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  • Blades???

    Hey ya'll,

    I just ordered my ts3650 and was wondering what blades you would consider to be the best for rip/crosscut. I already bought/won a Freud dd208 stack dado($73.00 on ebay). The first job I'll be using this saw for is ripping 2x spruce to make trim. I've been using an old Makita portable saw w/ an 8 1/4" blade and cannot wait to try this baby out.

  • #2
    Re: Blades???

    Freud blades constantly get rated among the best. Their rip blade would be perfect for your project. My favorite blade so far is the Forrest Woodworker II. Although I just ruined one by not checking this old barnwood for hidden nails!!! Stupid me got in a rush and didn't change the blade to my old stock blade before ripping the piece. Although the WWII went right through that old hard Oak just fine...including the nail...it would've been better to have not wasted that blade! You can't go wrong with Freud, though.

    Here's a link to one particular thread...
    http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1771



    Welcome to the forums, by the way! I just realized this is your first post. Hope you hang out and show us some of your projects.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Blades???

      If you're willing to change blades frequently then the best route to go would be to use a dedicated rip blade and a dedicated crosscut blade. If constantly changing blades is not what you enjoy doing then a good quality general purpose or combination blade is the way to go. Some recommendations would be; Rip Blades: Freud LU87R010 Thin Kerf, Freud LU72R010 Full Kerf, Freud LU74R010 Almost Full Kerf(For Stock Up To 1" Thick), Crosscut Blades: Freud LU88R010 Thin Kerf, Freud LU73M010 Full Kerf, Freud LU85R010 Full Kerf Combination Blades: Freud LU84R011 Full Kerf, Freud LU84R010 Thin Kerf General Purpose Blades: Freud P410 Full Kerf , Forrest Woodworker II Full and Thin Kerf , Ridge Carbide TS21040 Full Kerf , Ridge Carbide TS21040TK Thin Kerf
      Last edited by BadgerDave; 11-29-2007, 08:40 PM.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: Blades???

        Anybody try out the Diablo blades?

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        • #5
          Re: Blades???

          Thanks for the info. I'll start searching around the net for best prices today. BTW, what difference does "kerf" make other than the amount of material the you are removing from you're stock?

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          • #6
            Re: Blades???

            Originally posted by GilBeQuick View Post
            Anybody try out the Diablo blades?
            Any Freud blades that I've tried have given good results, but I lean heavily toward the Industrial series whenever possible. I'd expect the best long term performance from the Industrial or Premier series. The Diablo and Avanti lines are made to similar standards, but are typically not sold at the some retail outlets and are aimed at different markets. The Diablo is aimed more at the construction market and the Avanti at the DIYers. The Industrial line is a step up the ladder...tighter tolerances, finer edge, larger teeth, and far larger selection for specific tasks...they tend to market them to the more demanding woodworking and professional market. The Industrial line tends to have a higher retail price, but they go on sale often at places like Amazon for around the same price as the Diablo or Avanti, which typically makes the Industrial line a better value IMO, if you can wait for a sale to buy. Freud also has an elite "Premier" line that currently includes only the new P410 Fusion AFAIK.

            Freud makes the Ridgid Titanium line too. They don't give up their trade secrets readily, but based on tooth size, selection, design, and pricing, it appears to me that they're made comparably to the Diablo and Avanti lines. They don't go on sale often, so the Industrial line still holds the value advantage over this line as well IMO.

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            • #7
              Re: Blades???

              Originally posted by captainshawn View Post
              Thanks for the info. I'll start searching around the net for best prices today. BTW, what difference does "kerf" make other than the amount of material the you are removing from you're stock?
              Kerf is the width of the cut the blade takes. There are no set industry standards for kerf width, but most tend to fall into a fairly consistent range. Thin kerf (TK) is typically ~ 3/32" (0.090 to 0.100"), full kerf tends to be ~ 1/8", (0.125") but can also go upwards of 0.135 and 0.145 for some. There are a few that fall into a "mid-kerf" range of ~ 0.110 to 0.118". The differences appear to be small in terms of inches, but as a relative percentage, a full kerf blade removes 33% more wood than a thin kerf and requires more effort from the saw's motor as a result. Most manufacturers recommend a TK for saw's under 3hp (most jobsite, contractor saws, and hybrids).

              The downside of the TK's is that they are more prone to deflection or vibration issues. However, if you avoid the cheaper blades and stick with high quality, the odds are excellent that you'll never encounter a deflection issue. The upside is that the motor will be less taxed with a good TK and you'll be able to cut thicker materials without bogging or burning. I've had alot of excellent results from ~ 25 different high quality TK's, so I tend to use them and recommend them, but the full kerf blades will work also but won't plow through the thicker woods as easily.

