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Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

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  • #16
    Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

    JoeC,
    I have not seen the "no dampener on miter saw" comment, but I know that the demo guys that sell WWII blades will say that they use and recommend them. Maybe Amazon's mistake comes from that?

    I appreciate the respectfulness of your disagreement. However, I'm at a loss to understand how the tooth grind can cause enough lateral pressure to increase vibration in any amount remotely detectable considering the speeds, distances, angles, body mass, and stiffness involved. ATB grinds are generally considered to be cleaner cutting than FTGs and TCGs, and Hi-ATB's are considered the cleanest cutting of all due to the sheering action of the cut. That wouldn't be true if there was vibration introduced by those grinds. There are typically in the range of 3-7 teeth buried in the wood at any given time if the blade was chosen correctly for the task (ATB grinds tend to be in the higher tooth count region). The alternate bevels should essentially balance out...if they didn't alternate, I could see there being some remote chance of causing lateral pressure, but not in an alternating setting, and not in any remotely significant amounts. The quality of the steel, balance of the blade, combined with the arbor runout of the saw, the grain of the wood itself in some cases , and even excessive heat are the heavy weight contributors to blade instability. Perhaps I'm wrong, but I don't see tooth grind being a detectable factor.
    hewood,
    I agree totally with what you have said.....but I was just relating my own experiences. I have seen places in the kerf, in the middle of a cut where the blade will "shudder" (for lack of a better word) making a wider kerf at that point. It seems to be, more often than not, an ATB where this happens.

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    • #17
      Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

      Longhair:

      For future reference...http://www.forrestblades.com/dampner.htm

      Maybe it's only Forrest that states that the dampener will not work on a miter saw - but as my dampener is a Forrest, I'll follow manufacturer's suggestions - for the time being, anyway...

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      • #18
        Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

        Boy I will probably hear it for this comments, but:

        My splitter stays at home, in the shop, in a cabinet or someplace other than ON my SAW!

        You simply DON"T need it! OK, OK, I'll explain!

        First TUNE UP your SAW! Make sure the blade is sqaure to the table at 90 and accurate at 45.

        Next, and a contributor to kick back, is to SQUARE, or more accurately, parallel your blade to the miter slots and square to the rails.

        Then parallel your fence to the blade and miter slots. If the fence is tight at the leading edge of the blade, then you are going to get a wobbly edge because there will be play at the rear. Conversely, if you are tight at the rear, then the stock will bind between the blade and fence and you are going to take one in the head!

        Possibly the only time I have used my splitter is when I am ripping some stock the wants to close up on the kerf. Using a simple finger board in a hold down application and a slightly MORE aggressive feed speed will get you through the cut so that you can true it up again, if need be. In this case, I have a shim shingle that I keep on my saw that can quickly be inserted into the kerf if the need arises. I also use it as a push stick when I am ripping thin stock. The sharp edge will form to the corner and allows you to keep your eyes on the piece and the blade.

        P.S.- I use Freud blades almost exclusively. I really like the 44 and 60 tooth HI-ATB blades. With a properly tuned saw and careful cutting, I get an edge straight and sharp enough to joint to another board for glue-up panels. I do not have a stabilizer, although I am going to get one for both my TS2400 and TS3650. It just seems to me that it can't hurt!
        Last edited by YankeeConCo; 12-01-2007, 09:52 AM.

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        • #19
          Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

          Originally posted by JoeC View Post
          I picked up a TS2400 last night during HD's incredible sale, and am wondering what blades users are replacing the stock blade with. I need to rip some 3/4" oak flooring (promised my wife I'd install hardwood flooring); I realize that the cuts will be under the base molding, but I still want them clean. I'll also be building some bookcases, and basement cabinets for my planned workshop. With the money saved from the HD sale, I can afford a Forrest WWII 40T, but is that the best blade for the 2400? I don't mind changing blades if necessary, so dedicated rip and crosscut blades are an option.

          Also, is there an issue with kerf and the splitter? I've read of instances with other saws where a splitter/riving knife was too thick for a thin kerf blade (the workpiece would jam on the splitter), or too thin for a wide kerf (splitter too thin to prevent kickback). Any known issues with the 2400? This is my first TS; while I've learned a lot lurking on this forum, I still have a lot to learn.

          Any info appreciated.
          No contest, I use Frued on all my saws
          Carpenters make the prettiest firewood

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          • #20
            Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

            Originally posted by YankeeConCo View Post
            Boy I will probably hear it for this comments, but:

            My splitter stays at home, in the shop, in a cabinet or someplace other than ON my SAW!

            You simply DON"T need it! OK, OK, I'll explain!

            First TUNE UP your SAW! Make sure the blade is sqaure to the table at 90 and accurate at 45.

            Next, and a contributor to kick back, is to SQUARE, or more accurately, parallel your blade to the miter slots and square to the rails.

            Then parallel your fence to the blade and miter slots. If the fence is tight at the leading edge of the blade, then you are going to get a wobbly edge because there will be play at the rear. Conversely, if you are tight at the rear, then the stock will bind between the blade and fence and you are going to take one in the head!

            Possibly the only time I have used my splitter is when I am ripping some stock the wants to close up on the kerf. Using a simple finger board in a hold down application and a slightly MORE aggressive feed speed will get you through the cut so that you can true it up again, if need be. In this case, I have a shim shingle that I keep on my saw that can quickly be inserted into the kerf if the need arises. I also use it as a push stick when I am ripping thin stock. The sharp edge will form to the corner and allows you to keep your eyes on the piece and the blade.

            P.S.- I use Freud blades almost exclusively. I really like the 44 and 60 tooth HI-ATB blades. With a properly tuned saw and careful cutting, I get an edge straight and sharp enough to joint to another board for glue-up panels. I do not have a stabilizer, although I am going to get one for both my TS2400 and TS3650. It just seems to me that it can't hurt!
            I do not use the splitter either BUT I use featherboards holding the piece down and holding it against the fence, huge difference especially when cutting alone. Another thing I did was I put the Wixey digital scale on my fence, this thing is great for quick cuts and repetitive cuts.
            Carpenters make the prettiest firewood

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