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  • TS3650 Accessories

    hello, woodworkers of the world, I need a little help finding out where I can get the AC1040 8" Dado Insert and the AC1098 Dust Collector for my TS3650 table saw. I have checked around, and finding out that these two accessories are very hard to find. In the parts & accessories book that came with TS3650 are no longer carried by RIDGID. Any and all help and advice is greatly appreciated. Thanks much


    Keep the table saws running,
    And the saw dust flying,
    Something is getting made!

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 Accessories

    As far as getting those specific RIDGID accessories, Dust Collection Kit & Dado ZCI, you might find them on E-Bay but you'll probably end up paying 2 to 3 times more than they're worth as they are discontinued items.

    For the Dado ZCI, I'd be making my own if I were you.

    But if you don't feel like doing that, take a gander at these...

    Leecraft http://www.amazon.com/Leecraft-RG-1-.../dp/B0006FKJGY

    ~ or ~

    Peachtree Woodworking http://www.ptreeusa.com/zero_clearance.htm

    For Contractor Saw Dust Collection, look at this...

    http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=5140

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: TS3650 Accessories

      Ditto on the ZCI's. Make your own from MDF, scrap wood, or buy a pre-made blank. Check the above links or try Amazon or Rockler.

      For dust collection, search this forum. There are some really cool designs people made, mostly out of plywood and such.

      You're pretty much out of luck for Ridgid accessories unless you want to by used and/or e-bay but you will pay through the nose.

      Good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: TS3650 Accessories

        I bought some from peachtree, they work okay, but are not totally flat. the material is too soft.

        I have some very good inserts made out of MDF. Set my router up to rabbet the edges of 3/4 MDF so it fits perfectly without set screws (you can always go back and add them if you need to). A screw horizontally in the back to keep everything in place and a screw hole up front. The only caveat to using 3/4 material is that you will need to start the kerf with something other than a 10" blade as the blade doesn't drop below the table surface very much. I use my 6" dado blade to start the kerf and then finish it with the blade being used for that insert. works pretty well. I make them in batches so I have plenty lying around.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: TS3650 Accessories

          thanks, bigscore for the direction, advice, and links. I ordered a couple of blanks for ptreeusa.com

          thanks again

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: TS3650 Accessories

            thanks, northern wood, and rprice54 for the advice. I never made an insert before, I like to try my hand at it, so do I just trace out the insert using the installed insert as a templet and rabbet the edges of the 3/4 mdf.

            thanks for your time and direction

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TS3650 Accessories

              I trace it out using the factory insert. then cut it out within 1/16- 1/8th outside of the line using a scroll saw (jig saw, band saw). Then using a flush trim bit and the factory insert as a template, flush up the insert to the factory insert. make a couple while you're at it. I put a big hole near the back for a finger pull as well.

              Then, I set up a 1/2 rabbet bit and rabbeted all the way around. sneak up on the final depth to get an insert that is flush with or just below the table top. Near the front you may need to nibble away more material with your table saw as the area for the screw protrudes out a bit more. make a few while you have the router set up.

              I like to chamfer the edges a bit around the top to keep it from snagging, either with a plane, a chamfer bit, or a sanding block, like the factory insert.

              Then trace out the screw for the front and drill/countersink a hole big enough for the front screw. I put a horizontal screw in the back for good measure.

              I'll post some pics when I get a chance if you want.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TS3650 Accessories

                Great job, rprice54 I look forward to the pictures. In the meantime I'll try following your directions. Also I'm pretty good at biscuit joinery, but I suck at mortising and tenon joinery, any advice.

                thanks, and keep the dust flying

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: TS3650 Accessories

                  Originally posted by tooluser151 View Post
                  Also I'm pretty good at biscuit joinery, but I suck at mortising and tenon joinery, any advice.

                  thanks, and keep the dust flying
                  You and me both!!

                  For standard mortise and tenon (vs loose tenon) I will typically lay out the joint on both pieces first, then cut the tenon. Then I can double-check the layout of the mortise and cot it exactly as wide and deep as need be. I find having a REALLY sharp chisel helps immensely when cleaning up the mortise.

                  If you're doing loose mortise then I won't be any help. I can't make the little pieces well enough yet to work.
                  I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: TS3650 Accessories

                    I usually do it the opposite of Sandy. I make the mortise first. I find it easier to shave the tenon to fit the mortise than vice versa. If I go too far, it is easier for me to glue on a shim to the tenon and recut, than to try to tighten up the inside of a hole. Neither way is wrong. It is what works for you and either way takes some practice.
                    The most important thing is to determine which face(s) of the joint must be flush (ie outside of door, edges/front of cabinet, etc) and mark them. This (these) is your index side, so all depths of cut are referenced from this face on both pieces. That way, if the boards are of slightly different thickness/width, the viewed side will be flush and smooth.

                    JMTCW

                    Go
                    Last edited by Gofor; 12-25-2007, 10:55 PM.
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: TS3650 Accessories

                      not to get too far off topic- but I always cut the mortise first, and I think if you look around at books/shows/etc you'll see that. I find it easier to trim the tenon down with sandpaper to get a good, snug fit. you could cut the tenon and then the mortise and then trim the tenon, it's just that if you make the mortise too big you have to do some major re-working on the tenon.

                      either way will work if you're careful though. I guess order doesn't matter. What's easier for me is to start with a tenon just a shade big and sand/plane it down. I do the same with groove and stub joints for doors.

                      great questions, let's move to a new thread though in case other people want to chime in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: TS3650 Accessories

                        newb question, are these snug fit inserts suppose to reduce dust flying?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: TS3650 Accessories

                          Deuce, are you referring to the Zero Clearance Insert? The purpose of a ZCI is to reduce or eliminate chipping and tear-out of material being cut. The idea is the wood is supported on either side of the blade, so tear-out on the underside of the cut (common on table saws) is reduced.
                          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: TS3650 Accessories

                            oops, double post
                            Last edited by DeuceLee; 01-23-2008, 09:52 AM. Reason: double post

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: TS3650 Accessories

                              Originally posted by VASandy View Post
                              Deuce, are you referring to the Zero Clearance Insert? The purpose of a ZCI is to reduce or eliminate chipping and tear-out of material being cut. The idea is the wood is supported on either side of the blade, so tear-out on the underside of the cut (common on table saws) is reduced.
                              that makes sense...

                              what does that do for dust though? does it make it worst? since dust can't drop down below it?

                              Comment

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