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Intro + A Little Advise.

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  • Intro + A Little Advise.

    Hello everyone. I've been carousing this forum for about 1 solid month since I've found it. What an excellent resource! I spent that full month reading forum topics that date back to 2001. Granted I admit I only actually read about 60 percent of the topics, but what Ive gained in knowedge is invaluable.
    Well I've been around woodworking before, ie. drafting/woodshop 2 years in High School, My foster father of the last 2 years of my childhood was a professional woodworker. He taught me the ropes a bit here and there. Anyhow it all seems like so long ago and I've probably forgotten more than I know. I am about to get back into it in a month or so after just a bit more research. I have an expense, per Lady, of 2500 US. Unless I can get a 15 percent discount I realise I will have to leave a tool or 2 out of my intial setup. Not counting Jigs, Bits, so on. My interest is to build furniture for my home that I can pass to my children. Whatever other projects I can find time for, the skies the limit. I have a list of the tools I think I may need off the bat to keep future costs low and to achieve my goal. Can you'all please help me decide if Im making the right decisions on tool types, not "manufacturers". I also realise you can build anything with hand tools but it takes a heck of a lot longer in most cases. So here goes in order of perceived importance.
    Rigid Table Saw TS 3650, Rigid Joiner JP 0610, Rigid Planer TP 1300 LS, Rigid Band Saw BS 1400, Rigid Router R 2930, Rigid Miter Saw MS 1290 LZ, DeWalt Plate Joiner. I am sacrificing the drill press, and the stationary sander,at the moment; is this wise. I have a circular saw, a couple of palm sanders, shop vac, and a few other miscellaneous things. Sorry for the long post folks, future post will be much shorter. Anyhow great place could'nt be happier that I found it!

  • #2
    Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

    Welcome Cruelty! Sounds like you have done a good bit of homework. The only thing that'll rise the ire of folks is the bandsaw. Truely, that's not Ridgid's best tool. I have one, and while it's useful for small projects, it is not the best out there. Although it is inexpensive and will get you through well enough. You'll want to replace the belt and the tires, and make sure to spend the time to true the wheels and align everything properly.

    Get yourself a nice long straight edge, and a level too. A long level and a good straightedge are indispensables in setting up tools. The level is great for checking alignment of the wheels of the bandsaw. The long straightedge and level work for aligning the splitter on the table saw. You'll also want a decent, reliable dial indicator setup to align the blade and fence parallel to the miter slots. There's a good set from Grizzly (look in the President's specials) that has a magnetic base. It also comes with a caliper. The set is here http://grizzly.com/products/Magnetic...ombo-pk-/H3022

    And clamps. Get lots of clamps. Bar clamps, spring clamps, all sizes. Then you'll want more. Get long ones to truely torture cabinets.
    I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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    • #3
      Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

      The Ridgid bandsaw is definately one you should consider passing on. The Grizzly G0555 receives great reviews and is recommended by almost all who own one.

      The Ridgid miter saws are another tool that you might want to look elsewhere for. They have way to many reported problems with bevel cuts.

      I would also suggest you put off buying a plate joiner at this time and get a good drill press instead. I prefer floor models myself and you can find good ones of those starting at about $150. The plate joiner can be a handy tool but you can easily get by without one.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

        C2C,

        Welcome to the forum!

        I'll go along with the previous advisements on the Ridgid Band Saw and the miter saw. I don't own the bandsaw, but there are a number of reported concerns with this particular model. Nothing that can't be fixed with some time and fuss; but IMO, why should anyone have to tweak a new tool that much.

        I have the Ridgid 10" miter saw and really like it. But like the 12", the darn thing won't cut an accurate crosscut bevel. Something wrong with the casting design I think. Just it can't be adjusted. All other cuts are okay, but for cross-cut bevels, I have to use the RAS or the table saw.

        Like Badger Dave, I recommend you give some serious thought to the drill press, preferably a floor model.

        If you're going into the furniture part of the hobby, you might want to take a good look at getting a router table for your 2900. I bought the Rockler #1 table package w/the 23293 mounting plat (compatible with the 2900) and it works great for me. (http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=894). Had to build my own leg set, but you could also purchase one. There are other brands of fine tables out there too.

        A router table is really nice and almost essential for making moldings, edging, and other details.

        I hope this helps,

        CWS

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

          I would love to know how to get a good floor drill press for $150. That's the next big purchase I need to make, and I've been doing some shopping...I'm having trouble finding a good benchtop model for $150. Maybe I'm asking for too much in a drill press, but per the 06-07 FWW Tools and Shops issue, I'm trying to make sure I get apress with at least eight speeds, 3 inches of travel, and at lest 7 inches between spindle and post (throat depth, yes?).

