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Older tools that might have been made by Ridge Tool Corp.

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  • Older tools that might have been made by Ridge Tool Corp.

    Although it does not appear that Ridgid likes to discuss the timeframe that some Craftsman tools were made by Ridgid, I would like to know if this topic can be discussed.

  • #2
    I don’t mind discussing the fact that many of the Craftsman power tools were made by Emerson.

    First let me give you a little background on Emerson and Ridgid. Ridge Tool Co was purchased by Emerson Electric in, I believe, 1963. At the same time another division of Emerson Electric called Emerson Special Products Division. was making woodworking tools for Sears under the Craftsman name. Fast forward to 1998 Sears decides to look overseas for its core tools and we as SPD have to look for another way to sell our tools. The name RIDGID was used and the tools were given a lifetime warranty, along with many updates and the introduction of several completely new tools. A close relationship with Home Depot was formed and they became our exclusive distributors and SPD was renamed Emerson Tool Company.

    Many of the tools that we currently produce are very similar to the Craftsman tools, but since RIDGID is our own brand and since we are no longer just a supplier, we have flexibility and an ability to innovate that we never had before. Keep an eye out in the next few years as we grow out of the Craftsman tools in to our own as Emerson Tool Company. We are now focused on producing top of the line DIY and Contractor tools with innovative features and functional well thought out design.

    Ryobi now makes Sears woodworking tools. We still make the Craftsman Wet/Dry Vacs. I hope that gives everyone a basic idea of what the relationship between RIDGID woodworking tools and Craftsman woodworking tool consists of.

    Jake Schnarre
    Product Manager
    Emerson Tool Company

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    • #3
      Great! it just seemed that the relationship never existed once the distribution ended. I would think that relationship had proven lucrative for both companies. I have been trying to locate some information on a lathe that I inherited from my father. The lathe has never been used and I would love to get it running. The Sears model number is 103.21600. I was told, by Sears, that the 103 designated Emerson, although I read on another forum that the 103 indicated King-Sealey (or Steeley). I would like to get a copy of the instruction manual for the lathe as I want to know the recommended size, horsepower, pully ratio, etc. of the lathe. I would also like to know if there are any accessories, such as a faceplate for turning bowls, etc. Any information I can get would be appreciated.

      Mark

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      • #4
        113 generally indicates Emerson but I will check with some of the guys that have been around for a long time to see if they have any info

        Jake

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        • #5
          Did you ever get a chance to talk to the old timers to see if there is any more information. I found the paperwork that came with the lathe and the copyright date is 1952. There are no accessories listed for the lathe in the exploded view and parts list. The accompanying manual does indicate that there are three methods of attaching a faceplate for turning items like bowls. This model has a solid 5/8" shaft that has the spur attached with a set screw. I intend to have some faceplates cast to use for this purpose and was hoping to know if this would present a problem. Any ideas?

          Thanks for any advice you may have.

          Mark

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          • #6
            I have a Shopsmith that uses a 5/8" shaft to drive the lathe. It has a flat on it that setscrews on the various attachments tighten down on. Perhaps Shopsmith faceplates would work. They would be cheaper (even at Shopsmith prices) than custom machine work.

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            • #7
              <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MarkH:
              Did you ever get a chance to talk to the old timers to see if there is any more information<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

              Sorry, I have not, but let me see what I can do.

              Jake


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              • #8
                <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hamhand:
                I have a Shopsmith that uses a 5/8" shaft to drive the lathe. It has a flat on it that setscrews on the various attachments tighten down on. Perhaps Shopsmith faceplates would work. They would be cheaper (even at Shopsmith prices) than custom machine work.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


                Thanks for the information, I will check into this.


                [This message has been edited by MarkH (edited 11-28-2000).]

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