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  • How would you check out a used table saw?

    I've stumbled across a used Ridgid TS3650 that's described as > 1 year old, lightly used and in excellent condition. The seller's come down to in price and I so think I'll give it a look. For reference, here's a link to HD's site for details on the TS3650:
    http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...P_PartNu mber

    So, two questions:
    1. Based on the current retail of, the seller's come down to 61.3% of the current retail. I'm phrasing it that way because a price here may not necessarily be comparable to where you are. So, just multiply the current retail for this saw in your area to get what what the comparable selling price would be for you. Based on this, would this be a reasonable price for this saw - assuming it's in the shape described, did in fact experience the level of service described, and is complete (see below)?

    2. I'm, of course, going to want to crawl under the hood and check it out before committing to purchase. In terms of things to check, what would you look at? I thought these seemed reasonable:
    - ensure blade guard and splitter are present
    - check if miter guage is included
    - check if regular and dado throat plates are included
    - check if blade wrench is included
    - visually inspect the trunnions for wear/damage
    - raise & lower the blade through its full range
    - angle the blade through its full range
    - test the mobile base for proper operation
    - test the ripfence's lock at front of saw and back of saw
    - check the tabletop for flatness (I'll bring my 50" straightedge)
    - check the arbor for runout (I'll bring my dial indicator & stand)
    - ask the seller to run a cut

    Would these things seem reasonable to you if I was to roll up and kick the tires of a saw you were selling? Is there anything you'd suggest adding to this list? Lastly, if it turns out there are things that are deficient, or the saw isn't in the condition described, what would you say would be reasonable amounts to propose the price be decreased by?


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    Thanks,
    Roland

  • #2
    Re: How would you check out a used table saw?

    That list looks pretty good. I recently bought a 2412 used, and I can think of a few more things to check. I discovered them afterwards, but they don't seem to have affected the operation of the saw (and I got a good deal on it anyways). Check if it has the defective arbor. Ridgid might still be doing free replacements, but it's an extra headache. On mine some, of the gears for the raising mechanism were chipped. No idea how that happened, but it doesn't appear to affect its operation. Take the belt off and spin both the motor and trunion by hand. This will give you a feel for if there is any damage to the bearings in either one. Also, the tilt lock on the 2412 is in a poor location (I think the 3650 is the same). If you have the tilt/bevel lock handle in the wrong spot (fully unlocked) it will jam on the underside of the table when you try to go to 45 deg and possibly cause damage. Check to see if it's shaft is bent, or if there are any marks on the underside of the table where it would have jammed. Hope this helps.

    ps, mine didn't come with a splitter/guard, and if anyone has an idea on how to replace it, let me know. I don't want to have to have to buy one from Ridgid for $100+, but I may have to.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How would you check out a used table saw?

      Y indicates I would check these areas.
      D is Don't Care.
      N is No would not check or not important.

      Y- ensure blade guard and splitter are present
      Y- check if miter guage is included
      Y- check if regular and dado throat plates are included
      Dado plate is an accessory for this saw so if there is one with the saw that is a plus, but not a biggie if its not there, you can make one easily.
      D- check if blade wrench is included
      If they are not included to me its not a big deal as they are not worth the steel they are made from. There's two by the way.
      Y- visually inspect the trunnions for wear/damage
      Worth doing but easier said than done.
      Y- raise & lower the blade through its full range
      Check for smooth operation
      Y- angle the blade through its full range
      Check for smooth operation but be aware that the limit stops may be out of adjustment and prevent full travel so check if you are seeing something less than 45 or 90°, travel stops are allen screws in the table top in front of the blade.
      Y- test the mobile base for proper operation.
      Most likely reason for improper operation is not assembled per the manual. If all the parts are there then look at how tight the bolts are.
      Y- test the ripfence's lock at front of saw and back of saw
      Also check if the fence square to table top.
      Y- check the tabletop for flatness (I'll bring my 50" straightedge)
      Y- check the arbor for runout (I'll bring my dial indicator & stand)
      Check for new style arbor, see these threads:
      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=7585
      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...highlight=3650

      Y- ask the seller to run a cut

      Check stand for missing fasteners and general sturdiness.
      Check tilt and elevation handwheels are not bent.
      Check front and rear rails are not bent(can happen if the rails are used to lift or move the saw).
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment

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