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Just got TP1300, any tips?

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  • Just got TP1300, any tips?

    As part of my introduction to woodworking I treated myself to a new planer. Being that I am new to this hobby I never used one before and could use any advice. I will be sure to read the manual but some real world tips and suggestions can be invaluable.

    Something else I am wondering about is the need for a jointer. Other than wanting one it will be some time before I can get a decent one. For now I will be using a 40+ year old Dunlop 4 inch bench top jointer I got from my father-in-law (which belonged to his father). The Dunlop works but I have no idea how well it works. My neighbor gave me 14 boards of cherry about an inch thick ranging in widths of 4" to 14". Does wood have to be run through a jointer before the planer? Cant you run the wood through the planer, flip, and repeat until you get down to the desired thickness? Being only a 4" inch jointer seems to be a bit of handicap as I will have to rip all the boards down (assuming it has to go through the jointer first). Like I mentioned above, I am very new to this hobby and dont really know much about jointers and planer and when you have to use one and/or the other.

  • #2
    Re: Just got TP1300, any tips?

    Never plane to much off of one face at a time. The board will begin to bow
    in the direction of the face being planed.

    NEVER plane a board that is to short. It can kick throw the board back at
    you into your fingers that are pushing the board.
    Don't feed your fingers into the planer knives!
    VivicitaHome emergency breakdown services at Homeserve

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Just got TP1300, any tips?

      Originally posted by Pez View Post
      As part of my introduction to woodworking I treated myself to a new planer. Being that I am new to this hobby I never used one before and could use any advice. I will be sure to read the manual but some real world tips and suggestions can be invaluable.

      Something else I am wondering about is the need for a jointer. Other than wanting one it will be some time before I can get a decent one. For now I will be using a 40+ year old Dunlop 4 inch bench top jointer I got from my father-in-law (which belonged to his father). The Dunlop works but I have no idea how well it works. My neighbor gave me 14 boards of cherry about an inch thick ranging in widths of 4" to 14". Does wood have to be run through a jointer before the planer? Cant you run the wood through the planer, flip, and repeat until you get down to the desired thickness? Being only a 4" inch jointer seems to be a bit of handicap as I will have to rip all the boards down (assuming it has to go through the jointer first). Like I mentioned above, I am very new to this hobby and dont really know much about jointers and planer and when you have to use one and/or the other.
      First off, your neighbor rocks. 14" wide cherry is a heckuva nice thing to give away. Make sure you make them a nice item out of some of that cherry.

      Second, congrats! The TP1300 is a great planer and I think many of the forums folks might agree that it's one of Ridgid's best machines.

      To answer your question: "Cant you run the wood through the planer, flip, and repeat until you get down to the desired thickness?"
      > Yes, you *could* and what you would have is two surfaces, parallel to eachother (while in the planer) and of a certain thickness. BUT, it would not necessarily be a usable piece of stock. You could wind up with a piece with bowing or cupping still present! The job of the jointer is to make one flat surface, period. This normally shaves off material that is cupped or bowed, so you *remove* such defects. The job of the planer is to make a flat surface parallel to the other side. The rollers of the planer push the board flat as it passes the blades, but once its out the wood resumes its warped shape.

      Do some searching online about surfacing and prepping rough lumber. Here's a good start for ya: http://www.cuttingedgetools.com/DRWOOD.Jointers.html

      Yes, a jointer and planer combo is 'best' if you want to use rough (cheap!) lumber. But you can face a board using just your planer (copied from HERE
      "Quick and dirty description of the process: Take a flat piece of 3/4 plywood, set the board on top of the plywood, shim between the board and plywood where needed to keep the board from moving/rocking as you pass it through the planer. Once that side is flat then remove the board from the sled and plane the other side as you normally would."

      Tips for the planer:
      - Make sure you adjust the in and outfeed tables so you reduce / eliminate snipe.
      - ALWAYS use a dust collection system. A shop vac will do the job, but just barely (I know this from experience). A 4" hookup can definitely keep up.
      - ALWAYS wear ear protection. Between the planer, which is a loud machine and the dust collection, it's a noisy process.
      - In addition to using the planer's thickness scale, calipers will help you achieve repeatable results.
      - Periodically clean off the rollers. Use a thick nylon bristled brush or something. Do NOT do this while it's running! Otherwise the chips stuck to the rollers can put little "dents" in your workpiece.
      - Lubricate the table. Boeshield works well.. or whatever your lube of choice is for your other top surfaces.
      - IF you use rough or recycled lumber, get a metal detector wand. A nail or staple will ruin your blades.

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      • #4
        Re: Just got TP1300, any tips?

        I have owned a TP1300LS for a couple of years and used it fairly heavily. It has met or exceeded my every expectation.

        One thing I have noticed is that the rubber in-feed and out-feed rollers tend to get coated and glazed over, especially when planing resinous woods. When this happens, the wood will stall and not feed properly. I have found that cleaning the rollers with isopropyl alcohol and paper towels fixes that problem quickly. I have seen a lot of complaints about the TP1300 not feeding the lumber properly and in every case I know of, cleaning the rollers was the solution. It also helps to wax the bed as someone else already said.

        If you want to improve the convenience and accuracy of setting the thickness to non-standard dimensions - like 3/8" for example - invest in a Wixey digital thickness gauge. If installed and calibrated properly, it will allow you to set the thickness of cut to within just a few thousandths of an inch. I found the device to be very useful.

        If you experience a problem with one or both edges of the board coming out a little thinner than the rest ofthe board (snipe) adjust the outside edges of the infeed an outfeed table so that they are a little higher (~1/16") than the surface of the bed.

        These are a few things I can think of that you might find useful.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Just got TP1300, any tips?

          Thanks guys, much appreciated.

          Wood Junkie - When my neighbor gave me the wood I had no idea just how nice of a gesture that was. Like I said, I am very new to this and once I relaized what the wood would have cost I was shocked. And these are approx 10 foot boards.

          Here is the kicker - he uses it for firewood! And you should see how much he has, probably 200+ boards, all about 10 feet in length, all free! It came from a cabinet making place, thier wharehouse got flooded and they wrote all the wood off and re-couped the loss from the insurance company. He basically had free reign to take what he wanted before a salvage company came in to get the rest (about $750,000 worth of wood). When he realized I was getting into woodworking he offered me some of it. Had I known what a goldmine that was I would have taken a lot more. He has a huge pile sitting in his yard, exposed to all the elements ready to be cut down to size and burned. Sad.
          Last edited by Pez; 11-30-2007, 11:23 PM.

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