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Why not metric?

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  • Why not metric?

    I downloaded the TS3612 manual and was reading it over b4 I started on putting mine together and noticed something odd. The odd things is that the tools required to put this TS together were standard and not metric. After all these years of buying metric to work on cars, it seems now I have to buy standard. Also do I really need a framing sq?

    BTW, this is really funny to me because back in the 80's it was the same standard vs metric but the other way. You see, I was in high school so the only tools I had access to were dad's and he only had standard tools. Well everthing I was working on was in metric, bikes, cars and whatever else. Now it seem's I actually have to go buy standard tools...... seems crazy to me that Ridgid would still by using standard.

    - Dae

  • #2
    > "Why not metric?"

    Because the French invented the metric system.

    That's why.

    John
    Eastchester, NY

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    • #3
      As one who once needed a 5mm stainless hex head cap screw to finish the installation of an alternator late on a Saturday evening, I say "God save us from metric anything."

      That said, in this day and age, yes, your box does need to contain a complete set of both SAE and metric wrenchs and sockets. C'est la monde.

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      • #4
        If it's important to you, to me, the standard bolts tell me it's made in the USA. Of course, Made in USA doesn't mean you can't find something needing metric either----it's all a conspiricy to sell more Craftsman wrenches

        Second question--yes you do need a "good" framing square.
        Dave

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        • #5
          I'm kinda glad the saws are still SAE bolted. I own one metric set, but it's not for the cars. The newest one in the driveway will always be the '78 SS unless Jana wins the lotto and wants her Prowler. Oddly enough, there is one metric bolt somewhere on the Elky, but I can't remember which one it is.
          Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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          • #6
            SAE vs. metric fasteners has become a not-to-reliable indicator of product origin. I have a big diesel engine on my boat; the engine was manufactured in Avon, Massachusetts. The starter, though, uses 8 mm cap screws for mounting to its bracket. Turns out the starter (and its bracket) were made by Mitshubishi. (Diesels need far more robust starters than gasoline engines, and I found out that Mitsubishi apparently makes a good line of starters for its line of trucks.) The conclusion you reach is that your toolbox needs an equally good and broad array of both SAE and metric wrenches and sockets.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by john54:
              > "Why not metric?"

              Because the French invented the metric system.

              That's why.

              John
              Eastchester, NY
              You crack me up
              Alan
              My Shop

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