage that is not tight at all. Looks like new. I cover it with an old cotton thermal blanket that breathes. I try to refrain from putting any stray items on it but without success. Blanket keeps items from causing condensaton on table.

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      • #4
        Believe me, you will get rust quickly in that environment. I know because I do. I can avoided it (or at least keep it at a min.) by applying a regular coat of furniture grade paste wax. I use Miniwax clear or Briwax clear, but others will work. I do the same for all other cast iron or rustable tops. It not only prevents rust it also keeps the table slick. Apply frequently (at least once a month, and more often if humidity is high and/or you're using the tool heavily). I use T-9 to remove moderate to heavy rust with maroon sanding pad and mineral spirits with #000 or #0000 steel wool for light stuff. Wax after removing the rust.

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        • #5
          The current issue of WOOD magazine has an article dealing with rust removal and prevention. Surprised the heck out of me but paste wax was rated very low for rust prevention. Boeshield T-9 was the highest rated product for prevention but was unrated for rust removal. A product called Empire Topsaver rated highest for rust removal and second highest for prevention. Their overall picks were;
          A. Boeshield Rust-Free (Rust Removal)
          B. Boeshield T-9 (Rust Prevention)
          C. Empire TopSaver (Combination Removal/Prevention)
          I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

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          • #6
            The rust removal I was referring to above was the Boeshield Rust and Stain Remover, which is made by the same company that makes the rust prevention, T-9. I've used T-9 for prevention and it's good, but I found I had to remove it before using the machinery and apply paste wax. T-9 is not slick. I would use if I weren't going to use my tools for a lengthy time.

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            • #7
              does it matter if your table saw top is aluminum? are the waxes mentioned still good for that surface?

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              • #8
                No,yes. While alum isn't going to rust it can sure corrode. I had forgotten the Wood Mag article. I still like my Butcher's, but have not tried the others. The Butcher's sure keeps the 3612 rails and fence slick too (alum).

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                • #9
                  Lots of good advise. One thing not mentioned which I find has worked for me is a piece of cardboard to cover the cast iron surface. I have a set of tools I leave on a trailer to take from jobsite to jobsite and this has worked as well as anything. I still use minwax finishing paste wax but found that alone didn't do the job for me. My exposure is extreme everyday. Somedays I have to use a hair dryer to get motors warm enough to work...LOL The cardboard absorbs the moisture before it hits the surface

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                  • #10
                    I started with Johnson paste wax but it smudged too easily for my tastes. I now use topcote. It's workin very well for me. Sprays on even, wipe it off a couple seconds later. Has a nice slick feel to the cast iron after ti's applied.


                    Gets my vote

                    Jake

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                    • #11
                      In addition to coatings, HTC makes machine covers that keep dust off and are designed to help prevent rust. HTC makes them in various sizes. I've seen them in a few catalogs but don't have any idea as to how well they keep work as a rust preventor.

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                      • #12
                        bayou, I have used them on al. surfaces without any problem for 3-4 years.

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                        • #13
                          Paste wax will help teh pieces slide better across the surface. Boeshield T-9 helps the parts slide better, but not quite as well. I have a can of T-9 and use it in the winter, while teh wax gets put on for summer use. I would not hesitate to buy the T-9 again. Great product.

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