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Cutting order

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  • Cutting order

    Hello everyone,

    I'm making some drawers for a set of Captains beds. The front will be Oak and the sides are pine. I'm joining them with locking rabbets. After making my cutting list I have 2 10'x8"x1" pine that needs to 16"x7"x1/2" & 19"x7"x1/2"

    Should I thickness plane the wood before crosscutting it? I see pros and cons to either way. By the way I have a TP1300 and a TS3612.

    Should I rip it before I crosscut it or plane it?

    My plan was to crosscut it, rip and joint it, and then plane it. But I don't know why it couldn't be done another way and if another way would produce something better.

    Just wanting your thoughts. Thanks

  • #2
    I suggest using the thickness planer when the work is still in its longest lenghts. All planers can and will snipe from time to time. Even with locking heads and level infeed and out feed tables there are many other things that can lead to snipe. You need to allow for it. I believe the TP1300 has great snipe control features but when snipe happens its about 2 1/2" at each end. You therefore need to allow for 5" which could be alot of waste if you cut all your pieces to length before you plane.

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    • #3
      I may be wrong but I always thought snipe was the difference in thickness from the begining of the cut to the end of the cut usually measured in thousandths of an inch. It is usually caused by vibration and pressure of the wood forcing the cutter to move upward. Not sure what the correct name is for what you are describing but it is usually caused by improperly supported longer boards and gouging occurs for the distance between the cutter head and the rear pressure roll

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      • #4
        I may be wrong but I always thought snipe was the difference in thickness from the begining of the cut to the end of the cut usually measured in thousandths of an inch. It is usually caused by vibration and pressure of the wood forcing the cutter to move upward. Not sure what the correct name is for what you are describing but it is usually caused by improperly supported longer boards and gouging occurs for the distance between the cutter head and the rear pressure roll

        Comment

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