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  • TS 2424 or 2421

    I am fairly new to woodworking. I want to buy a Ridgid Table Saw after looking at most of the table saws available on the market. I would use my saw for basic uses such as furniture, outdoor projects, etc. I don't really have the money for the 2424 but if I get enough opinions for the 2424 I will save for a while. Does 220 V really make a big difference in the motorlife? I have been reading in the boards. Any advice would help alot and I have read all the other comparisons. How does the 2421 perform? Thank- You

    [ 04-04-2002: Message edited by: Jason ]

    [ 04-04-2002: Message edited by: Jason ]

    [ 04-04-2002: Message edited by: Jason ]

  • #2
    I have not used the 2421, but looked at it before deciding on the 2424. I think most of the readers here will offer similar perspective (anyone out there actually work with both?). Maybe Jake could do a comparison for you when he replies.

    I would suggest you think about how long and how much you intend to use the saw you buy and would always recommend getting the best you can afford. I have been very happy with the 2424 and have used it many times more than I would have expected when I bought it. Once you see what you can do, it's amazing how many other projects seem to come up.

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    • #3
      I have the ts2424 and it meets all of my needs. I have worked with the ts2412 and they are almost the same. From what I under stand and if my memory suits me the motors are different ts2424 can be hooked up to 220 and has a little more umph ts2412 cannot. I think that the fence is a little longer to the left on the ts2412. On my ts2424 wood occasionally will catch on the cast-iron wings. The ts2412 has solid metal wings. For the time that I used it the saw dust tends to build up on the wings a minor inconvenience. On the ts2412 that I used he had built a half of a bench that was on wheels and had drawers to serve as a dust collector. If you do get the ts2412 you will want to get the her-CU-lift plus that will fit the ts2412 or build a stand for it. What I like about ts2424 is the ability to move it out of the way in my small shop.

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      • #4
        Thanks guys for the help! I have been reading all the posts and have seen Jake a lot. I was wondering if you are a technician or someone working for Ridgid, anyway you seem very helpful and was wondering if you could tell me the facts on the differences of 110 and 220 V. If anybody else has advice it would be greatly appreciated. I know what it is and that it makes a difference but would anyone be able to tell me their experiances?
        [img]smile.gif[/img]

        [ 04-04-2002: Message edited by: Jason ]

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        • #5
          I looked at both and for my $ I opted for the 2412 and am NOT sorrry one bit. The 2412 has done everything that I have needed so far. I can not think of any real plus for the 2424 unles you will be useing 220v. As for as the pressed steel "wings" I do like them, it does help on the weight when you move it about. By all means get the lift unluss you are into lifting a LOAD. I can see where some want the 2424 wings but that is as I see it at matter of opinion, like soup some like it very hot and some like it cool....Hope that this help out.. dd

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          • #6
            Jason,

            running the saw on 220V does not impact or improve cutting with the saw, but it does extend motor life and improve the spool-up time on the motor. Motors running on 220V run cooler than on 110V so the motor will last longer running on 220V.

            To answer your questions on the differences.
            The 2424 will cut 24" right and left of the blade while the 2412 will cut 12" left and 24" right. The 2424 has cast iron wings (vented) and the 2412 has steel wings (solid). The biggest advantage to the vented style wings is the ability to clamp things down to the wings with C clamps (i.e. feather boards, aux. fences, etc.). The cast iron wings are also MUCH sturdier. Finally, the 2424 comes with the Herculift, a must have if you intend to move the saw. If you have never moved one by yourself...THEY ARE HEAVY (my wife and I could barely lift the box to get it in the car at Home Depot)! The caster system is excellent...the saw just glides wherever you need to move it. I don't know exactly what the difference in price is, but in my opinion it is well worth saving up to by the 2424.
            Brad Hatchett<br />brad@hatchettfamily.net

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            • #7
              ok I'm puzzle on the ts2421. do you mean the ts2412?
              Andy B.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the help and I was refering to the 2412 Andy, sorry about that.

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                • #9
                  Jason, I use my 2424 on 110V and it purrs like a kitten. Brad is right about the vented wings, I often clam feather boards to the table, especially when using the dado cutter to avoid kickback and keep the stock running straight. Huge benefit, but easy to overlook.

                  Brad, I guess for us CPA now stands for Cut Plane and Assemble.

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                  • #10
                    Thank You guys for all the help. I am new so all these tips help a great deal.
                    Jason

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                    • #11
                      Jason,

                      Well I guess I'm a little late in replying, but almost everthing I would have said has been covered here. Just to let you know I am a product manager on the RIDGID tool line. I am involved in the development of new power tools. I also do some customer service and tech work, such as this forum.

                      Jake

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                      • #12
                        Jason---I personally think the added features of the 2424 make it well worth the price of admission. Just the cast iron wings and Herculift are worth the extra cost, from my experience, having an earlier Sears version of the same saw. As you grow in your interest, these added features will save you money up front, as you would probably want a mobile stand and find the limitations of steel wings. Keep your spare change in a jar for a few months or sell some stuff on e-bay (both methods I use to build my tool fund). Good luck.
                        Dave

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                        • #13
                          I agree with Jerry...I actually run mine on 110V and it does run nicely. I am in the process of running new electrical to the shop and will install a dedicated 220V for the TS.

                          Oh and Jerry...Cut Plane and Assemble may be right on. As luck would have it I work for Andersen...so I may be cutting planing and assembling rather than accounting if things get any worse.
                          Brad Hatchett<br />brad@hatchettfamily.net

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                          • #14
                            I purchased the T2424 because of the extras that came free with the saw would have cost me as much if I had added them to the T2412. I do like the advantage of being able to cut 24" on both sides of the blade.
                            On your question of 110v verses 220v. If you compare the same HP motor that is convertable from 110v to 220v there is absolutely no difference in the HP or ump. The only time that voltage becomes a factor is when you size the wire and breaker going to the motor. You can run a smaller wire for 220v than 110v. If you were to run a 110v motor for a long distance on a to small of wire you could get a voltage drop causing the motor on 110v to seem inferior. On these saws I doubt you will ever notice the difference. It would be a different story if you were trying to run a 10 Hp single phase motor on 110V. Also there is no difference in the amount of electricity that you would comsume on the smaller motors regardless on 110V or 220V , UNLESS you had to small of a panel or were trying to run the cord a long distance on 110V therefore getting the voltage drop that I spoke of. I hope that I made some since out of all my jabbering. I have been an electrician for 25 years including owning an electric motor shop.
                            Good luck the Ridgid Saw is a good tool.

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                            • #15
                              I bought the 2412 after deciding that I wanted the saw now and don't really need a herc-u-lift or 220V. We just finished setting it up which was not the most fun but it cuts great. Thanks guys for all the help!!!!!!

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