          I've been looking at the Delta twin laser robot-looking thingy, but that's $174 just for a benchtop. I've also cruised through Harbor Freight and found a decent Central Machinery floor model, 16 speeds, decent depth stop for $189 on sale. (All the CM benchtop models I saw have crappy plastic depth stops, which is a deal breaker)

          Any recommendations on a good press? Am I asking too much?

          Originally posted by BadgerDave View Post
          The Ridgid bandsaw is definately one you should consider passing on. The Grizzly G0555 receives great reviews and is recommended by almost all who own one.

          The Ridgid miter saws are another tool that you might want to look elsewhere for. They have way to many reported problems with bevel cuts.

          I would also suggest you put off buying a plate joiner at this time and get a good drill press instead. I prefer floor models myself and you can find good ones of those starting at about $150. The plate joiner can be a handy tool but you can easily get by without one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

            Thank you very much everyone. Your advise is well taken. I thought I might ruffle a few feathers on the band saw issue. Do I sound a bit sick to say i wouldnt mind spending the time to fine tune it if it saved me enough money? I was also a bit concerned about Miter saw as well. I will do a bit more research on that 1. For the dial indicator, I have 1 but not sure if I totally trust it anymore as its old. 1 thing I did forget to mention, I also have set aside a seperate account of 500 for blades, bits, clamps and such. The 2500 is strictly power tools. I was planing on building my own router table, but it might be worth while to get a different setup in the meantime. Once again thanks for the replies, it was exactly the info I needed!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

              I think you've got a great starting list, but I believe a few things you could do without:
              - Band saw. Definitely don't get the Ridgid. You really could do a lot of woodworking without one, by getting a corded (or cordless) jigsaw instead. The only thing you can't do without the bandsaw is resawing... and do you see that happening in the foreseeable future?

              - Miter saw. Whilst it excels at the specific things that a miter saw is intended for, it doesn't really do anything that you can't also do with a table saw and a good miter gauge.
              Perhaps save the cost and space, and upgrade to a high quality miter gauge and a digital angle gauage (e.g. Wixey, or Beall).

              - Skip the biscuit joiner. You might go a long time before you find you *really* need this, as opposed to using floating tenons or even pocket hole joinery.

              ... And some things to maybe look at a spiffier option:
              - Router: Definitely get a multi-base kit. DeWalt, Porter-Cable, and even Rigid.

              - Drill press: If your budget is feeling squeezed, don't be afraid to consider a bench top drill press. As you probably saw in the drill press comparisons, bench top models have just as much oomph, and very comparable capacities as the floor standing (e.g. throat; quill stroke, etc). The only thing you really lose out on is vertical capacity. Do you really foresee yourself using the drill press on the end grain of legs or something? If so, is this something you could instead use a drilling jig to facilitate?

              - Sander. Give some thought to the Ridgid oscillating spindle / belt sander. It's a cool model (I wish I had it!) and, frankly, sanding is the worst activity!
              Alternatively, you could have your drill press do double duty as a spindle sander, just make sure it has a quill lock.

              - Miscellaneous. VASandy has the right of it. Get a good quality straightedge. I really like the Woodpecker SERX... 48" straight edge that can stand on edge. Lovely and useful.

              Clamps... holy moley the saying is totally true.. can never have enough. If you're able to purchase soon, Rockler has F-style clamps on sale right now, 2-for-1 for certain sizes. If you're looking at some large parallel clamps, keep in mind the "Bessey X-Stender" which allows you to connect Bessey based parallel clamps together (This includes Woodcraft's clamps). So you can make two 24" clamps into a 40"+ clamp.. or two 48" clamps into an 80" clamp.

              Measuring / marking. Get a high quality straight edge ruler, and also a good T-square. Again here, I personally really like the Woodpecker products. Digital angle gauge: awesome item.

              Safety!!! Ear muffs, push sticks and featherboards, and the all important dust mask.

              Good luck shoppin'!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

                Welcome to the forum.

                All I would add is that if you plan to buy a planner I am not sure a shop vac will handle the chips. I have never tried to operate a planner using a shop vac as collection maybe it will work, but those things really like to make chips. You may wish to consider a more elaborate dust/chip collection system.

                Tom

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                • #9
                  Re: Intro + A Little Advise.

                  Hi Cruelty

                  Great name

                  Welcome aboard
                  Cheers! - Jim
                  -------------
                  All truth passes through three stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident. - Schopenhauer

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