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  • Finding a Tabletop

    I'm calling upon the powers of this woodworking forum to help me find something i haven't had much luck with as of yet. I'm look to find a round table top of about 42" or 46" in diameter. I just need the table top, not the legs. Idealy it should be roughly 1 1/2" thick and very similar construction to a butcher block counter top picture below. The problem i'm having with all these tops i'm finding either online or my local unfinished furniture store the bottoms come with two support cleats for stability on the underside and my project will need to use both sides of this board. I also will need to buy about 10 of them if that matters at all.

    I'm not sure if BadgerDave or OrangeApron has any ideas for local places since my parents live in a similar area and can order them or pick them up. I've already tried the Rockler store and they have no idea where I could pick up such an animal. I know making one myself is an option but my dad and I don't have this much time to dedicate to this project but it may come down to it.

    So... anyone out there of any online resources or company that offers roughly what i'm looking for? Thanks for any help and I can provide more details if they are needed.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: Finding a Tabletop

    What if you got some butcher block counter top and glued it up into a square blank that you could cut to whatever diameter you needed using a bandsaw and/or a router.
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    • #3
      Re: Finding a Tabletop

      Try looking for a workbench top, if you need 10 table tops perhaps you could cut these to size
      This particular company makes maple and birch

      Here is one example of what I am referring too

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      • #4
        Re: Finding a Tabletop

        I would try going to a good local lumber yard and ask if they deal with products made by Bally Block Co. of Bally, Pennsylvania or Michigan Maple Block Co. of Petoskey, Michigan. Tell them you need to see their catalogs for butcher blocks.

        For kitchen use they come normally unfinished. For industrial work benches they would come finished and 1-3/4" think is normal. Normally they will be rectangle in shape but needing 10, I bet they could make square ones and then use a band saw to make them circular. Besides lumber yards check your yellow pages under Industrial Supply and Materials Handling. These will be more into the industrial products. They will most likely use 2 tops edge glued with pressure and heat to make up a 48 inch square. They that can be cut to a disc. Once cut then the finishing work starts. Trying to saw 1-3/4 rock maple on a home owner band saw doesn't come easy. You need a real production beast with a serious band in it.

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        • #5
          Re: Finding a Tabletop

          Thanks bob, wbrooks, and woussko. The countertop idea might just work. I'll have to look into it.

          I'm not sure if it matters or not but it doesn't have to be 'butcher's block' table but rather any solid non-plywood tabletop. I just said butcher's block because i wasn't sure how to describe it.

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          • #6
            Re: Finding a Tabletop

            Van Dyke's has them, although oddly, they come as 2 pieces...so you'd have to glue them together to form a circle:
            http://www.vandykes.com/product/02383507/

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            • #7
              Re: Finding a Tabletop

              I'd think they'd be easier and perhaps cheaper to ship that way, wouldn't they?

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              • #8
                Re: Finding a Tabletop

                Originally posted by jbateman View Post
                Van Dyke's has them, although oddly, they come as 2 pieces...so you'd have to glue them together to form a circle:
                http://www.vandykes.com/product/02383507/

                That's perfect; thanks. I ordered 3 to start me off.

                Another question for you guys since you were so much help before. I was going to either join these with dowels or biscuits. I'm not sure which is going to be a stronger joint. This will be used as a large game board that will lay flat on a table when in use but will be picked up, handled and moved to store it when not in use. I figure there will be a lot of stress on the joints and wanted to ask which would the best joinery method would be. Thanks again for all your help.

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                • #9
                  Re: Finding a Tabletop

                  Since it'll lay flat against another surface, you may want to think about using some flat pieces glued to one side, and rout out a mortise to receive them on the other. These would act like registration pieces when the table is in place. Since they're not glued together, the two halves would be able to separate making it easier to move and store them. You could make the non-glued side into an L-shaped (with the short part of the L facing up) bracket that would pull the halves together tight when it's in place. I hope that makes a bit of sense...my sketching skills on computer are horrible, and my verbal descriptions aren't that great either, I'm afraid.
                  I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Finding a Tabletop

                    I think you were planning on permanently joining the halves. If that is the case then the biscuits or dowels are really only to help align the sections during glue-up. The glue joint is actually stronger than the wood

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