Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

How to use hand planes

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How to use hand planes

    I got two for xmas, a block plane and a smoothing plane. Both are run of the mill planes (one is a stanley and I forgot what the other is) and I have never even held one before. Its not something I expected to use that often but from surfing different woodworking sites they seem pretty important to have in the arsenal.

    Seeing how I never used one before how do you use a hand plane? I might be an idiot but I cant even figure out how to get the balde down so it protudes out the bottom. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: How to use hand planes

    Pez,

    My experience with hand planes is pretty old and it's certainly not a tool that I've used often enough that I'd want to offer advice on. I just did a "Google" search on "using wood planes" and got several decent hits.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...=Google+Search

    Give these a try for now and I'm sure there will be some good advice following from the many veteran craftsman here on the forum.

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: How to use hand planes

      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
      Pez,

      My experience with hand planes is pretty old and it's certainly not a tool that I've used often enough that I'd want to offer advice on. I just did a "Google" search on "using wood planes" and got several decent hits.

      http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&i...=Google+Search

      Give these a try for now and I'm sure there will be some good advice following from the many veteran craftsman here on the forum.

      CWS
      Thanks! Found a few good sites.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: How to use hand planes

        Not only do you want to google about how to use a hand plane, but also you will need to know how to tune it, and how to sharpen the iron (blade). For the plane to work correctly, the blade should be sharp enough to shave with. Google the "scary sharp" method for an inexpensive way to get the iron razor sharp). The only ones I know of that are ready to use out of the box are the Lee Valley and Lie-Nielsons which are in the $150-$300 range for the block plane. This is another area where you would be well advised to seek out a class on basic hand planing. You can probably find them at Woodcraft (if you have a store near you) or possibly can get help from one of the hand tool clubs in your area (search for "hand woodworking" or " neanderthal wood working"). If you have any serious woodworking stores in your area, they should be able to point you in the right direction.
        Honestly, altho you will be able to get some tips here, learning how to use them will take a lot of reading and trial and error on your part. Don't give up, tho, because there are few satisfactions in woodworking that rival the moment when you first get that smooth continuous .001" shaving curling off the iron and you get almost to a zen state of being "one with the wood".

        I tried to find some good sites, but the links I had in my bookmarks are no longer valid. If I find some I'll post them.

        Welcome to neanderthal side

        Go
        Last edited by Gofor; 01-11-2008, 10:42 PM. Reason: original links were not valid
        Practicing at practical wood working

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: How to use hand planes

          I've been trying to use mine for quite some time. As mentioned by GoFor, the satisfaction of the finish is bliss. I've only had that on one occasion and I think it was a mistake. From what I've read, ALL new planes have to be tuned and the iron honed. I'll dig thru my magazines and see if I can locate some articles for you. To lower the iron, loosen the knob on the face then rotate the knob on the top. You want the edge of the iron to be just barely exposed. re-tighten the other knob. These knobs have actual names, I don't remember what though. Try them out on your own, just remember to angle the plane as you make your pass along the wood. Have fun...
          If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: How to use hand planes

            Pez: I taught carpentry in a vocational school. One of the courses was "Use and care of tools". PM me and I will be glad to help you out.
            Jim

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How to use hand planes

              Do you know of anybody in your area who uses handplanes? That is the best way to go on your first plane. A new stanley will definitely not work right without a lot of work. If you are in the Los Angeles area I would be happy to show you how to make it work and how to use it.
              www.TheWoodCellar.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How to use hand planes

                Originally posted by Rafael View Post
                Do you know of anybody in your area who uses handplanes? That is the best way to go on your first plane. A new stanley will definitely not work right without a lot of work. If you are in the Los Angeles area I would be happy to show you how to make it work and how to use it.
                My hobbies tend to be very different than my friends - they are all gear heads and I am not. If I were in the LA area I would certainly take you up on your offer (which is very kind of you by the way) but I am on the other side of the country, CT.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How to use hand planes

                  Take a look over at sawmillcreek.org, they have people all over the country that provide help.
                  I think they call it a mentor's list. If there is no one on that list near you post that you need some help getting started with your plane and someone near you may offer assistance.
                  www.TheWoodCellar.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: How to use hand planes

                    Pez
                    Wood Planes will always have there place even in today's carpentry field.
                    Espeicley mine in doing custom doors.
                    My field we dont like to take wood of the door. I to like to smooth the jamb for the new door to fit.
                    I am a collector and user of planes. My bull nose and rabbit planes are among the most usefull in installing new doors into old jams.
                    I think you got a very nice gift!
                    But as Gofor said it aint worth a lick if you cant shave with it.

