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  • Blade suggestions for a new 2400 owner

    Just purchased the 2400 with/portable stand. Know basic woodworking concepts & principles from woodworking class 15 years ago (pre high school). Want to get more serious about woodworking.

    My first project is an aquarium stand for a 500+ lb (45G) aquarium. I've seen several in the stores made from 1x2's. I'll be using 2x4's for the main structure/frame (pine).

    One thing I've heard from others is to invest in replacing the "stock" blade with a better blade.

    The wood I plan on cutting will be combination of light colored hardwoods (maple, birch, etc) and also more common woods like pine/redwood.

    Any suggestions on a good, reasonably priced blade(s)? I did a search on this forum and read a bit about a couple of blade brands/types, but couldn't glean a clear (ok semi-clear) answer to this question from my reading.

    How much do they typically run now-a-days? Any good online sources?
    Any suggested options (w/ order of purchase priority) for this saw?

    TIA

    Bubba

  • #2
    I am new to woodworking also and I didn't want to pay the $100.00 to $150.00 for a really good blade yet, so I purchased a Freud Diablo and it cuts like butter. It cost about $50.00 at your HD store.
    Semper Fi <BR>Chuck<BR>USMC 66-70

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    • #3
      Okay... did a bit more research and I understand more but then am also further confussed.

      I'll be doing both cross cuts as well as ripping.

      Number of Teeth
      I see that the number of teeth has a lot to do with the type of application. Other than carbide tips, any suggestions (# of teeth, etc.) based on my needs above?

      Any questions to help me elaborate further?

      $50 Freud Diablo
      Chuck, do you remember which one that was? All I saw (online) were a number that were in the $10-50 range.

      Any additional help/advice you can offer would be greatly appreciated.

      Thanks!

      Comment


      • #4
        How does a guy named Bubba end up in California, anyway?

        I'm a no-compromise woodworker. When I want a particular job done, I prefer it be done right.

        There isn't a blade made that will make both ripcuts and crosscuts, and be the best. Therefore, my choice is to use separate blades. For a decent pair you can get locally, Freud "TK" series work well. A ripping blade is a 24 tooth, and crosscut has 80 teeth. The pair will probably run a little shy of $75.

        There are better models if you don't mind stepping into a higher price bracket. "Better" generally gets you a bit better cut, and a much longer life. The TKs are somewhat disposable.

        This next comment isn't necessarily for you (those who it is aimed at know who they are ): Yes, I have tried Forrest Woodworker II blades, in both 30 and 40 tooth. Don't like 'em, they don't rip as well as a ripping blade, nor crosscut as well as a crosscut.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Hi Dave,

          Yeah, I'm Bubba the beach bum surfer

          Seriously, I talk with a bit of a southern accent sometimes and the name just kinda grew on me.

          Regarding blades, I purchased at 60 tooth Freud Diablo (couldn't find the 80t unit you spoke of) and will use the combination blade that comes with it for cross cuts for now..

          I did find Saturday that I was unable to get the blade off using the wrenches supplied with the unit. Found out this morning when I spoke with Ridgid, that the two wrenches aren't supposed to be the same, and on my unit (2400) they are. I'll be getting a new wrench by wednesday so I'll be able to change my blades. Kind of a bummer since it now delays my project by a couple of days.

          I've already done all the cross cut's for the project that I can, so it's just wait time now.

          BB

          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave Arbuckle:
          How does a guy named Bubba end up in California, anyway?

          I'm a no-compromise woodworker. When I want a particular job done, I prefer it be done right.

          There isn't a blade made that will make both ripcuts and crosscuts, and be the best. Therefore, my choice is to use separate blades. For a decent pair you can get locally, Freud "TK" series work well. A ripping blade is a 24 tooth, and crosscut has 80 teeth. The pair will probably run a little shy of $75.
          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

          Comment


          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Bubba Blue:
            I did find Saturday that I was unable to get the blade off using the wrenches supplied with the unit. Found out this morning when I spoke with Ridgid, that the two wrenches aren't supposed to be the same, and on my unit (2400) they are.
            <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

            Bubba,

            As long as you can get a wrench onto the arbor nut you can still remove the blade. Simply lay a piece of scrap stock across the openning in front of the blade and let the teeth dig into it. If you have to raise the blade all the way up. This is how the blades are changed on most all contractor and cabinet saws.

            Jake

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            • #7
              My current tool collection does not include a wrench big enough to handle the size nut in there. I'm checking if some of my buddies can help me out with a bigger wrench, but most are beach bums .

              I'm looking at getting a bigger adjustable wrench to use today.

              Thanks.

              Comment


              • #8
                I would recommend a combination wrench over an adjustable. Easier on the nut. Unfortunately, the manual doesn't list the size of the nut. Bet Customer Service could tell you.

                Dave
                (1 1/16" on TS2424 )

                Comment


                • #9
                  <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave Arbuckle:
                  (1 1/16" on TS2424 )<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                  You got it Dave. Its the same nut on the TS2400 and the 2424

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                  • #10
                    For table saw blades I would use Forrest or Jesada Blades. They give very smooth cut with blade stablers.
                    Andy B.

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