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  • #31
    Re: Bisbuit Joiners

    JoeF,

    I like mortice and tenon joints because of their great strength and they are great for "knock-down" assemblies where a longer tenon and a wedge can be used. My experience to date, unfortunately, as been with things like workbenches, tool stands, and similar heavy-use assemblies. I have yet to have the opportunity to build more elegant furniture, but that's in the near future when I finally finish working on the house reno.

    I've always done my M&T joints by cutting the mortices by hand with a chisel and then doing the tenons on my radial arm saw. Last summer I finally had a router table and found it great for cutting the tenons.

    Once you really get into cutting mortices with a chisel, it goes well, but is still time consuming. But then I'm talking about fairly stout pieces no thinner than a 2 x 1. A dedicated power tool makes it more effecient for sure and certainly the Domino turns it into a quick exercise. I must have remembered the price wrong... probably my head wouldn't except the $800 figure !

    I should add that I've seen some articles and illustrations where a router can be used freehand to cut biscuit slots and even mortices. Personally, I'm not very comfortable with that. I think at minimum you need a proper jig or clamped guide to keep the router from ripping free and either ruining your work or endangering yourself. But I do recognize that everyone has their own comfort level.

    Good luck on your future woodworking,

    CWS
    Last edited by CWSmith; 04-07-2008, 03:16 PM.

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    • #32
      Re: Bisbuit Joiners

      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
      JoeF,

      I like mortice and tenon joints because of their great strength and they are great for "knock-down" assemblies where a longer tenon and a wedge can be used. My experience to date, unfortunately, as been with things like workbenches, tool stands, and similar heavy-use assemblies. I have yet to have the opportunity to build more elegant furniture, but that's in the near future when I finally finish working on the house reno.

      I've always done my M&T joints by cutting the mortices by hand with a chisel and then doing the tenons on my radial arm saw. Last summer I finally had a router table and found it great for cutting the tenons.

      Once you really get into cutting mortices with a chisel, it goes well, but is still time consuming. But then I'm talking about fairly stout pieces no thinner than a 2 x 1. A dedicated power tool makes it more effecient for sure and certainly the Domino turns it into a quick exercise. I must have remembered the price wrong... probably my head wouldn't except the $800 figure !

      I should add that I've seen some articles and illustrations where a router can be used freehand to cut biscuit slots and even mortices. Personally, I'm not very comfortable with that. I think at minimum you need a proper jig or clamped guide to keep the router from ripping free and either ruining your work or endangering yourself. But I do recognize that everyone has their own comfort level.

      Good luck on your future woodworking,

      CWS
      I think for $400, it would be a much easier sell; because when you get a factory made jig for the mortises, that isn't cheap either.

      I plan on doing a table with my FIL. We are thinking of using M&T for the joinery on 1 by stock for the frame. The tenons, we will cut on the TS, for the mortises the thought is to use a doweling jig for the first hole, then putting a router in that hole (I have only a fixed base). and a small jig to make sure it comes out the right size. After that, then just cleaning it out with a chisel.

      I am thinking of getting a $25 drill guide and just using that for the whole thing before a final chisel cleanup.

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      • #33
        Re: Bisbuit Joiners

        Originally posted by djfunk View Post
        I

        So, would you guys recommend using the router or biscuit joiner to put slots in decking (4/4x6 Mangaris)? I'll put putting in about 276 fasteners, so cutting 552 slots...whoa, that's the first time I did the actual math.

        Thanks guys!
        I would think the biscuit cutter would be the safer of the two machines. and probly easier.

        would I buy one for the job I do not know may jsut depend on how much side pull there is when the slot is cut, with the router.
        all I know it is a lot of saw or bit spinning around out there.
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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        • #34
          Re: Bisbuit Joiners

          Originally posted by cpw View Post
          I think for $400, it would be a much easier sell; because when you get a factory made jig for the mortises, that isn't cheap either.

          I plan on doing a table with my FIL. We are thinking of using M&T for the joinery on 1 by stock for the frame. The tenons, we will cut on the TS, for the mortises the thought is to use a doweling jig for the first hole, then putting a router in that hole (I have only a fixed base). and a small jig to make sure it comes out the right size. After that, then just cleaning it out with a chisel.

          I am thinking of getting a $25 drill guide and just using that for the whole thing before a final chisel cleanup.
          Take a look at this thing. www.mortisepal.com
          Just came across it in the most recent issue of Woodsmith and I am PSYCHED to get one... I have a dedicated mortiser, and frankly, I hate using it (well, I hate the setup and calibration and eccentricities)... I hate chiseling even more!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Bisbuit Joiners

            Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
            Take a look at this thing. www.mortisepal.com
            Just came across it in the most recent issue of Woodsmith and I am PSYCHED to get one... I have a dedicated mortiser, and frankly, I hate using it (well, I hate the setup and calibration and eccentricities)... I hate chiseling even more!
            I haven't seen one in action, but did consider it. The problem is I don't yet have a plunge router (I'm borrowing my dad's 1hp fixed based Craftsman for now). That and it is about $200. This is sort of why I think that a domino clone at $400 would do really well, a plunge router is about $150-200; the jig is $200; so you would compete really directly with the router + jig approach.

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            • #36
              Re: Bisbuit Joiners

              Originally posted by cpw View Post
              I haven't seen one in action, but did consider it. The problem is I don't yet have a plunge router (I'm borrowing my dad's 1hp fixed based Craftsman for now). That and it is about $200. This is sort of why I think that a domino clone at $400 would do really well, a plunge router is about $150-200; the jig is $200; so you would compete really directly with the router + jig approach.
              Get a multi-base router kit. Then you have a plunge, usable for mortises with or without this jig. But then you also have the flexibility for the other 10,000 things a router can do. Domino is very cool, but a one-trick, very expensive, pony... IMO.

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              • #37
                Re: Bisbuit Joiners

                Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
                Get a multi-base router kit. Then you have a plunge, usable for mortises with or without this jig. But then you also have the flexibility for the other 10,000 things a router can do. Domino is very cool, but a one-trick, very expensive, pony... IMO.
                The router is somewhere on my short list that also includes a 23 gauge pinner and band saw. My current project would benefit from the pinner and my next would benefit from the bandsaw. The pinner and band saw have substitutes, but the router doesn't so much.

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                • #38
                  Re: Bisbuit Joiners

                  Originally posted by cpw View Post
                  The router is somewhere on my short list that also includes a 23 gauge pinner and band saw. My current project would benefit from the pinner and my next would benefit from the bandsaw. The pinner and band saw have substitutes, but the router doesn't so much.
                  I just recently got a 23g pin nailer, and I LOVE it. I wound up getting the P-C, which just a few days ago was $99 at HD, FYI. Random glue-ups are so easy now. I can hardly believe how small those darn pins are. They ARE visible, but just barely.

                  The Grex is reputed to be the *best*, but at twice the price I couldn't justify it.

                  Bandsaws... as I'm sure you read, the Ridgid BS is good / great, IF you make a lot of adjustments and add-ons (otherwise it's pretty sucky). If you can find one used from a disenfrancised user for a great deal, get the add-ons and you should be a happy camper.

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                  • #39
                    Re: Bisbuit Joiners

                    Originally posted by cpw View Post
                    ...This is sort of why I think that a domino clone at $400 would do really well...
                    You're right, a Domino clone at $400 would be nice.

                    However...you're SOL on that, since such an animal doesn't exist.

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