Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Bar gauge Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bar gauge

    Good day

    You know those two bars with the sharp edge to check diagonals.

    But, I had a problem...every time I pushed them into the corners, they were getting "dirty" from the glue squeeze-out.

    To overcome this problem, I made them like this....

    Regards
    niki

















  • #2
    Re: Bar gauge

    What are those things? I don't recall ever seeing anything like them.

    Tom

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bar gauge

      Hi Tom

      When you glue-up carcass or a frame, there are a few ways to check if they are square...one way, is with try square but for bigger carcasses, it's normal to check the diagonals lengths...if they are the same length, the carcass is square.

      Here you can see what I'm talking about
      http://www.veritastools.com/Products/Page.aspx?p=70

      Regards
      niki

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bar gauge

        I use a tape measure.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bar gauge

          I also use a ruler to check for square but I can see one advantage of using one of those bars. With no increments on the bar I would be forced to predetermine the diagonal length. Then I would set the bar to that length, insert it into the case and square it. I often have trouble with cauls or clamps above the case that interfere with my ruler.

          There must be a way to suspend the bar in the case and then clamp it. That way both hands can be used to adjust the case size.

          Tom
          Last edited by Tom W; 11-20-2007, 07:12 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bar gauge

            I can see Niki's idea. Clearly, this makes it VERY easy to determine square.

            To determine the correct length of the diagonal, you simply go back to basic Algebra.

            The diagonal (Hypotenuse) of any RIGHT triangle is A(2) + B(2) = C(2) Note: "(2)" means squared.

            So if you take the length or the rail, squared and the length of the stile, squared and add the two together, then the square root of the sum equals the length of the diagonal. To illustrate, remember the 3-4-5 rule:

            3(2) + 4(2) = 5(2) or 3x3 + 4x4 = 5x5 or
            9 + 16 = 25

            So if these were the dimensions of a face frame, then you would set the length of Niki's guage sticks to 5 in for the outside measurement. However, Niki's guages are for INSIDE measurements. No problem. Just measure the diagonal of the miter joint, or the distance from the outside corner to inside corner of the joint, multiply by two (2) and subtract from the OUTSIDE diagonal length and this gives you the length to set your guage sticks to.

            Now this seems like alot of work to go through, but is really useful if you are making several of the same size frames or carcasses so that you can quickly check for and set square.

            Oh, the hell with it, I'll just use my tape measure!

            Good luck, and I hope I was able to shed some light on the subject.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bar gauge

              With Niki's bar gauge (or any bar gauge) there is no need to know the actual (or theoretical) diagonal dimension. Simply fit the gauge to one of the diagonals (slide it to fit snugly) and then check its fit in the other diagonal. If it fits both ways you've got it square. If it doesn't fit you now know which diagonal is the longest and it is the one to squeeze shorter, until both diagonals are equal.

              A gauge such as Niki's is more accurate than a tape measure (unless your using one of those neat tape measure ends that Lee-Valley and Rockler are now selling).
              Dick

              Comment

              Working...
              X