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T-9, how much and where?

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  • T-9, how much and where?

    Finished building my TS3650 and have been making small boxes to learn. I just picked up some T-9 and wondered if the table top is the only place you spray it? Doesn't the trunnions get rusty too? Seems everyone talks of rust only on the table top. Granted, i'm a newbie, but doesn't all the cast iron rust or just where it's been ground flat on the top?

    Thanks

    Jer

  • #2
    Re: T-9, how much and where?

    I believe the trunnion on the 3650 is actually zinc and not iron so it won't rust. Anything that is exposed iron will rust eventually. What you have to protect is mainly the table top, or any unprotected iron part that is facing up or uncovered by anything. Gravity makes moisture settle on the top surfaces which is why you'll see that even if the bottom side is completely unprotected it will barely rust. The top side will rust exponentially faster.

    It doesn't take much T-9 to do the job. Spray on just enough that you can spread it around the whole surface with a rag and then wipe it off until dry. Be sure to clean the surface really well first so it's completely free of contamination. WD-40 with steel wool works like a charm. Just make sure the WD-40 is completely wiped off and evaporated before applying the T-9.

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    • #3
      Re: T-9, how much and where?

      Sears $19 for T9 large spray bottle and a smaller for rust removal which worked very well on my TS3650 that I bought last night, Craigslist Seattle for $225.

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      • #4
        Re: T-9, how much and where?

        woodcraft sells a 3pack of rust remover, protectant, and pitch and gum remover for $14.99.

        the rust remover stinks to all hell. use in a well ventilated area.

        i work with some nasty solvents on a daily basis but this stuff made me cough quite a bit..
        there is a fine line between woodworker and tool collector....

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        • #5
          Re: T-9, how much and where?

          I've never used the T9 anywhere but on a polished cast iron surface like a saw, jointer, or BS. If you use too much, it can be sticky and take along time to dry. I've had good results spraying a light coating and wiping it off real well, let it dry, buff and repeat, then follow with a coat or two of paste wax.

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          • #6
            Re: T-9, how much and where?

            The rust remover part of the boeshield stuff contains phosphatic acid which absolutely reeks and is very toxic. Use in a very well ventilated area and stand well back when spraying it. A whif of that stuff burns like crazy.

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            • #7
              Re: T-9, how much and where?

              Personally I would think long and hard before I sprayed T9 on my saw table. The product was designed to be a spray on "coating" to protect equipment. As part of the design it was understood that the coating would also lubricate. And that is where the problem comes in to my thinking. How will this lubricant effect a finish you want to apply later to the wood?

              Personally I think it much safer to apply something that is more inert and would not effect any finishing on the surface of the saw. I use Johnson paste wax, applying it liberally and then buffing it off.

              Living in Florida with high humidity and salt air I have found that this method works very well but requires a certain amount of upkeep. Every couple of months as I use the saw I rewax it.

              An old pro recommended to me a product called Penetrol made by Flood products and sold in HD and Lowes in the paint dept. It is a paint conditioner but when applied straight out of the can is dries to an ulta thin ultra clear plastic like coating. I have experimented with the product and it is a very good to perfect rust preventer. I dipped a pair of pliers in the product and later my grandson lost the pliers outside, after a year of outdoor exposure there was no rust on them. I have painted a test sample on the outside unit of my air conditioner to see how it stood up to the elements and after 5 years it was going strong.

              Again since this product dries so there is nothing to rub off that would effect a future finish.
              Ed
              Rev Ed

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