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  • Biscuit Joint Question

    Hello all, this is my 1st post here and I am looking forward to learn from many experience folks here from many days coming.

    1 question: Is there a way to create a good / decent Biscuit Joint without using a Biscuit Joiner tool itself ?

    I plan to put together a media center (2' deep x 5' wide) inside the nitch in my family room, so I want to joint 1'x5' pine boards with 3/4" thick to create 3 shelves. I choose pine and eliminated plywood (4'x8' sheet) also melamine wood (4'x8' sheet). Please share you thought. Thanks! Kev.

  • #2
    Re: Biscuit Joint Question

    There are router bits you can get that will do a biscuit slot. A little trickier to line up, but I'm sure they work just fine. You just need to pencil the slot on both pieces before you cut the biscuit slot (gotta do the same thing with the biscuit cutter anyway).

    As far as the solid pine shelves go, please be aware of wood movement. Using 1' wide boards, you're bound to get movement over the seasons. Basically, wood will swell in the summer (humidity) and shrink in the winter as the air gets dry. With 1' boards, you'll *PROBABLY* get at least 1/8" movement front to back. You need to make the shelves a little smaller in order to accommodate that movement. You can keep them flush in the front, as long as you leave a 1/8" gap in the back. Use attachments that let the boards move, as well. By that I mean, if you're going to screw the boards down, use a slotted attachment for the screw that will let it slide back and forth a bit.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Biscuit Joint Question

      Originally posted by VASandy View Post
      There are router bits you can get that will do a biscuit slot. A little trickier to line up, but I'm sure they work just fine. You just need to pencil the slot on both pieces before you cut the biscuit slot (gotta do the same thing with the biscuit cutter anyway).

      As far as the solid pine shelves go, please be aware of wood movement. Using 1' wide boards, you're bound to get movement over the seasons. Basically, wood will swell in the summer (humidity) and shrink in the winter as the air gets dry. With 1' boards, you'll *PROBABLY* get at least 1/8" movement front to back. You need to make the shelves a little smaller in order to accommodate that movement. You can keep them flush in the front, as long as you leave a 1/8" gap in the back. Use attachments that let the boards move, as well. By that I mean, if you're going to screw the boards down, use a slotted attachment for the screw that will let it slide back and forth a bit.
      what he/she said...
      How much wood could a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Biscuit Joint Question

        A router bit was all I had for quite some time. Works well.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Biscuit Joint Question

          Go to Harbor Freight and get you a cheap $40 biscuit cutter. It will do just fine unless you use it in a production environment. No need to go buy a $150 Porter Cable unit.
          The HF tool will be more accurate than trying to use a router.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Biscuit Joint Question

            If your just looking at a way to join the boards, without an expensive method of doing so (biscuit jointer or router w/bit), you might want to consider doweling the joint. A doweling jig is relatively inexpensive, and you can even make a reasonable facimile, if this is a one-time operation.

            CWS

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            • #7
              Re: Biscuit Joint Question

              Regardless of how you join the boards together, you better consider reinforcing the front and back edges. A five foot long shelf of 3/4 anything will sag if not reinforced.

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