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  • Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

    I picked up a TS2400 last night during HD's incredible sale, and am wondering what blades users are replacing the stock blade with. I need to rip some 3/4" oak flooring (promised my wife I'd install hardwood flooring); I realize that the cuts will be under the base molding, but I still want them clean. I'll also be building some bookcases, and basement cabinets for my planned workshop. With the money saved from the HD sale, I can afford a Forrest WWII 40T, but is that the best blade for the 2400? I don't mind changing blades if necessary, so dedicated rip and crosscut blades are an option.

    Also, is there an issue with kerf and the splitter? I've read of instances with other saws where a splitter/riving knife was too thick for a thin kerf blade (the workpiece would jam on the splitter), or too thin for a wide kerf (splitter too thin to prevent kickback). Any known issues with the 2400? This is my first TS; while I've learned a lot lurking on this forum, I still have a lot to learn.

    Any info appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

    As with other portable type table saws you'll want to stick to thin kerf blades. A full kerf will easily bog it down or stall it unless its for some crosscutting. No problems with the splitter on TK blades that I've ever experienced on mine. Freud also makes a good thin kerf combo blade, the LU83R which works great on this saw and is relatively affordable.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

      I'd recommend the Ridge Carbide TS2000. It's on par with the WWII blade. But IMO it has more carbide (it's seriously thick). Currently on sale, too.

      Rip cuts cleanly and easily. Cross cuts are smooth as silk. I love it!

      http://www.woodpeck.com/ts2000blade.html

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

        I've had my 2400 TS for a couple of years or more. I'm using 3 different blades with it. A Dewalt thin kerf blade (combination, 60 tooth) and 2 Freud full kerf blades (combination 50 tooth & glueline rip 30 tooth). I've had no problems using the full kerf blades with red oak 2" thick and resawing 3-1/2" fir (2 passes). Of course the feed rate needs to be adjusted to the cut's requirements, but it has never gotten to the point of either burning or bogging. I'm quite happy with my choice of the Freud full kerf blades for the 2400 TS.

        I'm also using a 6" dado set. No problems up 3/4 wide and 3/8 deep.

        I've read somewhere that the difference in power requirement between thin and full kerf isn't all that great. The number of teeth and feed rate are a greater determiner of the amount of power required. As you can see I'm using mostly fine finish type blades, all with kick back limiting design, which really limits how deep a cut each tooth can take.

        IMO for fine work full kerf blades are great on the 2400 TS. Perhaps if you're trying to really hog out the cuts with non kick back limiting blades the answer may be different.
        Dick

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        • #5
          Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

          Thanks.

          The Forrest WWII thin-kerf is also on sale at Amazon for the same price as the Ridge - but the Freud is half the price of either. I'm willing to spend the cash for the Forrest or Ridge (I'd rather spend once and get it right), but the Freud's price has me interested.

          Is a blade dampener necessary with any of these blades?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

            Dick - thanks. What determines a kick-back limiting blade? I've been researching blades for a while (way before I bought the TS), and haven't found much info. I'd much prefer to mount a kick back limiting blade, even it it means a small sacrifice in cut quality.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

              As long as you buy good quality blades, a TK will work fine without a stiffener...save your money on that item. Most manufacturers will suggest a TK for saws under 3hp, but either should as long as the splitter is compatable. As a matter of simple physics, the TK's take ~ 25% narrower bite (3/32" vs 1/8"...small in inches, large as a percentage), which ultimately puts less strain on the motor, which helps the motor last longer, gives more flexibility with the feedrate and allows you to cut thicker woods without burning or bogging.

              Which to get really depends alot on what you cut, and possibly the deal you run into. The TS2000 or WWII are both terrific general purpose blades, as is the Infinity Combomax Lite. If you cut fairly thick material frequently but need to maintain clean cut quality, check out the 30T WWII TK...that one blows my mind....it feeds effortlessly and cuts about as cleanly as the 40T version...love it! I'm also very fond of the Freud LU88R010 for materials up to ~ 1-1/2"....it actually cuts a tad cleaner than any of the 40 or 50T general purp blades mentioned, does a better job in sheet goods, plus it's on sale for $36 shipped, making it an unbeatable deal IMHO. You may also want to add a good 24T TK ripper for bulk ripping and really thick stock....the LU87R010 is a good buy at ~ $27 shipped.

              You may also want to check out Holbren.com for some of their Amana deals. No experience with them yet, but the reputation is good and the prices are attractive with free shipping.

              blade comparison

              It's best to match your blade to the splitter, but as long as the splitter isn't thicker than the blade, it'll work fine.

