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TS3650 alignment questions

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  • TS3650 alignment questions

    Hello all; new to the group, just purchased my 3650 on the weekend and am trying to set it up and wondering about some alignment issues I have:
    1. Fence height above table is supposed to be about 8 pages (.025"), but due to the placement of the holes in the table for the rail installation, the lowest I can get (on the left and center), is .066". The right side is about .054". And no, I don't have a dremel to elongate the holes. These measurements are 2x and more over Ridgid specs.
    2. One extension is low in the middle (front to back), so it is below the main table by .008" in the middle where it mounts to the main table. It is even with the main table at the front and back. The left side of the main table appear to have a hump in the middle causing this.
    Are either of these things I should be concerned about (for a saw in this price category?)

    I could also add that out of the box, almost all settings needed adjustment.
    The arbor does not have the dip problem with dado blades.

    Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by handyguy; 12-12-2007, 11:55 PM.

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 alignment questions

    You might be able to coax the middle of that wing into place. Loosen the middle bolts a bit, and try tapping on a wood block to persuade it into alignment. Obviously you don't want to wail on it with a 5# sledge, but some firm taps might do the trick.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: TS3650 alignment questions

      Maybe you bought a bad one? My extension on the left side was lower in the middle where it met with the main table, but the front and read mated right up. I loosened the two inside bolts (the ones that attach the extension to the main table) and then took a C-clamp and put it in the hole in the cast iron extension and placed the contact points of the C-clamp right on the joint where the extension mates up with the table. I proceeded to tighten the C-clamp, the extenstion and main table mated up and re-tightened the bolts. It's now flush. May want to try that. If all else fails, I know it's going to be a PITA, take it back and get a new one. The holes could have been mis-drilled from the factory.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: TS3650 alignment questions

        Originally posted by handyguy View Post
        Hello all; new to the group, just purchased my 3650 on the weekend and am trying to set it up and wondering about some alignment issues I have:
        1. Fence height above table is supposed to be about 8 pages (.025"), but due to the placement of the holes in the table for the rail installation, the lowest I can get (on the left and center), is .066". The right side is about .054". And no, I don't have a dremel to elongate the holes. These measurements are 2x and more over Ridgid specs.
        2. One extension is low in the middle (front to back), so it is below the main table by .008" in the middle where it mounts to the main table. It is even with the main table at the front and back. The left side of the main table appear to have a hump in the middle causing this.
        Are either of these things I should be concerned about (for a saw in this price category?)

        I could also add that out of the box, almost all settings needed adjustment.
        The arbor does not have the dip problem with dado blades.

        Thanks for your help.
        Hewood and Sawhorse both have good suggestions for flattening the table. Try those, then re-attach the rails and see if there's any improvement in the fence clearance. It's really best to get that fence to sit down close to the table (without touching, of course).

        If the fence clearance is still off, or if it's different from left to right along the table, the rails or the table may be off. Either one will cause problems down the road. The table and fence need to be as flat and level as possible. If the table isn't flat along it's distance, sheet goods won't cut straight. It could lead to binding or other safety issues that could seriously injure people. It's also not good to have a tool that won't cut straight!

        You'll hear some say that you want the back of the fence to heel away from the blade a bit. I think that's a personal preference. Having the fence just a tiny bit off in the back means that work won't bind on the back of the blade. If something does bind on the back, serious problems can arise and lead to major medical problems like having to surgically remove a piece of wood from you that got shot back. Generally that's a VERY BAD thing! However, my fence is straight to the back, and I've never had a binding issue at all. I use the splitter and guard as often as is possible. I like using featherboards.

        Remember...it's a table saw. Large spinning blade-o-sharpness vs your thin skin. Safety is paramount. Fingers and blood should never have cause to leave you.
        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: TS3650 alignment questions

          As for the table, the advice given is good. Cast Iron is a bit flexible, but will set in time, so you should be able to straighten out the .008 difference and it will become a permanent fix.
          As for the fence, the first main concern is that the rear rail is below or exactly even with the miter slot. If it is high, it will interfere with the miter guage and any other jigs or fixtures you buy or make for it. I was only able to get mine even with the bottom of the miter slot. Other than that, as long the fence stays true (ie, same distance front and back) from the miter slot, you are okay. If you are going to slide jigs across the top, it needs to be the same height measurement front to back. If it is a bit high, you can always put an auxiliary fence on it if you are worried about thin stock sliding beneath it. I put one on mine the first day I had it, as I knew I was going to be using a dado blade to cut rabbets, and it stays on the saw. Throws off the fence rule mark by the thickness of the aux fence, but you get used to allowing for it. I doubt my original fence is within the 1/64th measurement and I have had no problems in two years of a lot of use.
          As these are all through bolt/nuts, you can slightly enlarge the holes to allow more adjustment if you feel comfortable doing that. Use a high speed on the drill and ease the bit into the hole for best results and prevent grabbing.
          As for your question on should you be concerned about this for a saw at this price range: Considering how things are going, probably not, but why not make it as good as a saw in the next higher price range? It has that capability, IMHO.

          Go

          PS: Like Sandy, I do not "kick out" my fence adjustment, as it allows for error. If you can set the kick-out small enough to not be noticeable, why not set it true to begin with? I do use the blade guard/splitter whenever possible, and I use featherboards.
          Last edited by Gofor; 12-13-2007, 09:01 PM.
          Practicing at practical wood working

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: TS3650 alignment questions

            An update for you; I used the C clamp method to align the extension wing within reason (broke my first small clamp!)

            The rear fence rail rides just below the miter gauge slot, so that is not an issue.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TS3650 alignment questions

              Update#2:
              Picked up a dial indicator to help set up and check the saw out. My cuts are not as nice as I would like and it's hard to know where the problem lies without a measurement tool. I also purchased a new Freud Premier Fusion blade - the teeth are like mirrors on this puppy. Haven't run wood through it yet, though.
              The arbor runout was just less than .001" laterally (arbor screw up/down) and near zero axially (arbor flange left/right).
              With the blade mounted, the runout on the blade was about .001" at the outer edge.
              My blade/miter gauge parallelissm is out of wack though, at .008". Gotta adjust the trunion. ughh.
              More later.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TS3650 alignment questions

                If the alignment is only out a bit, you can adjust the rear trunnions using the cam lever that's unique to the 3650, which should be fairly easy. It gets more difficult if you need to tweak the front bracket as well. Set the fence parallel to the miter slots, then adjust the blade to the slots as needed. You can use a basic $10 combo square pretty effectively to measure between the slot of teeth of the blade to check alignment.

                That Fusion should be some thoroughbred performer for you once you get dialed in. I've got a very similar Infinity Super General that's brand new on the market. Be aware that blades of that style may be a bit more prone to burning if the alignment is off. The side clearance is tight by design to give a polished edge, but that same characteristic that's intended to polish can become burn if wood pinches, binds, or generally bogs down a bit. You may want to experiment with blade height to get ideal results. You might still want to consider a thin kerf 24T ripper if you cut dense materials much over 6/4".

                Good luck!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: TS3650 alignment questions

                  Update #3:
                  Messed around with the trunion and got the blade parallel to about .0015".
                  Did the fence then - it bows out at the top by about .0015" as well, so that gives me the safety clearence some recommend.

                  Comment

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