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  • Pipe Clamps

    Though I really wanted K-body clamps, just couldn't justify $40.00 a piece. So I picked up some 3/4" pipe clamps at HF for $4.00 each! My question is should I use black or galvanized pipe? Or does it even matter? My thought was that the galvanized would be more resistant to rust. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    Galvanized would be more rust resistant and the black finish of the steel pipe might rub off on your work, but either way, make sure you clean any and all oil off the pipe and throw a coat of wax on it to keep glue from sticking to it. I have no idea of the price difference between black and galvanized.
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      Use black pipe----remember, that one end has a spring cam that pushes against the surface of the pipe, so the pipe is part of the system----some have tried ridgid wall conduit---too slippery----galvanized pipe's surface is too rough and the cam's grip wouldn't be even, let alone slide the tail up and down the pipe easily.

      You can try to get some black pipe at a salvage yard, but it's not all that expensive retail, or if you do a lot of business with a particular plumber, see if he can get you a deal. Have fun.
      Dave

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      • #4
        I needed some clamps, but when i was picking them up, HD only had 3 of the length in the black, so i picked up one galvanized. I really cannot tell the difference btween them.

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        • #5
          I remeber reading somewhere that galvanized is softer...in any case I used black pipe from HD for very cheap. the difference between 10' and 5' pipelenghts was just $2, so I got a 10' and asked them to cut it and thread it for free! (You'll have to find the right guy in HD at a slow period, otherwise they wont' do it!)

          Cheers,
          Subbu

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          • #6
            Lorax, you mentioned waxing the pipes to prevent glue from sticking. That sounds like a swell idea, and one I should employ on my Bessey's. What kind of a wax do you use?

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            • #7
              Johnsons Paste Wax. The same stuff a lot of us use on our table saw tops, planer tables, jointer tables, etc. etc. Works great on Bessys and Jorgys too. [img]smile.gif[/img] [img]smile.gif[/img]
              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #8
                nice thing about pipe clamps is if you get some unions for the pipe you can make up clamps almost unlimited in lingth . i actually have mostly shortys and screw em together if i need more bill

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                • #9
                  These new ones from Irwin look pretty sweet, eliminates the need for a threaded pipe.

                  Woodslayer

                  http://www.irwin.com/irwin/consumer/...Type=BM1000005

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                  • #10
                    The "documentation" for most pipe clamps say to use black pipe, and that would have been my first choice too. HD and Lowes sells both in a variety of lengths and pre-threaded. But where I live there's so much potential for rusting I decided in the end to use galvanized pipe. So far I haven't had any problems with slippage. My only complaint concerns the clamps themselves... I wish the jaws were a little larger.

                    I wish I'd seen the tip on unions sooner... would have saved me getting some 8' lengths! aargh.

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                    • #11
                      heinsite,
                      Harbor Freight sells a style of their Pittsburgh pipe clamps that have deeper jaws. I've heard some people like them for lighter duty clamping. They are always going on sale for just a few bucks. You could get a couple and judge for yourself. I just reread your post and see that you want larger jaws, not deeper. Sorry bout that. I guess the coffee hasn't kicked in yet. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                      Joining pipes with unions is OK, but I think couplings are easier (and a lot cheaper).

                      [ 01-26-2004, 07:22 AM: Message edited by: Lorax ]
                      Lorax
                      "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                      • #12
                        I've found that any discussion regarding gal. versus black pipe is similar to sharpening methods: It's likely to start a fight. I had been told to only use black pipe dispite it's tendancy to stain the wood and rust. However, some reliable sources (ex. Gary Rogowski--makes furn. and runs a woodworkings school in the northwest, has a few books and videos) uses galvinized pipe. He also cautions that some gal. pipe's diameter is slightly less than other gal. pipe and the larger dia. is the only one that works. I use black pipe and cover it with newspaper when clamping panels, but get stains on vertical surfaces.

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                        • #13
                          I use electrical rigid conduit (not thin wall). It's smoother than galvanized water pipe. It comes in 10 ft lenght but you can have it cut and threaded no charge at HD.

                          [ 01-26-2004, 09:51 AM: Message edited by: NUGGY ]

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                          • #14
                            WOW...they still sell pipe clamps? I have about 2k in K-Bodys. Will add another 2K before all said and done. PC's, IMO, are a thing of the past.

                            Ok, kick me now, I deserve it.
                            John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                            • #15
                              I have about 25 pipe clamps and have always used black pipe. To keep black marks off of your work buy you some pvc pipe and cut then in 2 inch increments. Cut a slit length wise and slide them over the black pipe. This will keep the wood from contacting the pipe and your black streak mark problem will be history.
                              Grainraiser
                              Reggie

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