              .
              Last edited by hewood; 11-24-2007, 09:30 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                hewood - thanks. I read your blade comparison, and started thinking about my planned (and possible) projects. I think multiple blades will serve better. If I'm remembering everything, I need blades that'll rip up to 1" plywood and hardwood ("4/4", if I've got that term right), and crosscut up to 1" plywood and up to 6/4 hardwood (anything that won't fit thru my SCMS). I've got hardwood flooring to rip, stair treads to replace with oak (another promise to my wife), and a bunch of cabinets to build. Sounds like the WWII 30T TK and the Freud LU88 might make a good combination.

                Thoughts?

                I've got to mic the splitter - there are no specs in the Ridgid documentation.

                BTW - Excellent comparison article - despite the fact that some of it was a little beyond me at this point...
                Last edited by JoeC; 11-24-2007, 10:38 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                  Originally posted by JoeC View Post
                  hewood - thanks. I read your blade comparison, and started thinking about my planned (and possible) projects. I think multiple blades will serve better. If I'm remembering everything, I need blades that'll rip up to 1" plywood and hardwood ("4/4", if I've got that term right), and crosscut up to 1" plywood and up to 6/4 hardwood (anything that won't fit thru my SCMS). I've got hardwood flooring to rip, stair treads to replace with oak (another promise to my wife), and a bunch of cabinets to build. Sounds like the WWII 30T TK and the Freud LU88 might make a good combination.

                  Thoughts?

                  I've got to mic the splitter - there are no specs in the Ridgid documentation.

                  BTW - Excellent comparison article - despite the fact that some of it was a little beyond me at this point...
                  It's hard for me to imagine not being happy with those two blades. They're both incredibly versatile, but each has strengths at opposite ends of the thickness spectrum where the other does not. The 30T WWII should cut cleanly for most cuts and is able to handle materials to close to 3" if need be, so it'll tackle many tasks of a bulk ripper with the benefit of a better cut. The LU88 will cut very cleanly for most cuts and can be left in place even for ripping up to ~ 6/4". Each blade will offer better performance for certain applications, but each will also handle most general applications well enough that you won't have to knock yourself out changing blades. The combination of blades will also help each one stay sharp longer.

                  Amazon's got two promo's going and they offer both those blades:
                  - 20% off most saw blades..."BLDPROMO" code at checkout
                  - another 20% off with the purchase of a qualifying tool (some tools as low as $15). You can basically get an $19 tool for free with the 30T WWII. Or something like the Denali 3.6v Li-Ion driver for an additional $5.

                  If you're not familiar with how the deals work, it'd go something like this. Put the 30T WWII and a qualifying tool in your cart. Go to checkout, choose free supersaver shipping, type "BLDPROMO" in the discount code box.

                  example:
                  Items: $117.89 (30T WWII @ ~$93 and a Denali 3.6v for ~ $24)
                  Shipping & Handling: $7.50
                  Super Saver Discount: -$7.50
                  Promotion Applied: -$18.58 (20% BLDPROMO)
                  Promotion Applied: -$18.58 (20% tool promo)

                  Total Before Tax: $80.73
                  Estimated Tax: $0.00
                  Order Total: $80.73

                  Proceed to complete that order, then order the LU88 separately with just the BLDPROMO...the tool discount would only come to $9 for this blade so I'd skip it unless you need or want another tool out of the deal.

                  Items: $44.99 (LU88)
                  Shipping & Handling: $5.90
                  Super Saver Discount: -$5.90
                  Promotion Applied: -$9.00 (20% BLDPROMO)

                  Total Before Tax: $35.99
                  Estimated Tax: $0.00
                  Order Total: $35.99

                  Both blades and a tool for as low as $110 to your door depending on the tool if you even want that deal.
                  Last edited by hewood; 11-25-2007, 12:06 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                    I'm playing with Amazon right now; I've got a Scheppach sharpener in my cart now, and I'm trying to finagle the best deal on the 2 blades. Still gotta check the splitter width prior to finalizing the order, though.

                    Don't need another driver - even if it's free... I've got enough of those hanging around, thank you very much...

                    Sincere thanks for all the advice; it is appreciated.
                    Last edited by JoeC; 11-25-2007, 02:30 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                      FYI:

                      The splitter thickness on my TS2400 is between 0.073" and 0.075" (measured at blade and back edges); looks like any standard TK blade will fit.