              There's alot of variables and information about choosing the best blade for any given task, and it ultimately boils down to what your cutting and your preferences. There are two main philosophies, and many of us use a blend of the two.

              Theory 1: The best possible performance comes from using a task specific blade for each application. (Ie: 80T crosscut blade for fine crosscuts, 24T ripping blade for thick/bulk ripping jobs). This requires owning at least two blades and requires frequent blade changing for each task. Two blades costs a bit more, but rotation of blades tends to give a little better edge life between sharpenings. The downside is that a sharpening will cost more for two blades when the time comes.

              Theory 2: Choose a versatile "general purpose" or "combination" blade for most tasks. A high quality general purp blade will do a very good job in most tasks, so you don't need to own multiple blades and don't need to change blades frequently between tasks. The surveys I've seen suggest that ~ 75% of amateurs choose this route over task specific blades.

              Many of us, myself included, tend to use a 40T or 50T general purpose or combo blade for most tasks, but are also likely to pull out a 24T ripper for ripping alot of thick stock, which is ultimately easier on the motor and spares my expensive GP blade from the bull work. I own a couple of 80T fine finish blades too but rarely use them....again it really boils down to preference and the task at hand. A good 40T or 50T blade like a Forrest WWII, Infinity Super General, Infinity Combomax, Ridge Carbide TS2000, Tenryu Gold Medal, or Freud P410 Fusion will do a pretty impressive job on a wide range of cuts. You'll easily get glueable joints right off the saw with any of these blades when used on a proper tuned saw. If all other quality and design variables of a given blade are equal, the 80T crosscut blades leave a cleaner cut, but offer little in the way of versatility...they inherently have a slower feedrate which leads to more of a tendency to burn, so you're pretty much restricted to crosscuts only or fairly thin material with them. If you do alot of fine plywood or veneers, a good 80T blade is a good choice, if not, it may not be a blade you need to purchase. There are also a couple of blades outside of the 40-50 tooth range that I love and use for general purpose work...the Forrest WWII 30 tooth, and the Freud LU88 60T....both offer terrific versatility and excellent performance in slightly different material thickness ranges...the 30T WWII excels in thicker materials up to 3" offering a very good feedrate while mainting a good cut, and the LU88 offers a decent feedrate up to 6/4" and has an excellent cut....these two in combination can cover all but the most extreme ranges while mainting excellent cut quality "across the board" . ( I guess these two are best described as a ripper with a great cut and crosscut capability, and a crosscut blade with good ripping ability)

              Don't cheap out...an inexpensive blade like an 80T Skil, B&D Piranha, Hitachi, or Irwin Marathon isn't likely to cut as cleanly as a 40T Forrest or Infinity and gives up the versatility of the lower tooth count....quality makes a big difference and pays off in the long run. There are however some excellent values with sales on the Freud Industrial line like those Badger Dave mentioned (20% at Amazon right now on all blades including CMT and Forrest). Also, Holbren is currently offering the Tenryu RS25540 40T "Rapid Cut" for ~ $30 shipped. He is also offering the Amana line and some of the Ridge Carbide blades at great prices and free shipping. It's very possible to buy a good GP or combo blade in the $30-$40 range if you do a little investigating.

              Here's a chart of blades I've used along with some comparative comments, if you're interested.
              Last edited by hewood; 11-30-2007, 11:23 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: Blades???

                I like the Diablos.
                One other comment I went to buy the Diablo 80t at HD and they didnt have so I settled for a Ridgid 80t instead.Wish I hadnt. It seems to sound tinny when cutting wood sometimes. Maybe weak metal. It also gummed up worse than the Diablo. Plus it cost $50.

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                • #9
                  Re: Blades???

                  Originally posted by GilBeQuick View Post
                  Anybody try out the Diablo blades?
                  The Diablo line is about an in between to the Avanti and Industrial series. If you take a look at the specs they are mostly identical to the Avanti blades. The main difference is the Diablo has anti-vibration grooves which the Avanti's don't have. The Avanti series is incredibly loud and tends to deflect easily as a result. I've tried a few Avanti's and if the cut gets too thick, the edge of the workpiece towards the outside edge of the blade will be off by about 1/32".

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                  • #10
                    Re: Blades???

                    Alright, I ordered the LU87R010 and LU88R010. Unfotunatly the saw will not arrive until the 5th. and even then I don't get off the boat until the 12th. Hurry up and wait I guess. Thanks for the help...

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