Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Finger (box) joint jig for router table Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Finger (box) joint jig for router table

    When I posted the "New router -new table" you could see some sled that rolls on the table edges.

    When I used it first time, I made a box or finger joints.

    So here is all the story...please note that I'm cutting all the 4 boards of the box in one shot.

    The TS sled that you can see on the two first pics, is also rolling and is never binding due to weather changes nor gets loose ever but, that's different story....

    Regards
    niki










































  • #2
    Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table
















    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

      Although I love the simplicity of your tool creations and the usage I've seen here, 9.7cm is not 4". 10.16cm is. What you've got there is 3.819 inches.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

        Hi Duff

        I usually convert Metric to Inches to a practical numbers.

        From your profession, I can see that you are working with very accurate numbers...by the way, in the Nuclear plant, do you work with Metric or English system

        I don't think that it's practical to translate 9.7cm to 3.81886" so, usually I round it up or down to something more practical like 4"...and, I do it all the time, 6mm are not 1/4" and 10mm are not 3/8" but, I also know that you don't have a 6mm Threaded Rod...

        I work in Metric, the "translation" to Inches is there only when I post on the American forums so the guys that don't like or think in metric will also get some idea of the dimensions that usually are just for reference and not so important in those cases.

        Regards
        niki

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

          Hi niki,
          Most do understand the concept of finger joints but are unsure what to do when things don’t line up, are too lose or too tight and what or how can it be salvaged. We always SEE the ones that came out great but there’s a whole slue of things that can go wrong. So what’s good or what’s “good enough”. Showing that the bit broke the edges on the last cut was excellent.

          Now folks, how do you fix or correct that problem on the current box or the next box?
          Jim

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

            Originally posted by JJCiesla View Post
            Now folks, how do you fix or correct that problem on the current box or the next box?
            Hmmmm....seems like the real innovation in woodworking is solving these kinds of problems! Good question, JJCiesla!

            For the current box, there's a couple options. One is to simply trim the blow-out section off the one piece, then trim all the rest of the box pieces to the same dimension. Could be done on the table saw with fingerboards properly set and some push sticks. Although, depending on the amount of blowout (and your tools), you could also glue up the box as is, then use a belt sander to sand that end of the box, removing the blowout. A jack plane might work too, but you'd get blowout on the sides.

            For the subsequent boxes, using a backer piece on the sides would be the solution. That would stop the blowout from happening.

            So Niki...are you going to post the TS finger joint jig? Pretty please?
            I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

              Originally posted by VASandy View Post
              So Niki...are you going to post the TS finger joint jig? Pretty please?
              I would doubt it because euro saws don't accept dados.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table

                Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                So Niki...are you going to post the TS finger joint jig? Pretty please?
                Originally posted by cpw View Post
                I would doubt it because euro saws don't accept dados.
                Very correct....my TS has a short arbor and will not accept Dado blades...

                Dado blades are prohibited in EU [even though, I know that some guys (amateurs) with old TS's are still using them] and the reason is....

                There is a Safety regulation that states: "The blade must stop within 10 seconds" (on my TS it stops in 6 seconds) but, the inertia forces involved, can cause the opening of the arbor nut and blades bigger than 10", has a hole that fits into the arbor pin to "lock" the blade.

                Naturally, dado blade has bigger mass and can cause the opening of the arbor nut so they prohibited it's use all over the EU.

                And now, you can understand why I had to make a special sled for the router even though, I would be more happy to use the TS with dado blade

                That's the original blade and you can see the holes that fit (only one needed) into the arbor pin...but I removed the pin so, I'll be able to use also other (older) blades...

                Please note that the arbor is of 30mm (1ΒΌ")...standard in EU...

                Attachment

                Regards
                niki
                Attached Files
                Last edited by niki; 08-16-2008, 02:42 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Finger (box) joint jig for router table - fix blowout

                  Hey all - I've been avidly reading and digesting this list of tips n tricks by Niki (and frankly I'm amazed, so many good ideas!!) - 1st post on this forum and it's an old thread but... to stop the blowout at the edge, I think a smaller spacer for the last cut so that the wood passes over only half of the router blade, therefore only cutting half of the last finger joint, then use the normal one and finish it off.

                  I think the reason for that particular blowout looks like it was because the outer edge of the wood lined up with the outer edge of the blade and allowed the fibers to flex round the cutting edge rather than be sheared off.

                  Having said all that I'm still only just getting into the hobby, and have not made many things, but have watched all the woodworking programs I can get in UK, and have watched New Yankee workshop probably a dozen times per episode (and deeply wish I could see all the stuff you get in US), and I think that's where the above solution may have come from.

                  edit: looking at it again - and re-reading it I can see the last cut was only 10mm deep (because of first spacer) so it wasn't the edge - I think it might have been the cutting direction of the router bit? Because the spin of the bit was in an anticlockwise direction when it met the wood just as it reached the edge because there was no support (so it would shear off) it blew it out, so some sacrificial wood on that side should solve it as VASandy said : "using a backer piece on the sides would be the solution".
                  Last edited by Rafe Zetter; 04-12-2012, 08:09 AM.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X