Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

How small is small?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How small is small?

    I'm just starting to put together my first shop. It's 16x18. The only tools I have so far are a CMS and a Ridgid TS2400 portable table saw. (Black Friday rocked!)

    I have the opportunity to buy a nicely maintained, 25 year old Shopsmith 510 with Bandsaw, jointer, and belt sander for $1200.

    But for this price, I could get a new dedicated jointer, sander and a 14" bandsaw.

    I'm worried about crowding myself. At what point is a shop small enough where I should start considering a Shopsmith instead of dedicated machines?

  • #2
    Re: How small is small?

    I know this is a little off the current topic.....but the picture below is the smallest piece of trim I have ever installed. A double 45° that is 3/8" total length.

    bsherman.....with that small of a shop I would definitely go with combo machines. There is now way you would have for all the tools you could get with the combo. Any chance of convincing your significant other to take out a second mortgage and build a nice shop??? (Only kidding)

    Seriously, Good luck with your shop. Woodworking is the most personally satisfying hobby/profession I can think of....so do what it takes!

    Zeno
    Attached Files
    “Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one less scoundrel in the world.” —Thomas Carlyle

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How small is small?

      I would still think a lot depends on how much your going to do, I think the "shop-smith" type combination tools are not what they are advertised, I think you would do better with individual tools,
      about the time you want to do some thing you have tear down and reset up, and if you have to do a different item, such as joint some thing before you finish the either band saw cuts, then it is tear down and set up and tear down and set up, and IMO even as a lathe the shop smith is light, and not as rigid as it should be, I would rather have my tools tight and have to pull out than have the all in one, I once was given a shop-smith and I ended up selling it to some one how wanted it worse than I did, the one thing I did like is the variable speed head on it, (if I remember shop-smith does sell individual stands for the band saw and the jointer) but there not cheap the way I remember it).

      I would think even individual bench top tools would be better, than a combination unit.

      on the jointer, one can put in a straight cutter in a router table and joint on it if you set the fences correctly, and 95%+ of the time your jointing less than a 1" thickness, so using a router table may do what you want on the low cost end and saving space,
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: How small is small?

        I have a friend that had a Shopsmith....he was very glad when he got rid of it and bought other tools. He said it was a big hassel to have to set it up every time he wanted to change tools.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: How small is small?

          I also have a small area for a shop and have to agree with BHD. I look at the jointers EVERY time I'm at HD or Lowes but have to walk away. I have a Bosch 1619 in my router table that joints just about everything I need to do in a small shop. It's a hard choice. Do a "tool dream layout" of your floor space. See what will fit where. Then decide on your tool priorities. This points out that "bigger is better" for wood shops too.
          Jim
          Jim

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: How small is small?

            I'll go along with the other opinions about having individual tools rather than an "all-in-one" tool like the ShopSmith.

            It's a nice machine and appears to be very well made (I've watched a few demos). However, give some thought as to how you think you'll work through your project(s). While it would be nice to think that you'll do all of you cutting, drilling, sanding, etc. in complete and well defined steps, it just doesn't work out that way for most of us. So with a tool like the ShopSmith, you'll be spending more time tearing down and setting up and then repeating the process, because you have to revisit a step. At least that's my opinion.

            I'd much rather have the individual tools and set the shop up accordingly. Even with the ShopSmith, you have to have room for the components that are not setup at a particular moment.

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How small is small?

              bsherman,
              If you by chance use VISIO, Harvey Chute has a free stencil of shop machines that can help layout a shop. I just downloaded it this past week. Take a look.
              Jim

              http://home.comcast.net/~hchute/wood...hoplayouts.htm
              Jim

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How small is small?

                Your choice in table saws answered your question already. Go with individual machines and put them on wheels. Your shop will be big enough for anything!
                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How small is small?

                  My shop is about the same size as your shop in square footage. All of my stationary tools are on portable bases and can be moved about the shop when I need them. I also have a centrally located dust collector that I connect to the tools when I am using them for dust and chip collection. I currently have a TS2400 (mounted on an old Ryobi saw stand), a miter saw, drill press, belt/disc sander, oscillating sander, 6-inch joiner, 12-inch planer, band saw and a mini-lathe. I built a work bench, also on casters, that I can move around the shop. The bench also stores an air compressor and router table. I built a fold down table that is attached to the TS2400 since I need an outfeed table for the saw. I take advantage of wall space and overhead space for storage. I would go with individual tools and forget about the Shopsmith.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: How small is small?

                    I also have a small garage shop and have found that it is possible to do a good job of jointing on a table saw.

                    Make a wood or MDF fence similar to a sacrificial fence and set it up to attach to the saw fence. Next glue a thin sheet of hardboard to the fence from the lead edge of the saw blade in the fully up position to the rear edge of the wood or MDF fence. This will become the outfeed side of the fence. With the saw blade down and the blade guard removed, attach the new "fence" to the saws fence (add a few clamps for safety) and position the new "Fence" over the saw blade with the left edge of the blade flush with the left (outer) edge of the hardboard. Turn on the saw and slowly raise the blade to cut the hardboard away.

                    Turn off the saw when the blade cuts through the hardboard at the lead edge of the saw blade.

                    You will now have a quickly attachable and removable jointer fence. Use it like a jointer and feed the stock to be jointed through the "infeed" side and transfer pressure against the fence to the "outfeed" side as the stock is run through. (I use fingerboards to keep my fingers away from the blade).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How small is small?

                      If you're thinking of dropping $1200 on a shopsmith, I would instead look at the new combo jointers/planers that JET and Grizzly have debuted. Those are in the same price range, and I believe you'd get a lot more quality for your dollars, while still saving on space. Both have 12" *JOINTERS*/planers, some with spiral cutter heads. And apparently it only takes seconds to switch between functions.

                      Same may argue that you cannot do without a bandsaw, but I find my gets only occasional use. However, to properly surface and size lumber you really need the jointer and planer. So, if you're willing to bump up to $1500-ish total, you'd get a top quality trio, in only two machines.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How small is small?

                        I'm a recovering Shopsmith owner, and I have to pile on with the majority here. Go for the stationary tools and mount them on mobile bases. The ONLY thing I miss is the lathe (mostly because I haven't replaced that function yet), but IMHO this is what SM did best. Not too crazy since the whole thing is "lathe-based." There are alway compromises when making a multi-function anything. In the case of SM, they made lots of compromises that resulted in tools that don't perform nearly as well as they should.

                        Just my $0.02

                        Steve
                        Last edited by SWLigler; 12-20-2007, 02:14 PM. Reason: typo

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: How small is small?

                          Originally posted by dleeharrison View Post
                          I built a fold down table that is attached to the TS2400 since I need an outfeed table for the saw. I take advantage of wall space and overhead space for storage. I would go with individual tools and forget about the Shopsmith.
                          dleeharrison
                          If possible and get a chance, could you post pictures of
                          the fold down table you built for your ts2400.
                          Im looking for some ideas for building one for my ts2400

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: How small is small?

                            Billmoy, Is your setup kind of like this one but deeper? http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb/

                            You should be able to joint up to 3" thick then?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: How small is small?

                              Davet, dleeharrison, I'd like to see that too if possible.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X