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  • forstner bits

    has anyone used the mlcs carbide tipped fostner bits? i'm looking for a set to be used primarily in walnut and mahagony. i need a set that will stay sharp and not burn the wood. any suggestions?

  • #2
    I've not used the mlcs forstner bits so I can't comment on their quality. As far as burning the wood though, drill bit speed is the primary culprit for this problem. Even a very sharp bit will burn the wood if the bit is spinning too fast.
    edit: I refer to this quite often; http://www.woodmagazine.com/compstor/dpsc.html

    My initial set of forstner bits came from Harbor Freight. As they have worn out or I've needed a size I didn't have, I've been buying Freud bits. Excellent bits IMHO.

    [ 12-08-2003, 12:16 PM: Message edited by: Badger Dave ]
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      I'll agree wholeheartedly with Badger Dave. I also use Freud bits but the real keys are keeping sharp bits and matching the drill speed to the material. i have had a lot of success using the chart from WOOD magazine's web site:
      http://home.midsouth.rr.com/kcbg/

      Feed rate also plays a factor as does backing out the bit to allow the shavings to clear. All factors contribute to burning but the biggest two are drill speed and bit sharpness.

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      • #4
        I have a set of forstner bits from Woodcraft and they have held up well - the 16 piece set that is on sale at the moment. I have been making clocks, for Xmas presents, from walnut, mahogany and oak and have had no burn problems. As has been previously mentioned, the drill speed and clearing out shavings is very important. Basically GO SLOW! The drill speed chart is also invaluable IMHO. Dave [img]smile.gif[/img]

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        • #5
          Go slow as the others have said. A 1" bit requires more time to cut than a 1/4" bit does. I've been using the Freud HSS ones from HD with excellent results.

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          • #6
            The Hickory 16 piece set at HD is $40 plus you can get a $5 HD gift card- just bug customer service. I really like them for the price.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by yogibear:
              The Hickory 16 piece set at HD is $40 plus you can get a $5 HD gift card- just bug customer service. I really like them for the price.
              I have this set also,,,,I haven't used it all that much and only in the DP, but so far no problems with it...

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              • #8
                I received the large set of Hickory Bits as part of the FREE stuff when I purchased my machinery. I've used, well, the H__L out of mine. Some are starting to show some ware, but they have surpassed my expectations. Nothing a little diamond stone won't cure.

                On a side note, so has the Hickory Larger set of router bits that was also complimentary to my large machine purchase.

                By no means is either set a professional level, BUT, if they survive me, they are worth the money!

                My Drill Press is used exclusively for drilling, and rarely sees the 3rd speed. Typically, 1" and lower sees the 2nd speed. Anything larger and it gets the slowest. A little help with presurized air will also help keep the bit cool drilling through very hard or thick stock.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                • #9
                  When I shopped for forstner bits, based on reviews I got the Lee Valley set as very good quality for the price. www.leevalley.com

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