                    Mk.II HONING GUIDE gave me the angle I needed with a jig for setting High angles, Starndard angles and back bevels.
                    I was given GROZ plan set. It is a #4 and a low angle 65 1/2 block plane. It took some work, but I have them tuned and working O K but not like a Stanley Bailey.!!
                    Last edited by bob bridgewater; 01-14-2008, 11:08 AM.
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                    Be safe out there folks
                    Bob B
                    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: How to use hand planes

                      I dont even have anything to sharpen the planes yet so I need to take care of that. Funny thing is I was in a Woodcraft Saturday and got a sharping jig for a scraper but forgot about the hand planes.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How to use hand planes

                        When I read this post yesterday it reminded me that I haven't used planes in a long time. So today I grabbed a block plane from the back of a drawer, touched it up a bit and planned some scrap. I had forgotten what fun it is to work with planes and to see the wood shiny and smooth instead of dull and smooth from sanding. To say nothing of the fact that I could still hear my CDs playing.

                        Tom

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: How to use hand planes

                          Originally posted by Pez View Post
                          I dont even have anything to sharpen the planes yet so I need to take care of that. Funny thing is I was in a Woodcraft Saturday and got a sharping jig for a scraper but forgot about the hand planes.
                          You can sharpen a plane iron razor sharp with wet/dry sandpaper and a flat surface (i.e. the cast iron top of the TS, but it will get rusty so I do not recommend this, or something as simple as a piece of glass. The glass shelves used for medicine cabinets will work. Personally, I have piece of granite. If there are any gravestone manufacturers near you, you may be able to pick up a piece of flat polished granite cheap out of their scrap pile). You will need wet/dry paper going down to about 2000gr. Its easy to find to 400, but smoother may require a trip to an auto parts store that sells auto finishing supplies (Carquest, etc). Over 2000 gr is a waste of time unless you have top premium quality irons. 1000 will do for a start. Some will recommend waterstones and up to 8000 grit finsh and honing polishes. After two cuts in pine, you will not know the difference. One cut in hard wood. You may want to go there but I would wait until you have learned to plane first. This will come into play of you start working highly figured woods such as hard burls or get into fine veneer and inlay work, which is way beyond my level of expertise and you will have a lot more variety of planes.
                          As for a guide, You can and many do it by hand but it takes a lot of practice. I started with a carriage bolt, a couple of flat washers and a couple wing nuts. It works but is a bit of a pain setting up the angle and keeping the iron flat. I still use this method to put a rounded edge for my scrub planes, but not much else. The Veritas guide set Bob Bridgewater mentioned is a bit expensive but worth the money in less agravation and a lot better accuracy. There are cheaper guides out there, but you really need to know what you are doing to make them work, and they do not work all that well. If you can afford the Veritas, I would recommend that for a starter. If you can't, PM me or post and I will tell you how to make an angle guage to set up the cheaper ones. The angle does not have to be exact. Where the Veritas excells is making it much easier to find the original angle when you go back to resharpen (hone ) the iron when it dulls.
                          The first step, tho, is to flatten the back of the iron for the first 1/2" or so. This step will take you longer than sharpening the bevel with a new iron. If the back is not flat, the edge will be concave or convex (most often concave). You only have to do it once, with the exception of a couple strokes to knock off a burr, but it is critical to getting a sharp iron.

                          Go
                          Practicing at practical wood working

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: How to use hand planes

                            My last post on your thread Pez really didn't say much on how to use a wood plane.
                            But in all reality it really did.
                            In order to understand your plane you first need to know how to take it apart and inspect your iron. This is your blade or cutter! Most planes need some fine tuning when you get them, and that means sharpening!
                            Most are cut to a 25* angle with the exception your low angle planes These might need a good back bevel, many block planes are like this.
                            Using a plane is where you find out how good your honing,set up,shapeing and technique skills are.
                            When ever possible glide your plane across your work at an angle. If your iron (blade) is cutting to deep just turn your brass adjusting knob counter clock wise, and if you dont get a bite turn it clock wise. Thats all I can say for now till you get out there and give it a try.
                            Last edited by bob bridgewater; 01-15-2008, 01:23 AM.
                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
                            Be safe out there folks
                            Bob B
                            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: How to use hand planes

                              If you will go to Tauton.com you will find lots of video's and pdf files on planes and the setup.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X