                      Time to go shopping...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                        As long as you buy good quality blades, a TK will work fine without a stiffener...save your money on that item.
                        I have to respectfully disagree with this, at least to some degree. As long as the stabilizer does not interfere with the depth of the cut, there is no reason not to use one. That being said, some blades can benefit more than others. It seems that blades that don't have an angle ground into the top of the teeth don't move as much. So, true ripping blades (FT) and triple chip (TC) may not need one, but it certainly doesn't hurt anything. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) blades, on the other hand, have more of a tendancy to wobble back and forth. The side to side load from the angle of the teeth can start what amounts to a vibration, since this is all happening very fast. This is exaggerated by excesive feed speed, but can happen at normal feed rates. High angle ATB (HATB) can make this even worse.
                        Of course the sharper the blade is, the less of this you should see. As the blade dulls though, it can get worse. I use one whenever possible....even on my 8.5" DeWalt sliding miter saw.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                          Originally posted by LONGHAIR View Post
                          I have to respectfully disagree with this, at least to some degree. As long as the stabilizer does not interfere with the depth of the cut, there is no reason not to use one. That being said, some blades can benefit more than others. It seems that blades that don't have an angle ground into the top of the teeth don't move as much. So, true ripping blades (FT) and triple chip (TC) may not need one, but it certainly doesn't hurt anything. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) blades, on the other hand, have more of a tendancy to wobble back and forth. The side to side load from the angle of the teeth can start what amounts to a vibration, since this is all happening very fast. This is exaggerated by excesive feed speed, but can happen at normal feed rates. High angle ATB (HATB) can make this even worse.
                          Of course the sharper the blade is, the less of this you should see. As the blade dulls though, it can get worse. I use one whenever possible....even on my 8.5" DeWalt sliding miter saw.
                          I've used over 25 TK's and have never found benefit from using a stiffener, and have read from many others who've had similar experiences....some find benefit, but it seems most don't. If you've got one already, then I agree there's no harm in using it other than loss of depth, but I don't recommend purchasing one. IMO, buying one benefits the seller more than the buyer unless you've got a saw with some arbor vibration, poor quality blade, or defective blade. Most tests find the TK's to cut comparably to full kerfs, and there are even some tests that find the TK's can actually leave a cleaner cut than a comparable full kerf b/c of their narrower bite. (See Wood's current blade comparison, and American WWer's article in #118)

                          I appreciate the respectfulness of your disagreement. However, I'm at a loss to understand how the tooth grind can cause enough lateral pressure to increase vibration in any amount remotely detectable considering the speeds, distances, angles, body mass, and stiffness involved. ATB grinds are generally considered to be cleaner cutting than FTGs and TCGs, and Hi-ATB's are considered the cleanest cutting of all due to the sheering action of the cut. That wouldn't be true if there was vibration introduced by those grinds. There are typically in the range of 3-7 teeth buried in the wood at any given time if the blade was chosen correctly for the task (ATB grinds tend to be in the higher tooth count region). The alternate bevels should essentially balance out...if they didn't alternate, I could see there being some remote chance of causing lateral pressure, but not in an alternating setting, and not in any remotely significant amounts. The quality of the steel, balance of the blade, combined with the arbor runout of the saw, the grain of the wood itself in some cases , and even excessive heat are the heavy weight contributors to blade instability. Perhaps I'm wrong, but I don't see tooth grind being a detectable factor.
                          Last edited by hewood; 11-25-2007, 11:49 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                            A kick back limiting blade has a radial bump following the tooth and before the next gullet that limits how far the blade can advance. Router bits use a similar type of design to also limit kick back potential. I have to admit that I don't know if these features are effective on a saw blade as the only blades I have without them are the OEM baldes that came with the 2400 TS and my miter saw, and I hardly ever use those blades. I became "educated" about this feature on the Freud wed site (I think it was Freud's).

                            When I bought the Freud blades I was looking to step up to high quality blades and some suggestions on this forum and elsewhere, plus the cost difference between them and Forrest lead me to Freud. I'm very happy with these blades, but I'm sure you would find any of the highly rated (rated by these forum members) blades to be great additions to your arsenal.

                            I've not had any problem using my Dewalt thin kerf blade with the 2400 TS's splitter. I use that blade to set up and check the splitter so I can change between blades without worry about adjusting the splitter. With the thin kerf blade there isn't nearly as much tolerance in the set up as with a full kerf blade, but not a difficult set up.
                            Dick

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                            • #15
                              Re: Best combo blade/kerf for TS2400?

                              Longhair/Hewood:

                              I've got a Forrest 5" dampener that I purchased with a Chopmaster (bought as a package deal thru Amazon - never mind the fact that Forrest states on their website that the dampeners are not to be used with miter/chop saws...).

                              Makes you wonder what the employees at Amazon are smoking, sometimes...

                              Anyway, I've got a dampener that I can try out, at least for thin stock.

                              Still trying to decide if the WWII 30T TK or 40T TK would be the better option - the Dec/Jan issue of Wood rated the 40T TK top blade...and it's on sale thru Amazon for $89.99. Maybe get the LU88, WWII 40T, and a Freud 24T rip... I really can't afford three blades right now, but I need options that will give the smoothest cuts without burning/bogging.

                              Dick:

                              Thanks for the info.

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