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  • #16
    Re: wood chisels

    The Woodworkers Journal has an interesting article about the US Supplier of the Two Cherries brand that was mentioned above. Sorta lets you know he's behind the tools he supplies.

    http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/ww...ustryinterview

    See ya when the sawdust clears,
    Hector

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    • #17
      Re: wood chisels

      Get the fatmaxs

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      • #18
        Re: wood chisels

        I have two sets of chisels. The one set I use on the job site for basic chiseling/all-purpose work. The second set is strictly for woodworking projects.

        Now I am a practical, thrifty type of guy. I prefer not to spend hundreds of dollars on any one particular tool. Instead I look for the overall value of a tool and I spend according to the performance I can derive from that particular tool.

        My job site chisels are a 3-piece set of Nicholson chisels that have a file, on the flat bottom-side, and wood rasp, on the arched top-side. They come in 1/4", 1/2", and 3/4" sizes (about $20 for the set) and are very useful for many jobs I encounter on various job-sites.

        My second set (strictly for woodworking) are a 5-piece set of Craftsman chisels (about $40.) I like them very much and they do a great job. And if they ever break they have that famous Craftsman lifetime warranty!

        The one key thing to remember is to keep your chisels SHARP, SHARP, SHARP! A sharp chisel is the best working chisel!
        Last edited by CARPENTERDON; 10-29-2007, 11:47 PM.
        Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
        Historic Renovations, Restoration, & Custom Log Homes


        I Beat The Competition Hammersdown!

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        • #19
          Re: wood chisels

          I use some older Stanley chisels with the transparent yellow handles and steel caps. The best lesson I learned was to make sure the back is flat. On cheaper chisels (like mine) this takes quite a bit of honing. I use wet/dry sandpaper on a float glass plate to flatten the backs. The top of a table saw would also work. Once the back is flat I can put a much better edge on the chisel. After sharpening, a few strokes on a leather strop charged with sharpening compound (green) really finishes the job.

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          • #20
            Re: wood chisels

            I alway keep an eye on Ebay. I picked up a Lie-Nielsen Socket Chisel Set with the Leather roll for 125.00, Though this was a lucky deal the set was new and still had the factory burr on the blades

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            • #21
              Re: wood chisels

              I was in both of my local Home Depots last week(one on the way home from work, and the other near home), picking up supplies for a project and came across the chisel department in each. Both still had several sets if the 4pc Irwin Blue Marples with the Sheffield markings. I remembered this post and picked up a set for $29.99. They all have a bit of a burr on them from the factory. I plan on giving them a good sharpening before I put them to use on furniture projects where I mostly use them "for mostly hand with the occasional light tap" which suits their 25 deg. bevel. They will sit proudly next to my 30 year old Craftsman 5 pc yellow handled/steel capped set which will now be used for more of the heavier work, "for mallet assist" in the shop, that their 30 deg. bevel is more suited to. The Craftsmans always sharpen up nice and hold their edge well. I hope the Marples are as good or better.
              See ya when the sawdust clears,
              Hector

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              • #22
                Re: wood chisels

                I've got a couple of sets but the one I use most often are the Marples, I've yet to have an issue with them and they are my go-to chisel in most cases. I've also got a cheap piece of crap Harbor Freight set that I use to clean up nasty stuff where precision isn't necessary but I don't want my decent chisels anywhere near it, they sharpen up reasonably well and get the job done.

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                • #23
                  Re: wood chisels

                  I've got the same sets as Cephus. Job-site chisels are cheap Ace Hardware store brand. I keep them sharp, and took the time to flatten the backs. They're decent chisels for beating on, although I've chipped the smallest one (1/4"). I'll regrind it at some point.

                  My shop chisels are Irwins. I'm pretty sure they're made in UK Irwins. I've never seen a "china" stamp on them, but they do have a Made in England stamp. They are used regularly and sharpened as needed. I love the weight balance on them. They're very comfortable and easy to maneuver.

                  I keep all my chisels "scary sharp" with micro-bevels. This process is simple, and results in a good, lasting, edge that's easily reproduced. I try to keep the little plastic covers, especially for the ones that end up in my tool bag. Since the Irwin's never leave the shop, the plastic end covers are .... well, they're around...somewhere... I keep them in the box they came in and make sure they always go back in the box when I finish up in the shop. A good set of chisels is an investment. Think not only of the purchase cost, but of they time you'll spend using them. A good set of chisels will last and last, providing a lifetime of reliable use. Spend $80-150 once, or spend $20 over and over. I hate shopping...so I'll go with the purchase them once plan!
                  I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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